Latin America’s Catholic bishops are preparing for a major conference in Brazil next spring and the agenda will include, aside from issues relating directly to the faith, discussions about politics, populism, corruption and economic globalization. Samuel Gregg says the meeting holds great promise: “Few realize it, but May 2007 could be a decisive moment for Catholic Latin America.”

Read the commentary here.


  • Jan J Wnek

    How about dealing with our own US “oligarchs”?! No mention here of those, particularly in agriculture, whose “dumping” in underdeveloped countries has, in many cases, destroyed their agricultural base. What about those? What’s good for the goose is good for the gander…

  • Kevin

    Jan,
    You’re right, but that was not the subject of Sam Gregg’s article, If you follow Acton policy discussions, you’ll see that we oppose government aid to business, including agricultural subsidies, and say so whenever we mention the topic. Here’s one example: http://www.acton.org/ppolicy/comment/article.php?id=157

  • http://www.schlacks.org John Powers

    I am completely convinced that one can be against subsidies, and in favor of dumping.

    Would someone please dump some subsidized gold on my doorstep? I guarantee you if you send me gold well below market price, I will profit. Yes, it will destroy my incentive to mine gold in my back yard, but I will profit.

    BTW, there is no subsidy for corn this year, nor the forseeable future (not even close). Will the powerhouse Mexican corn market rev up to meet the demand for $4 corn? Or is the dumping argument Leftist chatter?

    My guess is the latter (pardon the couple, but that is the chatter).

    JBP