We’re happy to announce that the latest print issue of the Journal of Markets & Morality is available online.

The Spring 2009 issue includes a noteworthy study by Alan T. Y. Chan and Shu-kam Lee. In “Christ and Business Culture: Another Classification of Christians in Workplaces According to an Empirical Study in Hong Kong,” Chan and Lee outline four types of Christians at work: Christian soldiers, panic followers, strugglers, and Sunday Christians. Following the classification, Chan and Lee “develop a model of potential, evolutionary processes that these Christian types may follow using game-theory analysis” and conclude with “an empirical data set, which was conducted in Hong Kong, to illustrate our classifications and suggest potential strategies to efficiently allocate resources within Christian churches.”

Also included in this issue:

  • Andrew Abela: “Subsidiarity and the Just Wage: Implications of Catholic Social Teaching for the Minimum-Wage Debate”
  • Kim Hawtrey & Stuart Dullard: “Corporate Virtue and the Joint-Stock Company”
  • Steven Loomis & Jacob Rodriguez: “The Violence of Aggregation: Amartya Sen’s Possibility of Social Choice”
  • Stefano Solari & Daniele Corrado: “Social Justice and Economic Order According to Natural Law”
  • Jennifer Dirmeyer & Paola Revelo & Walter E. Block: “Poverty, Dignity, Economic Development, and the Catholic Church”
  • Maurizio Ragazzi: “Concordats Today: From the Second Vatican Council to John Paul II”
  • Keith Aaron Boozer: “Magnanimity: Aquinas’ Examination of the Aristocratic Virtue”

Keith Aaron Boozer is a doctoral student at Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary, and the journal encourages submissions from graduate students.

This issue also contains a wealth of helpful and incisive reviews of the latest books in Christian social thought, ethics and economics, and the philosophy, history, and methodology of economics. The timely editorial by executive editor Stephen Grabill, “Protestant Social Thought,” and article abstracts of current issues are freely available to nonsubscribers. And as per our “moving wall” policy of two issues, the most recent publicly-available archived issue is volume 11, number 1 (Spring 2008).

Access to the electronic versions of two latest “current” issues is available for individuals on a subscription basis. An electronic-only subscription is available for $10, and there are a number of other options for those wishing to receive the journal in hard copy form. We also encourage you to recommend the journal to friends, schools, and institutions.

Journal of Markets & Morality