Acton Institute Powerblog

More Comfy Lounges…

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There were several comments and comments on comments following my recent “Comfy Faculty Lounges” contribution. In the Wall Street Journal, the author of the book I was reviewing makes her own case regarding tenure and teaching versus research.

“At a recent conference where I spoke on collective bargaining in higher education, one professor questioned (and others in the room also fussed about) my right to speak on the subject without—she was incredulous—a Ph.D.! I might ask why a degree in medieval literature or molecular biology would qualify one to discuss the growing unionization movement on college campuses.”

Naomi Riley’s full article “Academia’s Crisis of Irrelevance” is here. And the beat goes on.

Ken Larson Ken Larson is a businessman and writer who with his wife recently moved from their native state California to a semi-rural part of Virginia, near the Chesapeake Bay. A graduate of California State University with a major in English, his eclectic career includes editing the first "reloading manual" for Sierra Bullets [something that earns him major league credibility when picking crabs with new friends on Sunday afternoons] and authoring a novel about a family's school choice decisions titled ReEnchantment, A Schoolboy's Adventure. His web site is http://www.reenchantment.net. For ten years, Ken was the only Protestant on The Consultative School Board for the Roman Catholic Diocese of Orange near Los Angeles and chaired their inaugural Catholic Conference on Business and Ethics in support of needy parish schools in the diocese. He continues to be active in his new community and mindful of America's civic education malaise.

Comments

  • Apparently my previous comment was lost or something.  (I can’t say I’m thrilled by the moderating on this site.) 

    Since I’m not a WSJ subscriber I can’t read the linked article, so I’ll just ask.  When Riley refers to the growing “unionization movement on college campuses,” is she referring to tenure?  If so, she would appear to be contradicting her own research which shows that the number of tenured faculty has been steadily declining.