There are two great lies our culture promotes among children in school, students in college, and professionals in the business world, says Hugh Whelchel:

 (1) “If you work hard enough, you can be anything you want to be.”

(2) “You can be the best in the world. If you try hard enough, you could be the next Zuckerberg.”

Whelchel explains why these lies have “catastrophically damaged our view of work and vocation, because they have distorted our biblical view of success.”

If we will rediscover the biblical doctrine of work and correctly understand our vocational calling, we must recognize a more timeless, faithful definition of success.

The late John Wooden, the most successful college basketball coach in history and a committed Christian, was once asked how he would define success. He replied:

Success is peace of mind which is a direct result of self-satisfaction in knowing you did your best to become the best that you are capable of becoming.

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  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1449963697 Steven C. McMullen

    Excellent post.  I sometimes have students who wonder “if Mark Zuckerberg’s story is possible, then why should we worry about our education system?”  It is important, if we are think clearly about economics, to think about the difference between human flourishing and wealth.

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