Joe Carter

Joe Carter is a Senior Editor at the Acton Institute. Joe also serves as an editor at the The Gospel Coalition, a communications specialist for the Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission of the Southern Baptist Convention, and as an adjunct professor of journalism at Patrick Henry College. He is the editor of the NIV Lifehacks Bible and co-author of How to Argue like Jesus: Learning Persuasion from History's Greatest Communicator (Crossway).

Posts by Joe Carter

The mayor who found a simple way to help the homeless: give them jobs

The scene can be found in almost every major U.S. city: a panhandler stands on a street corner holding a sign saying, “Need a job.” But one U.S. mayor decided to try something different — by taking them up on the offer and give the person a job One year ago Berry started a campaign to curb panhandling, called There’s a Better Way. Continue Reading...

PowerLinks 08.16.16

Why You Spend Two Hours To See Your Doctor For 8 Minutes Michael T. Hamilton, The Federalist Most likely, the culprit isn’t your doctor, but a dastardly duo: federal reporting requirements and the industry’s entrenched health insurance model. Continue Reading...

PowerLinks 08.15.16

The Global Poor Desperately Need a Thing You Can’t Taste or Touch: Property Rights Michael Matheson Miller, The Stream Rio’s poor lack a much more important ticket than one to the Olympics. Continue Reading...

PowerLinks 08.12.16

Black Pastors Are Breaking the Law to Get Hillary Clinton Elected Emma Green, The Atlantic According to a new survey from Pew Research Center, roughly 9 percent of people who have attended religious services in the last few months have heard clergy speak out in favor of a political candidate, and roughly 11 percent have heard clergy speak in opposition. Continue Reading...

PowerLinks 08.11.16

Here Are 7 Ways Free Trade Has Helped Michigan Tori Whiting, The Daily Signal In 2010, the Michigan economy was on the rocks—715,000 people were out of work, and the Great Lakes State’s gross domestic product had contracted by 7.6 percent by the time the recession ended. Continue Reading...

Technology seen, and unseen

Although not everyone see its, technological progress has meant progress in human flourishing, notes Dylan Pahman in this week’s Acton Commentary. To answer the Luddites, first of all we must acknowledge that there is truth to what is seen. Continue Reading...