Acton Institute Powerblog

PowerLinks 07.08.13

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What Edmund Burke Knew About Obamacare
David Wilezol, Values & Capitalism

One of the bedrock ideas of conservative thought is the law of unintended consequences. Despite our best calculated projections, we can’t know for certain the outcomes of every public policy decision.

John Calvin and rebellion against the government
Paul Helm, Credo Magazine

I’ve heard it said that John Calvin was not in favor of rebellion against the government, and that it was John Locke to whom would-be rebels looked to justify Christian rebellion, as we might call it. For a recent example of this view see here. But I think the matter is a bit more complicated than that, and that a case can be made for Calvin leaving open, in fact if not in intention, the legitimacy of rebellion as a last resort against civil injustice.

Coordinating the Kingdom and the Common Good
Luke Bretherton, Cardus

Social movements are crucial to political change. But what about the church?

Entrepreneurship in the Bible
Brian Baugus, Institute for Faith, Work, and Economics

Scripture contains several cases of entrepreneurship, but we must first make sure that we are using the proper definition of the word. Entrepreneurship is a creative act that brings higher levels of satisfaction to people, results in more order, and finds ways to create greater value than existed before.

Joe Carter Joe Carter is a Senior Editor at the Acton Institute. Joe also serves as an editor at the The Gospel Coalition, a communications specialist for the Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission of the Southern Baptist Convention, and as an adjunct professor of journalism at Patrick Henry College. He is the editor of the NIV Lifehacks Bible and co-author of How to Argue like Jesus: Learning Persuasion from History's Greatest Communicator (Crossway).

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