Posts by Allyson Wierenga

Conflict and resolution: Charles de Gaulle’s understanding of ‘nation’

In an article written for Public Discourse, Samuel Gregg. Acton’s director of research, reviews Julian Jackson’s recent book about General Charles de Gaulle. The book clearly communicates the idea that “de Gaulle’s conception of France as a nation had a very specific character.” “De Gaulle” is a historical biography, not a commentary on present-day debates concerning globalization or nationalism. Continue Reading...

Reframing the free trade argument

Historically, arguments for American free trade have often been criticized or met with skepticism. However, what would happen if these arguments were reframed to suggest the economic and political benefits free trade can offer? Continue Reading...

Sentimentalism in the Church: a modern epidemic

Involvement in the Christian Church should never be characterized by self-centeredness. Christianity, by definition, is a religion that emphasizes sacrifice and selflessness. However, a recent shift towards religious sentimentalism raises questions about the desire for truth in the modern-day. Continue Reading...

Does social media compromise free will?

In an article for Law and Liberty, Michael Matheson Miller, a research fellow at the Acton Institute, reflects on the book “10 Arguments for Deleting Your Social Media Accounts Right Now.” Written by Jaron Lanier, a “technologist and musician”, “10 Arguments” shares thought-provoking ideas about the dangers and risks involved with social media. Continue Reading...

The nation-state and security of freedom

In a recent article for Law and Liberty, Samuel Gregg, Acton’s Director of Research, reviews French political scientist Gil Delannoi’s new book Le nation contre le nationalisme. “Since 2016,” Gregg writes, “it has become evident that millions of people are not content to be herded, sheep-like, by intellectuals, techno-utopians, and supranational bureaucrats down the path of global governance. Continue Reading...

Who is John Rawls and why should you care?

This is a guest post for the Acton PowerBlog By Kevin Brown Imagine asking a diverse group of rich, poor, attractive, unattractive, intelligent, unintelligent, white, non-white, educated, and non-educated — what makes a society just.  Continue Reading...