Joe Carter

Joe Carter is a Senior Editor at the Acton Institute. Joe also serves as an editor at the The Gospel Coalition, a communications specialist for the Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission of the Southern Baptist Convention, and as an adjunct professor of journalism at Patrick Henry College. He is the editor of the NIV Lifehacks Bible and co-author of How to Argue like Jesus: Learning Persuasion from History's Greatest Communicator (Crossway).

Posts by Joe Carter

PowerLinks 05.16.18

There’s No Such Thing as Moderate Marxism Clive Crook, Bloomberg From the outset, violence and totalitarianism were hard-wired into Marx’s political project. Majorities See Government Efforts to Protect the Environment as Insufficient Cary Funk, Brian Kennedy, Meg Hefferon and Mark Strauss, Pew Research Pockets of partisan agreement over renewables despite wide divides over increasing fossil fuels and effects of climate change. Continue Reading...

How geography affects economic growth

Note: This is post #78 in a weekly video series on basic economics. You could fit most of the U.S., China, India, and a lot of Europe, into Africa. But if you compare Africa to Europe, Europe has two to three times the length of coastline that Africa. Continue Reading...

PowerLinks 05.15.18

US and EU agree on push for religious freedom ADF International How should we counter the steady rise of religious persecution of Christians and other religious minorities around the world? 18 Hayek Quotes That Show the Importance of Liberty Gary M. Continue Reading...

PowerLinks 05.14.18

The quiet triumph of economics Diego Zuluaga, CapX Think of economics not as a recipe for the good life, but as an insurance policy against bad ideas. Americans are generally positive about free trade agreements, more critical of tariff increases Bradley Jones, Pew Research Americans’ views of free trade agreements, which turned more negative during the 2016 presidential campaign, are now about as positive as they were prior to the campaign. Continue Reading...

Dalio’s animated adventure in common grace-infused wisdom

Ray Dalio is a fascinating character. Founder of the “world’s richest and strangest hedge fund,” he’s been dubbed the “Steve Jobs of investing” and “Wall Street’s oddest duck.” He’s currently #26 on Forbes list of richest people in America and Time magazine once included him on their list of the world’s 100 most influential people. Continue Reading...

PowerLinks 05.11.18

Honoring the Faith and Work of Moms Anne Bradley, Institute for Faith, Work, and Economics The relationship between mother and child changes over time, but it is no less important. Fifty years on, The Population Bomb is as wrong as ever Marian L. Continue Reading...

Liberalism needs natural law

The great British political thinker Edmund Burke regarded what some call “liberalism” today as incomprehensible, unworkable and unjust in the absence of widespread commitment to natural law. A similar argument can be made in our own time, says Acton research director Samuel Gregg: Without natural law foundations, for instance, how can we determine what is and isn’t a right other than appeals to raw power or utility, neither of which can provide a principled case for rights? Continue Reading...

PowerLinks 05.10.18

The Unintended Consequences of the Welfare State on the Human Spirit Walter E. Williams, The Daily Signal Before the welfare state, charity embodied both a sense of gratitude on the behalf of the recipient and magnanimity on the behalves of donors. Continue Reading...

How Kuyper can bring evangelicals and Catholics together

Have Catholics sacrificed the integrity of their faith tradition by allying with conservative evangelicals (like me)? Matthew Walther, a national correspondent at The Week, thinks so. Walther claims the alliance between Catholics and evangelical Protestants was born of supposedly shared values. Continue Reading...