Acton Institute Powerblog

The Best Hope for Our Children’s Education

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Steven Garber, principal and founder of The Washington Institute for Faith, Vocation and Culture, believes that what kind of school our children attend is far less important than what kind of people they are shaped into:

[W]here they go to school is not finally the most important decision; how they learn and who they become with what they learn is more critical. As I long argued at Rivendell—remembering the moral vision of Tolkien himself—it is not only important that our children learn their duty to love God and his world, but that they learn to desire that. The one is easier than the other. But duty and desire together are the best hope of a good education, and a good life, for children everywhere.

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Joe Carter Joe Carter is a Senior Editor at the Acton Institute. Joe also serves as an editor at the The Gospel Coalition, a communications specialist for the Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission of the Southern Baptist Convention, and as an adjunct professor of journalism at Patrick Henry College. He is the editor of the NIV Lifehacks Bible and co-author of How to Argue like Jesus: Learning Persuasion from History's Greatest Communicator (Crossway).

Comments

  • When we started looking at schools for our 5-year old, we looked at public charters, public and private schools. The bottom line for us was not the quality of education but the worldview of the teachers and the worldview taught to our children.  We ended up in a wonderful private school mostly because of their teachers and their dedication to teaching the kids a Christian worldview.

    • RogerMcKinney

       It’s a shame that in much of the US Christians have to resort to private schools to find Christian teachers. We are lucky enough to live in a part of the country in which most of the public school teachers are devout Christians, many of whom attend my church. We don’t have to worry about teachers promoting non-Christian worldviews.