Acton Institute Powerblog

PowerLinks 01.24.14

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The Philosophical Basis for Religious Liberty
Michel Therrien, Crisis Magazine

We should be careful in the present public discourse around religious liberty. If we employ relativism to defend this right, we can be assured that this same rationale will come back to bite us.

A Fiscal Conservative Defends the Pope
Scott Fyall, Values & Capitalism

Fiscal conservatism and Catholicism’s teachings on helping the poor are compatible—but it is up to us to make it so.

On masculinity and the War on Poverty
Melanie Sturm, Washington Examiner

Rather than apply Band-Aids to the cancer of chronic unemployment — like unemployment-insurance extensions and minimum-wage hikes — political elites must focus on the real problem: Millions of males, especially less-educated men, are “unhitched from the engine of growth,” according to a 2011 Brookings Institution report.

Five Things Christians Need to Know about Income Inequality, and What You Can Do about It
Anne Bradley, Institute for Faith, Work, and Economics

Bringing about flourishing through good stewardship requires discerning the biblical principles that will lead us to understand whether income inequality is a problem, and if so, how we are to respond. The best way to summarize this tough topic is through these five points that are critical for Christians to understand in order to bring about greater flourishing, especially for the poor.

Joe Carter Joe Carter is a Senior Editor at the Acton Institute. Joe also serves as an editor at the The Gospel Coalition, a communications specialist for the Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission of the Southern Baptist Convention, and as an adjunct professor of journalism at Patrick Henry College. He is the editor of the NIV Lifehacks Bible and co-author of How to Argue like Jesus: Learning Persuasion from History's Greatest Communicator (Crossway).

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