Blog author: jcarter
posted by on Wednesday, August 20, 2014

140819_BarnWeddingFirst it was bakers, florists, and photographers. Now you can add farmers to the list of occupations that people are compelled by law to serve ends they deem unethical and in violation of their consciences. New York State has fined Cynthia and Robert Gifford $13,000 for acting on their belief that marriage is the union of a man and woman and thus declining to rent out their family farm for a same-sex wedding celebration.

As Leslie Ford and Ryan Anderson explain,

Unfortunately, New York’s Human Right’s law (Executive Law, art. 15) creates special privileges based on sexual orientation that trump the rights of business owners. Because the Giffords’ family farm is open to the public for business, New York classifies it as a “public accommodation” and then mandates that it not “discriminate” on the basis of sexual orientation.

Of course the Giffords were not engaging in any insidious discrimination—they were acting on their belief about the nature of marriage. They do not object to gay or lesbian customers attending the fall festivals, or going berry picking, or doing any of the other activities that the farm facilitates. The Giffords’ only objection is to being forced to abide by the government’s views on sexuality and host a same-sex wedding. The Human Rights Commission has now declared this historic belief about marriage to be “discrimination.”

The Giffords must pay a $1,500 mental anguish fine to each of the women and pay $10,000 in civil damages penalty to New York State. If they can’t pay in 60 days, a nine percent interest rate will be added to that total. Like Jack Phillips of Masterpiece Cakeshop, the Giffords must also institute anti-discriminationre-education classes and procedures for their staff.

What does it say about a government that believes not getting your choice of wedding causes “mental anguish” but following your religious beliefs is a finable offense?

Radio Free ActonThis week on Radio Free Acton, Michael Matheson Miller continues his conversation with David Bromwich, Sterling Professor of English at Yale University, on the thought of Edmund Burke. Bromwich is the author of The Intellectual Life of Edmund Burke, the first volume of what will be a two-volume intellectual biography of Burke. We kick off this portion of the conversation with some analysis of Burke’s position on free markets and crony capitalism..

To listen to Part 2 of Miller’s interview with Bromwich, use the audio player below; Part 1 is available here.

Muslim-PersecutionRonald S. Lauder is the president of the World Jewish Congress. He wants his fellow Jews to speak out and stand up against the persecution of Christians, especially at the hands of ISIS. He calls the current situation in Iraq “Nazi-like,” and that the situation has failed to garner attention from political leaders, aging rock stars, and the world in general.

He maintains that ISIS is not a loosely organized group of rag-tag jihadists, but

…a real military force that has managed to take over much of Iraq with a successful business model that rivals its coldblooded spearhead of death. It uses money from banks and gold shops it has captured, along with control of oil resources and old-fashioned extortion, to finance its killing machine, making it perhaps the wealthiest Islamist terrorist group in the world. But where it truly excels is in its carnage, rivaling the death orgies of the Middle Ages. It has ruthlessly targeted Shiites, Kurds and Christians.

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Blog author: jcarter
posted by on Wednesday, August 20, 2014

140621-world-iraq-border-file-6a_62087f8de527aaa365a9bd952f19bed7Christians from a broad range of traditions — from Chaldean Catholics to Southern Baptists — are uniting in a call for military action against a common enemy: ISIS. As Mark Tooley notes, the persecution of religious believers by the Islamic extremists has “reanimated talk about Christian Just War teaching.”

Citing the call by Iraq’s Chaldean Patriarch for military intervention, a group of prominent Christian thinkers, with others, has declared that “nothing short of the destruction of ISIS/ISIL as a fighting force will provide long-term protection of victims.” Urging U.S. and international help for local forces against ISIS, they assert that “no options that are consistent with the principles of just war doctrine should be off the table.” They want expanded U.S. air strikes against ISIS and U.S. arms for the Kurds, among others. The most prominent church official on this list is the Southern Baptist Convention’s chief public policy spokesman.

Pope Francis has seemingly agreed, at least obliquely, about the morality of force against ISIS. He said on Monday in flight home from South Korea:“In these cases, where there is an unjust aggression, I can only say that it is licit to stop the unjust aggressor.” Plus, “I underscore the verb ‘stop.’ I’m not saying ‘bomb’ or ‘make war,’ just ‘stop.’ And the means that can be used to stop them must be evaluated.” Pope John Paul II is recalled speaking similarly during the 1990s Bosnian genocide. But typically pontiffs speak unequivocally against war.

Read more . . .

Blog author: jcarter
posted by on Wednesday, August 20, 2014

Archbishop of Mosul: “I have lost my Diocese to Islam – You in the West will also become the victims of Muslims”
Archbishop Amel Nona, Rorate Caeli

Our sufferings today are the prelude of those you, Europeans and Western Christians, will also suffer in the near future. I lost my diocese. The physical setting of my apostolate has been occupied by Islamic radicals who want us converted or dead. But my community is still alive.

High-Tech Schools With Low-Tech Problems
Allison Kieselowsky, The Federalist

What this mom found after enrolling her child in an online public school.

A Bipartisan Consensus on How to Fight Poverty?
Arnold Kling, The American

In an otherwise bitterly partisan political environment, two recent policy proposals from both sides of the aisle share core ideas for reforming anti-poverty programs.

Natural Law, Natural Rights, and Private Property
Edward Feser, Library of Law and Liberty

In this essay I present a sketch of a classical natural law approach to natural rights and private property. The approach is “classical” insofar as it is grounded in metaphysical assumptions of the sort defended by ancient and medieval philosophers like Plato, Aristotle, and Aquinas.

Boston_Skyline_Web-Banner1Conversations about “faith-work integration” are alive and well, whether in the church, workplace, or academia, and the Acton Institute continues to offer a variety of resources on the subject, from its growing series of tradition-specific primers to various books and lectures to educational video curricula.

In keeping with these efforts, the Acton Institute will be a co-sponsor to the very first Faith @ Work Summit in Boston, MA from October 24-25, where a diverse group of businesspeople, students, pastors, and various others will gather to discuss the state of the faith-work movement and how we might move forward.

From the event’s web site:

On October 24 and 25, 2014, a seminary, a technology school, a business school, and a foundation join forces to convene a summit to address these two over-arching questions.

The purpose of the summit is to gather active leaders and participants in the faith at work movement to assess the state of the movement (achievements, needs, obstacles, opportunities, and resources) and together to develop an agenda going forward for individuals in the workplace, churches, marketplace ministries, seminaries and Bible schools, and universities and business schools.

This is a working conference, not a celebrity or performance-oriented event. All speakers, leaders, and organizers are donating their time and effort. We welcome and encourage every voice in attendance to help shape our understanding and our sense of agenda going forward.

This is an important gathering for the movement at large, and an encouraging sign of the growth and prevalence of this important conversation. I look forward to seeing the fruit that comes from it.

View a list of speakers here, and register for the conference here.

“They say they want justice for Mike Brown,” says Mumtaz Lalani, an store owner in Ferguson, Missouri, “Is this justice? I don’t understand. What justice is this?

Lalani was referring to the looters who, on Saturday, robbed his store and attempted to burn it down.

The events in Ferguson are heartbreaking, but they will soon be all-but-forgotten. Within a few weeks the media—and the public’s limited attention—will move on to another story. Within a few months the criminal justice system will determine who is most responsible for the tragic death—whether it was Mike Brown or the officer who pulled the trigger. But the impact on Ferguson of the looting and riots will likely last for decades. And if other cities are any indication, Ferguson may never recover. As Fred Siegel explains,
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Blog author: ehilton
posted by on Tuesday, August 19, 2014

sharing-economyJohn O. McGinnis, the George C. Dix Professor in Constitutional Law at Northwestern University, says we are in the midst of a sharing economy, and that’s a good thing. (Don’t get all socialist on me; a sharing economy is one driven by service and technology. We are not going to have to pool our food in the commune.) McGinnis says this type of economy is good for liberty as well.

There are three basic features of a sharing economy:

    1. It reduces costs, by matching up real-time idle services and resources with people in need.
    2. It employs the hard-to-employ, say, people who need a very flexible schedule.
    3. It creates new jobs – jobs that didn’t exist before.

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    Blog author: sstanley
    posted by on Tuesday, August 19, 2014

    Mark your calendars! On Friday, October 31, The Acton Institute and Calvin College’s Calvin Center for innovation in Business will present a Symposium on Common Grace in Business. This event will bring members of the faith, academic, and business communities together to explore and consider Abraham Kuyper’s works on common grace and how it applies to various business disciplines. It will also celebrate the publication of the Acton Institute’s first translation of Kuyper’s works on common grace into English. It will take place at the Prince Conference Center on Calvin’s campus in Grand Rapids, Mich.

    Keynote speakers are Peter Heslam, director of Transforming Business at Cambridge University, a multi-disciplinary research and development project on enterprise solutions to poverty, and Richard Mouw, former president of Fuller Theological Seminary. Other speakers include business leaders from Grand Rapids and professors, including:

    Mary Queen of Heaven Missionaries with His Eminence Ricardo J. Cardinal Vidal, Archbishop of Cebu

    Mary Queen of Heaven Missionaries with His Eminence Ricardo J. Cardinal Vidal, Archbishop of Cebu

    A petite woman in pink, in a Filipino red-light district, is picked out by a “tourist” as a possible sex partner for the evening. A pimp accompanying him tells him she’s not a good choice.

    She’s a nun.

    The Mary Queen of Missionaries (MQHM) are a group of Catholic sisters who serve the sex workers in the Philippines. Their order was established solely for this purpose:

    To seek the stray and fallen away in the person of the victims of prostitution and in the power that the Holy Spirit gives, bring them back to the bosom of the Father.  We search for them in the bars and casas and along streets in the red light districts, offering them a decent way of living in our “Home of Love”, a rehabilitation and livelihood training center for them and their children. Those who are willing to embrace God’s grace of renewed life with Him, are sheltered in the Home of Love with all the basic provisions, free of charge.

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