Acton Institute Powerblog

PowerBlog Two Year Anniversary

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Today marks the second anniversary of the PowerBlog’s inaugural post, which reflected on the recent passing of Pope John Paul II. Given that the average blog lifespan is measured in months and not years, we’re proud to have reached this milestone.

Thanks to all the contributors both within and without the Institute who have helped to make the blog successful. Special recognition is especially due to Jonathan Spalink, who is the man behind the slick design and functionality of the blog. And of course without the PowerBlog’s faithful readers, the entire enterprise would be pointless.

In the last two years the blog has grown to be a significant feature of the Acton Institute’s online presence. Here are some of the vital stats from the last 24 months:

  • 1500+ blog posts
  • Currently between 1500 and 2000 daily visits
  • As of April 3, 2007, top 5 post categories (# of posts in parenthesis): Business and Society (297), News and Events (245), Environmental Stewardship (194), Effective Compassion (170), Bible and Theology (142)

Please leave your comments, questions, and suggestions in the comments sections of this post. We’d love to hear what you love about the PowerBlog, what you don’t like, and anything of which you’d like to see more or less.

Are there special topics or events you’d like to see us cover? Do you want to see more live-blogging of particular conferences? Is there anyone you’d like to see added to our cadre of blogging personalities? Can you not wait to get your hands on an Acton Institute PowerBlog coffee mug (details forthcoming)?

We’re always looking for ways to improve our offerings here and your thoughts would be most helpful as we celebrate the PowerBlog’s “cotton” anniversary.

Jordan J. Ballor Jordan J. Ballor (Dr. theol., University of Zurich; Ph.D., Calvin Theological Seminary) is a senior research fellow and director of publishing at the Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, where he also serves as executive editor the Journal of Markets & Morality. He is author of Get Your Hands Dirty: Essays on Christian Social Thought (and Action) (Wipf & Stock, 2013), Covenant, Causality, and Law: A Study in the Theology of Wolfgang Musculus (Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 2012) and Ecumenical Babel: Confusing Economic Ideology and the Church's Social Witness (Christian's Library Press, 2010), as well as editor of numerous works, including Abraham Kuyper Collected Works in Public Theology. Jordan is also associate director of the Junius Institute for Digital Reformation Research at Calvin Theological Seminary. He has authored articles in academic publications such as The Journal of Religion, Scottish Journal of Theology, Reformation & Renaissance Review, and Journal of Scholarly Publishing, and has written popular pieces for newspapers including the Detroit News, Orange County Register, and The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. In 2006, Jordan was profiled in the book, The Relevant Nation: 50 Activists, Artists And Innovators Who Are Changing The World Through Faith. Jordan's scholarly interests include Reformation studies, church-state relations, theological anthropology, social ethics, theology and economics, and research methodology. Jordan is a member of the Christian Reformed Church in North America (CRCNA), and he resides in Jenison, Michigan with his wife and three children.

Comments

  • Marc Vander Maas

    Another potential PowerBlog-themed gift idea:
    Nothing says “Absolute Power” like a 1001 horsepower, 250 mph [url=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bugatti_Veyron]Bugatti Veyron[/url]. Only $1.5 million at the Acton Bookshoppe.

  • At least it’s street legal!

  • D. J. Milne

    Federalist Papers: The Third Testament!
    (Or, Second-and-a-Half)

    The Federalist Papers seem an inimitable expression and defense of the nexus of spirit and politics. They provide one of the most admirable examples of the application of ‘Religion’ as well as ‘Reason’ to political theory and praxis.

    I would like to see Powerblogs referring routinely to the Federalist Papers to support (or oppose) Acton Institute’s and Powerblog’s contentions.

  • Thanks, D.J.

    Your suggestion is a good one and duly noted. The resources [url=http://blog.acton.org/index.html?/archives/975-Pinpoint-Federalism.html]here[/url] should be helpful to PowerBlog contributors and commenters in this regard.