Acton Institute Powerblog

More Palmeiro Questions

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Two not-so-obviously related news items from today’s Marketplace midday update:

#1) Pharmaceutical company Pfizer says it’ll change the way it markets drugs to people. The company announced this morning it will educate doctors for at least 6 months about new medicines before running television or print ads. Pfizer also says it won’t advertise male impotence drugs during the Super Bowl.

#2) Rafael Palmeiro is heading back to work after serving a 10-day suspension for using steroids. Business of sports analyst David Carter talks to Cheryl Glaser about steroids and baseball.

These stories raise the question whether Rafael’s need for the “little blue pill” is related to his use of steroids. One of the side effects listed for steroids is “increased libido,” albeit with “lowered natural production of testosterone thus effecting the male sperm count.”

In a WebMD feature, Martin Downs examines the issue, as he writes of Palmeiro’s endorsement agreement, “The deal has made people wonder whether Palmeiro really represents men with erectile dysfunction, or whether Pfizer, the company that makes Viagra, wants to persuade young men to try it for fun.” If Palmeiro’s steriod use did result in increased libido, it’s more doubtful that he had a legitimate need.

Perhaps a steroid-increased sexual appetite played a role in his VIAGRA® use. There is no doubt that Palmeiro’s baseball success, powered in part by steroid use, had some positive economic impact for him beyond his baseball stats and contracts. He became a pefect pitchman for Pfizer’s VIAGRA. (One of the suggested lines for opening dialogue with your doctor about VIAGRA used to be: “Have you seen the VIAGRA commercial with Major League Baseball Star Rafael Palmeiro?”)

And in a related story, “VIAGRA is a proud sponsor of Major League Baseball®.”

Jordan J. Ballor Jordan J. Ballor (Dr. theol., University of Zurich; Ph.D., Calvin Theological Seminary) is a senior research fellow and director of publishing at the Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, where he also serves as executive editor the Journal of Markets & Morality. He is author of Get Your Hands Dirty: Essays on Christian Social Thought (and Action) (Wipf & Stock, 2013), Covenant, Causality, and Law: A Study in the Theology of Wolfgang Musculus (Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 2012) and Ecumenical Babel: Confusing Economic Ideology and the Church's Social Witness (Christian's Library Press, 2010), as well as editor of numerous works, including Abraham Kuyper Collected Works in Public Theology. Jordan is also associate director of the Junius Institute for Digital Reformation Research at Calvin Theological Seminary. He has authored articles in academic publications such as The Journal of Religion, Scottish Journal of Theology, Reformation & Renaissance Review, and Journal of Scholarly Publishing, and has written popular pieces for newspapers including the Detroit News, Orange County Register, and The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. In 2006, Jordan was profiled in the book, The Relevant Nation: 50 Activists, Artists And Innovators Who Are Changing The World Through Faith. Jordan's scholarly interests include Reformation studies, church-state relations, theological anthropology, social ethics, theology and economics, and research methodology. Jordan is a member of the Christian Reformed Church in North America (CRCNA), and he resides in Jenison, Michigan with his wife and three children.

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