Joe Carter

Joe Carter is a Senior Editor at the Acton Institute. Joe also serves as an editor at the The Gospel Coalition, a communications specialist for the Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission of the Southern Baptist Convention, and as an adjunct professor of journalism at Patrick Henry College. He is the editor of the NIV Lifehacks Bible and co-author of How to Argue like Jesus: Learning Persuasion from History's Greatest Communicator (Crossway).

Posts by Joe Carter

PowerLinks 04.22.16

Americans average 35 hours a year filling out government forms Bonnie Kristian, The Week The federal government interacts with citizens by means of about 23,000 separate forms, finds an analysis of Washington’s paperwork situation by the American Action Forum. Continue Reading...

Distributism Is the Future (That Few People Want)

Over the years, many of us here at Acton have been engaged in long-running (and mostly congenial) feud with distributists. Family squabbles can often be the most heated, and that is true of this rivalry between the Christian champions of distributism and the Christian champions of free markets here at  the Acton Institute. Continue Reading...

PowerLinks 04.21.16

The Downside of the Tax Credit That Keeps Millions Out of Poverty David Lapp, Family Studies The tax credit that keeps millions of Americans out of poverty also sends many into a boom-and-bust financial cycle. Continue Reading...

Why It Was Always Going to Be Tubman on Our Money

Last Summer I predicted that Harriet Tubman would be replacing Alexander Hamilton on the $10 bill. I was almost right. She’ll be replacing Andrew Jackson. The U.S. Treasury announced last year that the $10 bill is the next paper currency scheduled for a major redesign — a process that takes years because of the anti-counterfeiting technology involved — and will feature a “notable woman.” The new ten will be unveiled in 2020, the 100th anniversary of the passage of the nineteenth amendment, which gave women the right to vote. Continue Reading...

Time and Eternity: The Abiding Profit

“The temporal achievements of science, technology, inventions and the like also have a divine significance,” writes Abraham Kuyper in this week’s Acton Commentary, an excerpt from Common Grace: God’s Gifts for a Fallen World. Continue Reading...

PowerLinks 04.20.16

How To Use Documentary In Addressing Poverty, Foreign Aid, And Compassion The Federalist Co-producer, Mark Weber, explains how “Poverty, Inc.” interviewed over 200 people in 20 countries to understand foreign aid. Continue Reading...

What Christians (Should) Mean When We Talk About Conscience

A new Pew Research survey finds that the majority of American Catholics  (73 percent) say they rely “a great deal” on their own conscience when facing difficult moral problems. Conscience was turned to more often than the three other sources — Catholic Church’s teachings (21 percent), the Bible (15 percent) or the pope (11 percent) — combined. Continue Reading...

PowerLinks 04.19.16

The Surprising Link between James Madison, Baptists, and True Religious Liberty Hugh Whelchel, Institute for Faith, Work, and Economics Madison understood that religious liberty means more than having the freedom to worship. Continue Reading...

Should We Give Smartphones to the Homeless?

Across the globe, extreme poverty has been reduced by the advent and ubiquity of a simple tool: cell phones. As USAID says, mobile phones “fundamentally transform the way people in the developing world interact with one another and their governments, and access basic health, education, business and financial services.” Could the same technology that is alleviating extreme poverty around the world also be used to help solve America’s homeless problem? Continue Reading...