Joe Carter

Joe Carter is a Senior Editor at the Acton Institute. Joe also serves as an editor at the The Gospel Coalition, a communications specialist for the Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission of the Southern Baptist Convention, and as an adjunct professor of journalism at Patrick Henry College. He is the editor of the NIV Lifehacks Bible and co-author of How to Argue like Jesus: Learning Persuasion from History's Greatest Communicator (Crossway).

Posts by Joe Carter

PowerLinks 10.19.15

The Case for Private Property: A (New) Natural Law Analysis Samuel Gregg, Public Discourse At a time when debates about economic inequality occupy significant attention in the public square, Adam MacLeod offers a fresh way forward for thinking about private property and its contribution to the common good by rooting property rights in a robust account of freedom and human flourishing. Continue Reading...

Who Protects Us From Government Polluters?

“The rules don’t apply to me,” is a favorite maxim of toddlers, narcissists, and government officials. This is especially true of the legislative branch, which frequently exempts itself—and its 30,000 employees—from federal laws that apply to the rest of us. Continue Reading...

PowerLinks 10.16.15

A Biblical Answer to Poverty: God’s People and the Marketplace Ed Stetzer, Christianity Today We are eradicating poverty at faster rates than any economist would have predicted 30 years ago. R.I.P., welfare? Continue Reading...

PowerLinks 10.16.15

Louisiana’s School Choice Experiment Could Be In Danger Kevin Boyd, Opportunity Lives Since Hurricane Katrina devastated much of Southeast Louisiana a decade ago, the state has on embarked one of the most aggressive school choice and charter school experiments in the country. Continue Reading...

There is No Such Thing as ‘The Poor’

“With the news this week that Angus Deaton of Princeton University had won the economics Nobel,” says Victor V. Claar in this week’s Acton Commentary, “the question of how best to help the poor in developing nations takes on a greater level of urgency.” When it comes to understanding the specifics of global poverty, Deaton’s achievements are especially impressive. Continue Reading...

Does Bitcoin Have an Energy Problem?

Over the past couple of years I’ve fallen into a habit of infrequently pointing out the flaws, dangers, and threats to Bitcoin as a viable cryptocurrency. While I find the experiment in alternative currency intriguing, I’m just as intrigued by criticisms made against Bitcoin. Continue Reading...

PowerLinks 10.14.15

Conflict drives ‘alarming’ global hunger, report shows Mark Kinver, BBC Conflict is “development in reverse” and a key factor that is leaving almost 800 million without enough food, the 2015 Global Hunger Index has concluded. Continue Reading...

6 Quotes: Angus Deaton on Poverty

Yesterday, Princeton economist Angus Deaton won the Nobel prize in economic sciences for his work on “analysis of consumption, poverty, and welfare.” In honor of this recognition, here are six quotes by Deaton on poverty: On poverty measurements: “Poverty lines are as much political as scientific constructions.” On measuring global poverty: “Measuring poverty at the local level is straightforward, at the national level it is hard but manageable, but at the level of the world as a whole it is extremely difficult, so much so that some people argue that it is not worth the effort.” On the international poverty line: “Focusing on the number of people who are below the line is like chasing an unicorn through the woods. Continue Reading...

PowerLinks 10.13.15

On Tyrannical Experts and Expert Tyrants Angus Deaton, Review of Austrian Economics We should indeed champion the rights of the poor and their full participation in a democratic state. But it is too optimistic to believe that rights and democracy by themselves will guarantee growth and prosperity, and the argument that rights and democracy are both necessary and sufficient for population health is largely wishful thinking. Continue Reading...