Joe Carter

Joe Carter is a Senior Editor at the Acton Institute. Joe also serves as an editor at the The Gospel Coalition, a communications specialist for the Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission of the Southern Baptist Convention, and as an adjunct professor of journalism at Patrick Henry College. He is the editor of the NIV Lifehacks Bible and co-author of How to Argue like Jesus: Learning Persuasion from History's Greatest Communicator (Crossway).

Posts by Joe Carter

PowerLinks 11.07.17

At Vatican, ‘Tenets of Faith’ Seen as Crucial in Climate Change Effort Elisabetta Povoledo, New York Times Religious leaders need to tell congregations that global warming can affect not just the environment, but also the spread of diseases and other threats to human health, participants said at a Vatican conference on Saturday on climate change, an issue that has been a priority of Pope Francis. Continue Reading...
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PowerLinks 11.04.17

No Matter How You Measure It, More People Are Escaping Poverty Than Ever Marian L. Tupy, FEE The world’s poorest region is catching up with the world average at a very fast pace. Continue Reading...
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From the Reformation to Austrian economics

The implications of the Reformation are more than ecclesiastical or theological, says Timothy Terrell, professor of economics at Wofford College in Spartanburg, South Carolina. They include shifts in economic thought as well, and Protestant ideas have had a lasting impact on our way of thinking about markets and liberty. Continue Reading...

PowerLinks 11.03.17

The Right Side of History: How ‘God-Given Rights’ and American Exceptionalism Are Inseparable Jarrett Stepman and Fred Lucas, The Daily Signal Thomas Jefferson articulated the concept of individual, God-given rights in the Declaration of Independence. Continue Reading...
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PowerLinks 11.02.17

500 years after the Reformation, 5 facts about Protestants around the world Neha Sahgal, Pew Research Five centuries later, global Protestant Christianity looks very different than it did at its inception. Continue Reading...
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Americans would probably ban hateful speech—if we could agree on what speech is hateful

A slight majority of Americans oppose banning hateful and offensive speech—but mostly because we can’t agree on what speech is hateful and offensive. That’s a key takeaway from the Cato Institute’s new survey report, “The State of Free Speech and Tolerance in America.” The findings in almost every category are distressing for those who abhor offensive speech but believe it should remain legal to express such sentiments in the public square. Continue Reading...

PowerLinks 11.01.17

The Secularization of Vocation Jordan J. Ballor, Public Discourse On the 500th anniversary of the Protestant Reformation, it is worth returning to the thought of Martin Luther, particularly his understanding of vocation. Continue Reading...
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