In between dire warnings from the World Alliance of Reformed Churches (WARC) about the evil neo-liberal economic order and calls for more money from its member denominations, this gem arrived today via Ecumenical News International:

Church bank says its loans are at forefront of anti-poverty fight

Utrecht (ENI). Thirty years after its launch, a church-backed international development bank says it has become a world leader in providing resources for small loans for poor people to set up in business. The Netherlands-based Oikocredit agency announced it had approved record funding in the first nine months of the year for what is called the microfinance sector, which among other things offers small microcredit loans to cash-strapped borrowers.

According to its website, “Oikocredit believes that poor people can build themselves a better life, if only given the chance, if only given credit.” Beyond the cliches and PC buzzwords, there’s some clear economic thinking going on here.

“Throughout our years of operations, Oikocredit has proven that small poor entrepreneurs, cooperatives and others in developing countries are credit-worthy partners indeed. In fact, the demand for loans offered by Oikocredit steadily increases as the effectiveness of this credit for development is broadly recognised. Thus our loans are directed at groups: cooperatives of small-scale coffee farmers, for instance, who need their own coffee mill for increased income. Or microfinance institutions that split up our loans into thousands of small loans to very poor people.”

It’s not perfect, but its a far sight better than many other half-brained church schemes to “end poverty now.”

  • Steve Daskal

    Interesting point. Micro-capitalism is a far better means for the developed world and Christians to provide immediately effective and useful care at a personal level to the poor in the under-developed world than most government-to-government aid or loan schemes, which usually promote waste, corruption, and subsidize bureaucracy rather than productivity. Micro-capitalism works — high return on investment, very low default rates, and substantial income/job development. This is part of what Rich DeVos had in mind with his concept of “Compassionate Capitalism” — doing well by doing good.