Leading religion commentator, Terry Mattingly looks back on Easter in an article about Catholics attending services despite the overcrowding from “Poinsettia and Lily Catholics,” those who only attend a Mass on Christmas and Easter.

He describes how the influx of those attending mass affects Catholics who faithfully attend church every Sunday. He says:

“I really am glad that they’re there,” wrote Fisher. “It’s got to be better than never going to Mass, and I do believe that the Holy Spirit could easily use that opportunity to send a powerful word, a lingering image, a stray idea into the mind or heart of a fallen-away Catholic, and a casual visit that was made just out of habit, or to please someone’s grandma, might be the first step to coming back home to the faith. And yeah, they’re not being reverent. Neither am I, by going through the motions while grumbling in my heart.

“But I know my limits. I know I’m not going to suddenly turn into Mother Teresa, especially if I show up 40 minutes early and STILL have to spend the whole Mass on my poor tired feet, trying to keep nine kids docile and attentive when the strangers who did get a seat are playing on their Gameboys. With the sound on.”

Mattingly goes on to quote Joe Carter, who has also tackled this issue on the Acton PowerBlog:

At some point, this crush will affect whether some believers — even the most faithful — are willing to endure the tension in Easter pews, noted Joe Carter, senior editor at the Acton Institute. Recent numbers from LifeWay Research indicated that only 58 percent of self-identified Protestants, 57 percent of Catholics and 45 percent of nondenominational church members said they were likely to attend Easter services. It’s legitimate to ask why so many believers are staying away, he argued.

Perhaps this trend can be explained with the help of a quip by baseball legend Yogi Berra, said Carter. When asked why he no longer frequented a popular restaurant, Berra said, “Nobody goes there anymore. It’s too crowded.”

You can read the entire article on Terry Mattingly’s website.