Joe Carter

Joe Carter is a Senior Editor at the Acton Institute. Joe also serves as an editor at the The Gospel Coalition, a communications specialist for the Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission of the Southern Baptist Convention, and as an adjunct professor of journalism at Patrick Henry College. He is the editor of the NIV Lifehacks Bible and co-author of How to Argue like Jesus: Learning Persuasion from History's Greatest Communicator (Crossway).

Posts by Joe Carter

5 Facts about Thanksgiving

Tomorrow, Americans celebrate a national holiday set aside to give thanks for the blessings of the preceding year. But there is more to Thanksgiving than you may realize. Here are five facts you should know about the holiday: 1. Continue Reading...

PowerLinks 11.21.18

Why Limited Government Is Integral to Biblical Flourishing Anne Bradley, Institute for Faith, Work, and Economics Governments do not create wealth; they are only capable of taking and transferring wealth. Betsy DeVos Is Protecting Civil Liberties on Campus Ramesh Ponnuru, Bloomberg Opinion A change in how sexual-harassment cases are handled is a victory for due process. Continue Reading...

PowerLinks 11.20.18

Aquinas looks at bitcoin Karl D. Stephan, Mercatornet Is there anything intrinsically wrong with cryptocurrency? DC’s Ban on Plastic Straws Extends Beyond Restaurants and Bars to Churches and Day Care Centers Tristan Justice, The Daily Signal The District of Columbia is set to implement a new ban on single-use plastic straws and coffee stirrers. Continue Reading...

PowerLinks 11.19.18

Religious liberty seen as key to societal advancement around the world Kurt Jensen, Catholic News Service The impact of the International Religious Freedom Act over the past 20 years “has, in many ways, been revolutionary,” said Thomas Farr, president of the Religious Freedom Institute in Washington. Continue Reading...

Trade, nations, and war in an enlightened age

Between 1776 and 1815, Britain was at peace for just 10 years, notes Samuel Gregg, Acton’s Director of Research. Reading the Scottish defense of free trade without this in mind is a mistake: It’s easy to forget that the tremendous intellectual creativity flowing from the Scottish Enlightenment occurred against a background of war. Continue Reading...

PowerLinks 11.16.18

Growth is the ultimate weapon in the fight to end child labour Marian L. Tupy, CapX Economic growth, which was key to eliminating child labour in the developed world, can achieve the same outcome in the developing one. Continue Reading...

PowerLinks 11.15.18

The Challenge of Curbing Corporate Subsidies Reihan Salam, National Review State and local governments offer development incentives to big businesses. Ending the practice won’t be easy. Why Teen Suicide Is Lower in States That Have More School Choice Kerry McDonald, FEE New research links school choice with improved childhood mental health. Continue Reading...

Russell Kirk: Where does virtue come from?

“How can human society form and raise up virtuous people?” asks Barton Gingerich in this week’s Acton Commentary. As Gingerich notes, Russell Kirk explored this perennial question in a 1982 essay titled, “Virtue: Can It Be Taught?” Kirk defined virtues as “the qualities of full humanity: strength, courage, capacity, worth, manliness, moral excellence,” particularly qualities of “moral goodness: the practice of moral duties and the conformity of life to the moral law; uprightness; rectitude.” Despite modern attempts to supplant vigorous, active “virtue” with passive “integrity,” people “possessed of an energetic virtue” are still needed, particularly in more turbulent times. Continue Reading...

Why we need a better way to measure poverty

Note: This article is part of the ‘Principles Project,’ a list of principles, axioms, and beliefs that undergird a Christian view of economics, liberty, and virtue. Click here to read the introduction and other posts in this series. Continue Reading...