Category: Acton Media

dncplatformEarlier this week, I talked about the religious and economic implications of the RNC platform. As the DNC wraps up, it is time to examine the relevant points of the Democratic platform.

Innovation & Entrepreneurship

We need an economy that prioritizes long-term investment over short-term profit-seeking, rewards the common interest over self-interest, and promotes innovation and entrepreneurship.

Minimum Wage

Democrats believe that the current minimum wage is a starvation wage and must be increased to a living wage. No one who works full time should have to raise a family in poverty. We believe that Americans should earn at least $15 an hour and have the right to form or join a union. We applaud the approaches taken by states like New York and California. We should raise and index the minimum wage, give all Americans the ability to join a union regardless of where they work, and create new ways for workers to have power in the economy. We also support creating one fair wage for all workers by ending the sub-minimum wage for tipped workers and people with disabilities.

Democrats support a model employer executive order or some other vehicle to leverage federal dollars to support employers who provide their workers with a living wage, good benefits, and the opportunity to form a union. The $1 trillion spent annually by the government on contracts, loans, and grants should be used to support good jobs that rebuild the middle class.

Poverty

We believe that today’s extreme level of income and wealth inequality—where the majority of the economic gains go to the top one percent and the richest 20 people in our country own more wealth than the bottom 150 million—makes our economy weaker, our communities poorer, and our politics poisonous.

We reaffirm our commitment to eliminate poverty. Democrats will develop a national strategy to combat poverty, coordinated across all levels of government. We will direct more federal resources to lifting up communities that have been left out and left behind, such as the 10-20-30 model, which directs 10 percent of program funds to communities where at least 20 percent of the population has been living below the poverty line for 30 years or more. We will also focus on communities that suffer from persistent poverty, including empowerment zones and areas that targeted government data indicate are in persistent poverty.

Democrats will protect proven programs like the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)—our nation’s most important anti-hunger program—that help struggling families put food on the table. We will also help people grow their skills through jobs and skills training opportunities.

Religious Liberty

Opposes attempts to impose a religious test to bar immigrants or refugees from entering the United States.

Supports a “progressive vision of religious freedom that respects pluralism and rejects the misuse of religion to discriminate.”

Supports protecting both Muslims and religious minorities and the “fundamental right of freedom of religion” in the Middle East. (Read more here)

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In the wake of last week’s Republican National Convention, and in the midst of the Democratic National Convention, it is more important than ever for voters to be thoroughly educated on each party’s platform going into the general election season. In two recent posts on the Republican Party platform, (part one, part two) Joe Carter provides a comprehensive summary of the Republican Party’s main stances (we’ll look at some of the Democratic Party’s platform issues in a later post). Some of the highlights of the platform include: (more…)

See more at: http://tinyurl.com/hrl94u7

On sale now at the Acton Book Store

The role of economic liberty in contributing to human flourishing and the common good remains deeply underappreciated, even by those who are dedicated to religious liberty.

Samuel Gregg

Gregg is a contributor of One and Indivisible: The Relationship Between Religious and Economic Freedom, on sale now in the Acton Book Shop. Compiled by Kevin Schmiesing, the book contains 13 essays from highly acclaimed authors, speakers, and religious leaders, including Michael Matheson Miller, Anielka Münkel Olson, and Michael Novak. The essays describe the major events and trends that inspired an ambitious three-year program of conferences organized by the Acton Institute designed to bring a wide variety of scholars together to discuss one important theme: What is the relationship between economic and religious freedom? (more…)

unnamedPoverty Inc.an award-winning documentary that grew out of the Acton Institute’s PovertyCure initiative, is now available on Netflix.

During the past year the film has been in over 300 screenings around the world attended by more than 21,000 people. But now we have an opportunity to spread  the key message of the film to a larger audience: the most effective solutions to poverty lie in unleashing entrepreneurs to find new, innovative, and efficient ways to meet people’s needs.

Please help us spread the word by telling your friends, co-workers, and family about Poverty, Inc.’s availability on Netflix. And if you don’t have Netflix you can also find the documentary for sale or rent on Amazon Instant Video, iTunes, YouTube, Google Play, PlayStation Store, Vimeo On Demand, or Vudu.

 

 

Blog author: jcarter
Monday, June 13, 2016
By

actonuThis is the week for the annual Acton University, a unique educational experience focused on the intersection of liberty and morality. Here are five facts you should know about Acton U.

1. Acton University is a four day annual conference on liberty, faith and free-market economics held in Grand Rapids, Michigan.

2. Each even includes nine sessions in which attendees can create a customized learning path from 100+ courses taught by 55+ international, world class experts.

3. The conference is open to undergraduate and graduate students, professors, non-profit professionals, pastors, seminarians, entrepreneurs, business people, and anyone interested in deepening their understanding of the integration of sound economics, rigorous philosophy, and the Judeo-Christian faith.

4. New attendees at Acton U are required to take the four foundational lectures, courses that offer participants a framework and context rooted in Judeo-Christian anthropology. The courses are: Christian Anthropology, Christian Vision of Government, Economic Way of Thinking, and Biblical Foundations of Freedom.

5. Out of all the conferences offered in the U.S. every year, Acton U is by far the one where you will learn the most about freedom and economics and meet the most intriguing people from around the world. It is also the greatest recurring event in the history of Grand Rapids, Michigan. (Note: Point #5 may stretch the meaning of the term “fact.”)

Chuck Colson

Chuck Colson

In honor of the 2016 Wilberforce Weekend, the Colson Center for Christian Worldview sponsored and the Washington Times Advocacy Department prepared a special report on energizing and equipping Christian leadership in the spirit of William Wilberforce.

In the section on honoring the late Chuck Colson and his legacy, the Rev. Robert A. Sirico, co-founder and president of the Acton Institute, discusses the common bond he shared with the evangelical leader:

Here is what I wanted to say in conclusion, and that is that Chuck Colson was no fake ecumenist. Chuck Colson was not interested in the form of ecumenism, where people would politely talk with one another so as to negotiate away the truths of the faith so that we can talk about how we liked one another so much.

Chuck was a man of real faith, a real conviction and a real honesty. He was also a man who is captivated by Jesus Christ, and it is that that drew he and I together, along with people like Cardinal Avery Dulles and Father Richard John Neuhaus, of happy memory. That was his ecumenism. His idea of ecumenism was that as we move closer to Jesus Christ, we look around and find that we have also moved closer to each other.

Read more . . .

GTY_Trump_PopeFrancis_MEM_150923_16x9_992Earlier today Pope Francis, while answering a question about Donald Trump’s views on immigration, said that anyone who wants to build a wall isn’t a Christian. Trump responded by saying, “for a religious leader to question someone’s faith is disgraceful” adding, “If ISIS attacks the Vatican, which is their ultimate trophy, I bet the Pope would wish Donald Trump was president.”

Rev. Robert A. Sirico, president and co-founder of the Acton Institute, will discuss the controversy tonight on the Fox News Channel program, Hannity. Tune in tonight at 10 PM ET to watch the exchange.