Blog author: johnteevan
Friday, August 29, 2014
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In his August 24, 2014 syndicated column Scott Burns tells of a study by Dunn and Norton who give five principles for having “Happy Money.”

  1. Buy experiences not things: go to Chicago rather than buy a new stuff.
  2. Make it a treat: don’t keep ice cream in the house, make it special by anticipating going out every Tuesday night for ice cream.
  3. Buy time: we are “time poor” people so slow down and avoid expenditures that devour time.
  4. Pre-pay your vacation so you don’t worry about spending “all that money.”
  5. Invest in others: give gifts or cash or support someone on a ministry trip or hand out $20 when you feel like it.

These ideas will help remove the tendency to endless question of “Is this worth it?” Burns does not mention it, but giving money to church, mission, health, poverty, orphan care or directly to people in need is “Happy Money” as well.

Integrated Justice

Integrated Justice

Why write about social justice? Why investigate income inequality?This book discusses the topics of social justice and income inequality within an economic, philosophic, and biblical framework that leads to an understanding of integrated justice.A theme of central importance is that Christians should continue to serve the people of the world both to gain credibility as Christians and to open the door for other aspects of Christian ministry, particularly the ones related to the Great Commission’s call to disciple-making and church-planting.What key insights should the reader look for? First, many evangelical Christians have come lately to the issue of social justice. We are catching up and finding our role in the conversation. Second, while justice is a significant biblical value, it is always surpassed by God’s grace. We must everywhere and always be ministers of grace in order to be good servants of God. If we follow that path, we will pursue integrated justice.