Joe Carter

Joe Carter is a Senior Editor at the Acton Institute. Joe also serves as an editor at the The Gospel Coalition, a communications specialist for the Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission of the Southern Baptist Convention, and as an adjunct professor of journalism at Patrick Henry College. He is the editor of the NIV Lifehacks Bible and co-author of How to Argue like Jesus: Learning Persuasion from History's Greatest Communicator (Crossway).

Posts by Joe Carter

Lord Acton’s judgment on pope and king

“Acton’s ideal of the historian as judge, as the upholder of the moral standard, is the most noble ideal ever proposed for the historian,” says Josef L. Altholz in this week’s Acton Commentary, “and it is an ideal that has been rejected, perhaps with grudging respect, by all historians, including myself.” We workaday historians can have no higher ideal than Acton’s second choice, impartiality or objectivity. Continue Reading...

PowerLinks 02.15.17

Does Religion Have a Place in Public Schools? Benjamin Justice and Colin Macleod, The Atlantic “The question of what to do with religion in school-choice programs is how, or whether, to keep the baby while ditching the bathwater.” Lawmakers and Regulators Act Like They Hate Farmers Markets Baylen Linnekin , Reason.com Is the purist or the modern vision of a farmers market the proper one? Continue Reading...

5 Facts about Frederick Douglass

February 14 is the chosen birthday of Frederick Douglass (1818-1895), one of America’s greatest champions of individual liberty. Here are five facts you should know about this writer, orator, statesman, and abolitionist: Portrait of Frederick Douglass / Public domain 1. Continue Reading...

When Nixon tried to control prices

Note: This is post #21 in a weekly video series on basic microeconomics. President Nixon had a problem—inflation was out of control. So in 1971 he attempted to implement a drastic solution: he declared price increases illegal. Continue Reading...

PowerLinks 02.14.17

Your Work Is a Cursed Blessing Justin Dillehay, TGC Work is a blessing—few things are as fulfilling as a job well done. And yet it can also feel like a curse—how many people do you know who hate their job? Continue Reading...

Prosperity matters more than social mobility or income inequality

Embed from Getty Images   Social mobility is the ability of an individual or family to improve (or lower) their economic status. The two main types of social mobility are intergenerational (i.e., a person is better off than their parents or grandparents) or intragenerational (i.e., income changes within a person or group’s lifetime).  Continue Reading...

PowerLinks 02.13.17

The Gorsuch Confirmation And The Finnis Connection Steven Hayward, PowerLine Never heard of John Finnis? I predict you will in the confirmation hearings. And the likelihood is that Democrats will make fools of themselves, or at the very least unwittingly reveal their essential contempt for the American Founding, and the only question is whether Gorsuch, who appears to be a gentleman of the first order, will restrain himself from embarrassing them out of the political calculus of merely wanting to get to a confirmation vote with the least amount of controversy. Continue Reading...

PowerLinks 02.11.17

Christian charged with blasphemy, 106 Muslims acquitted Morning Star A 70-year-old Christian in Pakistan was jailed on blasphemy charges on the same day 106 Muslims accused in a 2013 attack on a Christian colony were acquitted. Continue Reading...

Business for the common good

“If you are a young person saying ‘I want to go into ministry because I want to change culture,’ how would delete the word ministry and replace it with business?” asks Greg Thornbury, president of The King’s College in New York City. Continue Reading...

PowerLinks 02.10.17

Confessions of a Catholic convert to capitalism Arthur C. Brooks, America “The mind of man plans his way, but the Lord directs his steps” (Prov 16:9). God puts the truth before us in unexpected places, I have learned. Continue Reading...