Joe Carter

Joe Carter is a Senior Editor at the Acton Institute. Joe also serves as an editor at the The Gospel Coalition, a communications specialist for the Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission of the Southern Baptist Convention, and as an adjunct professor of journalism at Patrick Henry College. He is the editor of the NIV Lifehacks Bible and co-author of How to Argue like Jesus: Learning Persuasion from History's Greatest Communicator (Crossway).

Posts by Joe Carter

PowerLinks – 01.09.13

Man Offers Own Mountain Of Proof Against Russia’s U.S. Adoption Ban Richard Solash, Radio Free Europe D’Jamoos is one of several disabled U.S. adoptees from Russia who have taken on activist roles in recent weeks, protesting their birth country’s ban on American adoptions. Continue Reading...

How to Develop a Christian Mind in Business School (Part III)

Note: This is the third in a series on developing a Christian mind in business school. You can find the intro and links to all previous posts here. When people ask me what business school was like, I’m tempted to say, “A lot like a medieval university.” Unfortunately, that comparison makes people think b-school is dark, musty, and full of monks—which is not quite what I mean. Continue Reading...

Three Ways to Defend the Free Market

Nicholas Freiling offers three helpful suggestions for how advocates of liberty can defend the free market: 1. Raising questions is always better than giving answers. Capitalism defends itself. It is logical, coherent and well-supported. Continue Reading...

PowerLinks – 01.08.13

The Dangers of Quasi-Capitalism Howard Husock, National Affairs Pointing out the inherent pitfalls of the quasi-capitalist approach is necessary in order to debunk it, but not sufficient. Those who would defend traditional capitalism must also address this new movement’s central assumption: that traditional capitalism is an anti-social activity predicated on private gain at public expense. Continue Reading...

Free Speech Still Not Free on College Campuses

Even though the crowds stop paying attention, most fads never completely disappear. Just like Beanie Babies, Furbies, grunge music never really went away, some other 1990s fads—like campus speech codes and absurd political correctness—still haunt us: From free speech codes and zones that quarantine unpopular speech to freshman orientation programs that force a left-wing world view on impressionable students to outright censorship and threats by Administrators to expel students and fire professors, Lukianoff’s new book, Unlearning Liberty, details dozens of blatant violations of the First Amendment and due process. Continue Reading...

PowerLinks – 01.07.13

California’s Blue Utopia Robert J. Cristiano, New Geography The number 1 topic of conversation amongst the despised 1% in California today is when you are leaving California or whether you can leave. Continue Reading...

There Are No Ideas Too Silly for Politicians

Remember last month when we discussed the “platinum coin option”? If you’ve forgotten already, it was the ridiculous idea that President Obama could have the U.S. Mint produce a pair of trillion-dollar platinum coins and deposit them with the Federal Reserve to pay off the national deficit. Continue Reading...

‘The Most Radical Form of Privatisation’

When Christians are tempted to despair over our seeming inability to make significant cultural changes in America, there is one word that should give us reason to be optimistic: homeschooling. As The Economist notes: Three decades ago home schooling was illegal in 30 states. Continue Reading...

PowerLinks – 01.14.13

The Courts Are Going To Decide Whether Corporations Have A Right To ‘Practice’ Religion Erin Fuchs, Business Insider While the Supreme Court refused to grant an emergency appeal, the court said the question of whether corporations have religious rights is unsettled and suggested the issue could eventually reach the high court, Lyle Denniston pointed out in the Constitution Daily. Continue Reading...

Evaluating the Emancipation Proclamation

One hundred and fifty years have passed since President Abraham Lincoln issues one of the most extraordinary proclamations in our nation’s history. The Emancipation Proclamation declared: That on the first day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, all persons held as slaves within any State or designated part of a State, the people whereof shall then be in rebellion against the United States, shall be then, thenceforward, and forever free; and the Executive Government of the United States, including the military and naval authority thereof, will recognize and maintain the freedom of such persons, and will do no act or acts to repress such persons, or any of them, in any efforts they may make for their actual freedom. Continue Reading...