An assortment of radical socialist chums gathered in Caracas, Venezuela for a lively discussion on the issue, “United States: A possible revolution.” The event was part of the third annual Venezuela International Book Fair on November 9-18, and featured the usual campus radicals, anti-American crusaders, and Marxist activists. As usual among committed Marxists, the main target of evil and oppression in the world is the United States.

Writing a summary of events for the Militant, Olympia Newton’s article is titled, “Venezuela forum debates prospects for revolutionary change in U.S.” The Militant describes itself as “A socialist newsweekly published in the interests of working people.” Rebuffing the claim that America has a revolutionary past at the event was Richard Gott, a British author and defender of Hugo Chavez and his government. Newton quoted Gott in her article:

“There has never been a revolution in the United States, and anyone who thinks there has been is ignorant of their own history,” responded panelist Richard Gott, a British author and journalist. Gott said the American Revolution, which defeated British colonial rule, could not be considered a revolution. Rather, it was a war to take land from Native American tribes, whose territory, he said, was being protected by the British royal army.

“No, a revolution is not possible in the United States,” said Gott. “It is conservative and reactionary. The only hope is Latin America.”

Newton also quoted Black activist Amiri Baraka who is known for his 9/11 poem, “Somebody Blew Up America.” Amiri Baraka suggested some reforms to help spark the revolution:

“That revolution has never been completed,” Baraka said. “There is still no democracy for Blacks.” He proposed that Blacks and Latinos, including the “progressive” Black bourgeoisie, unite around a program to abolish the electoral college; establish a unicameral parliamentary system; ban “private money” from election campaigns; make voting compulsory; and restore voting rights to felons. Such constitutional reforms, he said, would shift power towards “people’s democracy” in the United States. Revolutionary goals could then be put on the agenda.

If you recognize these ideas, some of the thoughts such as repealing the electoral college, felons voting, and banning private money in elections has found its way into the mainstream of American political debate.

So while the prospects for a Marxist revolutionary change in America are not bright, radical ideas are found in many mainline denominational churches. I remember attending a Virginia Annual Conference of the United Methodist Church for The Institute on Religion and Democracy and seeing many copies of Fidel Castro’s book, War, Racism and Economic Justice: The Global Ravages of Capitalism prominently displayed by the Women’s Division of the United Methodist Church.

Hugo Chavez, a voice of authority and leader for many of the politically oppressed in Hollywood, has also found passionate supporters among some entrenched in leadership of mainline churches. It’s a reminder of their past love affair with Daniel Ortega and the Sandinistas and the old cliche, “The more things change, the more they stay the same.”


  • http://blog.acton.org/ Jordan

    Here are three relevant quotes from Lord Acton about the conservative/radical aspects of the American Revolution:
    [quote=”Lord Acton”]There could never be a revolution less provoked by oppression than America. Thenceforth the right of a nation to judge for itself could not be denied.

    The Americans, having broken the thread in 1776, spliced it together again. They became eminently conservative in 1787.

    What the French took from the Americans was their theory of revolution, not their theory of government — their cutting, not their sewing.
    [/quote]
    See also [url=https://secure.acton.org/BookShoppe/main/title.php?id=141]”Lord Acton on Revolution,”[/url] a paper given by Russell Kirk.

  • Mark S.

    Great article!

    Some favorite leftist foaming at the mouth…

    “There is still no democracy for Blacks.”

    (*Provided you ingnore all the black people who voted and who are mayors, governors, and members of congress*)

    “Unite around a program to abolish the electoral college; establish a unicameral parliamentary system; ban “private money” from election campaigns; make voting compulsory; and restore voting rights to felons.”

    (*Ladies and gentlemen I give you the Democratic Party platform*)

    Gott said the American Revolution, which defeated British colonial rule, could not be considered a revolution. Rather, it was a war to take land from Native American tribes, whose territory, he said, was being protected by the British royal army.

    (*Where to begin? Apparently the Declaration of Independence reads…We hold these truths to be self evident that Indians lands will provide good space for shopping malls. That these lands will also provide space for giant sports arenas with Indian mascots. That among these mascots are Cheif Wahoo, Knockahoma and the Florida State Seminole.*)

    Mind you we didn’t hear Ward Churchill quoted…he must have been the “voice of reason”.

    If you’re not laughing at leftist tools you’re not having a good time.

  • Werner Speer

    Ray, I think the flotsom from across the globe seems to wash up on the shores of Venuzuela. I reemember the poet laureate of Newark NJ Amiri Baraka (aka Leroy Jones). How appropriate that he should be a star in the Chavez follies.

  • http://thecommentarybyamoros.blogspot.com/ Jose A. Amoros

    Thank you for this posting on
    “Latin America’s Messengers for Recycled Marxism”. I needed a good laugh. I went and read the actual reporting from “The Militant”, and then I was laughing so hard I almost lost my voice. I especially enjoyed the poem about the personal call all 4,000 Jews received telling them not to be at the WTC on 9/11. Where was this guy during the TV writer’s strike? Well, I guess in Venezuela writing for Chavez. Then I read the current article on “non-racist debate on immigration” in the “Women’s Division of the United Methodist Church” and I was really rolling on the floor by then. Having had studied at Candler this brought back some fun memories. http://thecommentarybyamoros.blogspot.com/