Joe Carter

Joe Carter is a Senior Editor at the Acton Institute. Joe also serves as an editor at the The Gospel Coalition, a communications specialist for the Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission of the Southern Baptist Convention, and as an adjunct professor of journalism at Patrick Henry College. He is the editor of the NIV Lifehacks Bible and co-author of How to Argue like Jesus: Learning Persuasion from History's Greatest Communicator (Crossway).

Posts by Joe Carter

How God makes a smartphone

“Everybody has a cell phone,” Steve Jobs told John Lasseter, chief creative officer at Pixar, “but I don’t know one person who likes their cell phone.” The frustrated CEO of Apple decided to do something about the problem, which lead to one of the greatest products of the modern age. Continue Reading...

PowerLinks 06.29.17

How Hip-Hop Is Teaching High Schoolers About the Free Market Walter E. Williams, The Daily Signal An innovative high school teacher in Wilmington, Delaware, is using rap to teach students the principles of economics. Continue Reading...
PowerLinks

Understanding the President’s Cabinet: OMB Director

Note: This is the post #22 in a weekly series of explanatory posts on the officials and agencies included in the President’s Cabinet. See the series introduction here.   Cabinet position: Director of the Office of Management and Budget Department:  Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Current Director: Mick Mulvaney Department Mission: “The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) serves the President of the United States in overseeing the implementation of his vision across the Executive Branch. Continue Reading...

Why Seattle’s minimum wage law is now destroying wages

“The city of Seattle has the highest minimum wage in the United States,” notes Dylan Pahman in this week’s Acton Commentary. “While economists and policy-makers continue to debate the issue, a recent working paper from researchers at the University of Washington (UW) raises serious questions about the effectiveness of minimum wage hikes.” In short, the study concludes that the “increase to $13 reduced hours worked in low-wage jobs by around 9 percent, while hourly wages in such jobs increased by around 3 percent.” The researchers explain, “The reduction in hours would cost the average employee $179 per month, while the wage increase would recoup only $54 of this loss, leaving a net loss of $125 per month (6.6%), which is sizable for a low-wage worker.” If this study holds up to scrutiny, it will show that, contrary to their intention, those who hoped to help workers at the bottom have actually made things worse. Continue Reading...

PowerLinks 06.28.17

People Differences vs. Place Differences: What Causes Social Mobility? Robert VerBruggen, Family Studies Can you improve a poor child’s life by moving his family to a better place? Low-skill workers aren’t actually the ones most threatened by robots Dan Kopf, Quartz There are a lot of jobs that can only be completed with significant training, but don’t involve much critical thinking once the skill is learned—machine operators and office clerks, for examples. Continue Reading...
PowerLinks

Bees, Pollination, and the Coase Theorem

Note: This is post #39 in a weekly video series on basic microeconomics. In this video by Marginal Revolution University, economist Alex Tabarrok shows how bees and pollination demonstrate the Coase Theorem in action: when transaction costs are low and property rights are clearly defined, private arrangements ensure that the market works even when there are externalities. Continue Reading...

PowerLinks 06.27.17

The Supreme Court Strikes Down a Major Church-State Barrier Emma Green, The Atlantic Trinity Lutheran v. Comer is the first-ever case to hold that governments have to provide money directly to a house of worship. Continue Reading...
PowerLinks

PowerLinks 06.26.17

Can Jonathan Haidt Calm the Culture Wars? Evan R. Goldstein, The Chronicle of Higher Education “There is a horror of being associated with anything or anyone conservative,” [Bromwich] says, calling it “a mark of the timidity of the academic personality in our time. Continue Reading...
PowerLinks