Joe Carter

Joe Carter is a Senior Editor at the Acton Institute. Joe also serves as an editor at the The Gospel Coalition, a communications specialist for the Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission of the Southern Baptist Convention, and as an adjunct professor of journalism at Patrick Henry College. He is the editor of the NIV Lifehacks Bible and co-author of How to Argue like Jesus: Learning Persuasion from History's Greatest Communicator (Crossway).

Posts by Joe Carter

PowerLinks 06.19.17

How Science Is Losing Its Humanity Ron Clutz, Science Matters Today science and the “philosophy of mind”—its thoughtful assistant, which is sometimes smarter than the boss—are threatening Western culture with the exact opposite of humanism. Continue Reading...
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Let’s bring back the stigma of being a ‘Deadbeat Dad’

“Deadbeat Dads”—absent fathers who don’t provide financial support for their children—are one of the most significant factors contributing to child poverty in America. So why do some single women have children outside of marriage when they know they will receive little to no support from the child’s father? Continue Reading...

Are pastors particularly partisan?

A new paper released this week by a pair of political scientists claims, as The New York Times reports, that, “pastors are even more politically divided than the congregants in their denomination.” As the abstract of the paper states: Pastors are important civic leaders within their churches and communities. Continue Reading...

PowerLinks 06.15.17

Is America Encouraging the Wrong Kind of Entrepreneurship? Robert E. LitanIan Hathaway, Harvard Business Review Baumol was worried, however, by a very different sort of entrepreneur: the “unproductive” ones, who exploit special relationships with the government to construct regulatory moats, secure public spending for their own benefit, or bend specific rules to their will, in the process stifling competition to create advantage for their firms. Continue Reading...
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The cooperative magic of work

“When people work together,” says Dylan Pahman in this week’s Acton Commentary, “they are able to multiply the fruits of their labors far beyond what they could each do alone.” “Work,” wrote the Reformed theologian Lester DeKoster, “is the form in which we make ourselves useful to others.” I like this definition because it puts things in a realistic, everyday perspective. Continue Reading...

PowerLinks 06.14.17

California’s descent to socialism Joel Kotkin, Orange County Register California is widely celebrated as the fount of technical, cultural and political innovation. Now we seem primed to outdo even ourselves, creating a new kind of socialism that, in the end, more resembles feudalism than social democracy. Continue Reading...
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A Christian defense of capitalism

Humanity knows just two theoretical forms of organizing public interactions, says Alex Tokarev. All real socio-economic systems that have evolved through the centuries are a mix of the two opposite ideological concepts: One of the systems uses political coercion. Continue Reading...

What the flu can teach us about economics

Note: This is post #37 in a weekly video series on basic microeconomics. What can the flu teach us about economics? In this video, Alex Tabarrok of Marginal Revolution University explains how vaccines produce positive externalities that help people stay healthy. Continue Reading...

PowerLinks 06.13.17

Christians faced widespread harassment in 2015, but mostly in Christian-majority countries Katayoun Kishi, Pew Research Christians were harassed by governments or social groups in a total of 128 countries in 2015 – more countries than any other religious group, according to the report. Continue Reading...
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