Blog author: jballor
by on Thursday, December 18, 2008

The blogosphere is atwitter over the news that Rick Warren, pastor of Saddleback Church, will give the invocation at President-elect Barack Obama’s inauguration. The decision on Warren’s part to accept is getting criticism from the right, while Obama’s offer of the opportunity is getting criticized from the left.

At Redstate Erick Erickson views Warren’s participation as evidence of his desire to be the next “Protestant Pope” after the decline of Billy Graham. Erickson writes that Warren “wants to be the moral voice of the moral majority the way Graham used to be and he has a bigger ego to boot. So he’s happy to lay his hands on the new President and have the media give him the legitimacy the media once gave Billy Graham.”

And from the other side of the spectrum, Peter Daou’s entry at the Huffington Post does a good job summarizing the massive criticism Obama has gotten from the more radical strands of his party. In Daou’s words “the progressive community is outraged.”

Of course, they were also outraged when Obama participated in Warren’s Saddleback Civil Forum on the Presidency. And so too were many religious conservatives doubtful about Warren’s commitment to the two rails of the Religious Right, marriage and abortion. Many conservatives were pleasantly surprised when Warren (politely) pressed Obama on his views about abortion, which spawned the now-infamous “above my paygrade” response from the now President-elect. Quite frankly, Warren doesn’t need the media to “give” him legitimacy…his popularity, his pulpit, and his ability to bring together politicians in a public forum do that well enough.

I wouldn’t be surprised if Warren again surprises his conservative critics, even though an inauguration invocation is hardly the place for political grandstanding or pontificating. My opinion about Warren remains unchanged. At the time he organized the Saddleback forum, I thought it was a mark in his favor that he could act as a fair dealing arbiter and get the two major presidential candidates to appear. Only someone who had garnered a level of trust from both sides could achieve that kind of thing, and that’s where the comparisons to Billy Graham are most accurate and complimentary to Warren: “Perhaps Warren has had to upset the margins on both sides of the political aisle to get himself into a position that could command the kind of respect from both candidates that would get them to this platform.” He seems to be doing the same thing here.

Gina Dalfonzo over at the Point says that “a Christian leader given the opportunity to stand up and pray for the nation in public on an important occasion should generally take it, I think, no matter who’s doing the asking.” I do think pastors should avoid partisanship, as best they can, and I think Warren has done so rather admirably.

On this point there’s an interesting comparison to be made between Warren’s appearance at a presidential inauguration and the offer to Joel Hunter and Cameron Strang to pray at the Democratic National Convention. Strang, who is the founder and CEO of Relevant magazine, initially accepted the invitation, and then declined under criticism that his appearance would lend partisan credibility to Obama. Strang explained his choice to withdraw, saying, “If my praying at the DNC was perceived as showing favoritism and incorrectly labeling me as endorsing one candidate over the other, then I needed to have pause.”

So here’s the question: is praying at an inauguration more or less partisan than praying at a party’s convention? Or are the two equally partisan? I’m inclined to think that praying at the inauguration isn’t nearly so easily identifiable with “endorsing one candidate over the other” or “showing favoritism.” Once the election is over, the President is everybody’s President. Before the election, that’s a different story.


  • http://caffeinatedthoughts.com Shane Vander Hart

    I think it is less partisan, and as a conservative have absolutely no problem with Rick Warren praying at the inauguration. I have been impressed with how he has conducted himself during this election and has provided a good model for pastors to follow.

  • http://www.liveactionfilms.org psalmistsoldier110

    Planed Parenthood is caught on video helping girls return to the arms of their statutory rapists. Jesus calls us to protect the innocent. Psalms 139. The church must rise up against the abortion community which threatens our daughters. .***.http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EinILQ4hDP0 *** Jesus protect these girls.

  • Revd ken Day

    let’s cut through all the talk on this and get to the real issue. I agree with Gina, whoever is asked to do this should accept.What a great opportunity for the world to see a Christian leader praying for the President in public. It doesn’t happen here in Australia like that. Rick Warren will be God’s instrument, and he will represent all the faithful throughout the world. The Angels are rejoicing. Ken Day. Australia.

  • travis christensen

    People miss the obvious. Obama has been most closely associated with Rev. Wright, a figure that many American find a little scary. Now he will be associated with Rick Warren, arguably the most liked preacher in America. This is marketing.

  • Sergio Pages

    I agree with your comment. This is marketing and it is important that we the people keep ou focus on principles and not the hype. Obama’s presidential campaign was very well executed and we are beginning to see that his team will be utilizing their marketing talents to govern.