food plateThe government is now in the health care business. Trans fats may be on their way out, and New York is trying to tell us to stop buying buckets of soda to drink. Can you imagine a land of the “Affordable Healthy Food Act?” Jacqueline Isaacs can.

Imagine with me, a hypothetical world where a politician was running for the office of President of the United States on the platform that everyone deserved a healthy diet. Not so far-fetched of an idea. Food is definitely a necessity, and in our 21st century America, why shouldn’t everyone be able to have access to healthy food?

We are told that if you already have a healthy diet, you don’t have to worry about anything; nothing will change for you. If you like your neighborhood grocery store, then you can keep shopping at your neighborhood grocery store. Period. The only impact will be that all of us will have access to more food, healthier food and cheaper food. In fact, we are promised that the average family grocery bill will go down. A lot of people would be on board with this person’s argument.

You like those inexpensive microwave meals for your office lunch? Sorry; can’t have ‘em any more. Your employer won’t be able to give you a year-end bonus or raise; they have to provide mandated healthy meals for you while you’re at work. And, of course, someone from the government will make sure you’re making your mandated minimum purchases of healthy food every month…and expect to pay a fine if you don’t measure up.

Ha, ha. It all sounds so funny. Doesn’t it?

Read “Would You Support The Affordable Healthy Food Act?” at Values & Capitalism.

Meltdown: A Free-Market Look at Why the Stock Market Collapsed, the Economy Tanked, and Government Bailouts Will Make Things Worse

Meltdown: A Free-Market Look at Why the Stock Market Collapsed, the Economy Tanked, and Government Bailouts Will Make Things Worse

Thomas Woods busts the media myths and government spin, explains how government intervention in the economy actually caused the housing bubble, and which alternatives will help.

$21.00

  • Bill Hickman

    I don’t think this is a good analogy. The economics of the food and health care markets are totally different. We pay for health care on an insurance model controlled by almost monopolistic private companies. Those companies (before O’care) could hike prices almost without market consequence and decline to sell the product to the people who need the it the most.

    If the economics of food were similarly harsh, I think we’d have “single-payer food” in a hurry because we wouldn’t tolerate people starving.