Acton Institute Powerblog

PowerLinks 05.30.13

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Does the Book of Acts Command Socialism?
Art Lindsley, The Gospel Coalition

Does Acts 2-5 really command socialism? A quick reading of these chapters might make it seem so.

Pope Francis’ affinity for liberation theology — wait, what?
Mollie Hemingway, Get Religion

Pope Francis’ “affinity” for liberation theology”? He sure has a curious way of showing that affinity, no?

Christian schools seen for cultural impact
Erin Roach, Baptist Press

When you think about it, a kid is in school 2,100 minutes a week and he’s in church maybe 120 minutes a week. If he’s getting any discipling at home, it isn’t much and it certainly doesn’t compare to the discipling he’s getting in a secular school. And 90 percent of our children attend a secular school,” he said.

Political common goods are of a fixed size
James Chastek, Just Thomism

One factor that continually gets overlooked in these debates is that the size and degree of complexity of the thing you call “government” has an essential role to play in the question, since governments – at least those that are political common goods – are of a fixed size.

Joe Carter Joe Carter is a Senior Editor at the Acton Institute. Joe also serves as an editor at the The Gospel Coalition, a communications specialist for the Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission of the Southern Baptist Convention, and as an adjunct professor of journalism at Patrick Henry College. He is the editor of the NIV Lifehacks Bible and co-author of How to Argue like Jesus: Learning Persuasion from History's Greatest Communicator (Crossway).

Comments

  • Lindsley’s piece is a helpful rejoinder. It brings to mind one of my favorite quotes from James K. A. Smith: “The early church had a clear and established practice of compulsory property redistribution.”