Acton Institute Powerblog

Joseph Cardinal Ratzinger is Pope Benedict XVI

Share this article:
Join the Discussion:

God and the World: A Conversation with Peter Seewald
Joseph Cardinal Ratzinger
Ignatius Press, 2002

Comments by Dr. Samuel Gregg:
As Prefect of the Vatican’s Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger has demonstrated again and again that he is one of the world’s leading theologians. In this extended interview with the renowned German journalist, Peter Seewald, we are given an insight into Ratzinger’s thought on a range of topics fundamental to Christian belief. This includes profound meditation on the theological virtues (faith, hope, and love), Creation, Revelation, the Personhood of Christ, the Cross, the Sacraments, and the Church itself. This book is especially interesting insofar as the interviewer has only recently returned to the Catholic Faith, and is thus far from obsequious in his questions. The ensuing discussion between the once-secularist journalist and a Prince of the Church thus deeply penetrates into some of the very essences of Christian belief, and confirms Ratzinger’s reputation as a Christian critically engaged with modernity and not afraid to state where it sheds both light and darkness upon the truth revealed to man by faith and reason.

Jordan J. Ballor Jordan J. Ballor (Dr. theol., University of Zurich; Ph.D., Calvin Theological Seminary) is a senior research fellow and director of publishing at the Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, where he also serves as executive editor the Journal of Markets & Morality. He is author of Get Your Hands Dirty: Essays on Christian Social Thought (and Action) (Wipf & Stock, 2013), Covenant, Causality, and Law: A Study in the Theology of Wolfgang Musculus (Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 2012) and Ecumenical Babel: Confusing Economic Ideology and the Church's Social Witness (Christian's Library Press, 2010), as well as editor of numerous works, including Abraham Kuyper Collected Works in Public Theology. Jordan is also associate director of the Junius Institute for Digital Reformation Research at Calvin Theological Seminary. He has authored articles in academic publications such as The Journal of Religion, Scottish Journal of Theology, Reformation & Renaissance Review, and Journal of Scholarly Publishing, and has written popular pieces for newspapers including the Detroit News, Orange County Register, and The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. In 2006, Jordan was profiled in the book, The Relevant Nation: 50 Activists, Artists And Innovators Who Are Changing The World Through Faith. Jordan's scholarly interests include Reformation studies, church-state relations, theological anthropology, social ethics, theology and economics, and research methodology. Jordan is a member of the Christian Reformed Church in North America (CRCNA), and he resides in Jenison, Michigan with his wife and three children.

Comments

  • The press seems convinced that Ratzinger is conservative, despite his profound orthodoxy. I am much more inclined to believe that Cardinal Ratzinger will continue in his brilliant orthodoxy rather than taking up conservatism.

    JBP

  • It seems to me that the only way the college of cardinals could have made the media happy would have been to elect a very progressive female atheist as pope.

    I’m a protestant, but I for one am glad to see that the Cardinals chose a Catholic to serve as the next pope, and I am certain that I will find some amusement in watching the media’s Monday morning quarterbacking of this decision in the coming weeks, months, and probably years.