Category: Audio

The New Totalitarian TemptationTodd Huizinga, Acton’s Director of International Outreach, joined host John J. Miller of National Review to discuss his new book, The New Totalitarian Temptation, on the Bookmonger Podcast at Ricochet. They discussed the problems afflicting the European Union, the potential Exit of the UK from the EU, and whether or not the United States faces the same problems with unaccountable government that bedevil Europe. You can listen to the podcast here.

If you find the topic interesting, you can join us tomorrow here at the Acton Building for Todd’s Acton Lecture Series address; just head over to our events page to reserve your seat for lunch and a stimulating talk.

After the jump, I’ve reposted Todd’s Radio Free Acton interview on his book.

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The New Totalitarian TemptationActon Institute Director of International Outreach Todd Huizinga joins us on this week’s edition of Radio Free Acton to discuss his new book, The New Totalitarian Temptation: Global Governance and the Crisis of Democracy in Europe. When many of us think of the European Union, we picture an organization of European democracies acting in concert on a variety of issues, and holding a common (albeit troubled) currency. But how democratic is the EU? What philosophy undergirds the European project? Is the EU splintering under the pressure of the Eurozone and migrant crises, or will the pressures currently applied to the EU lead to meaningful reform of the organization?

You can listen to the podcast via the audio player below, and be sure to pick up a copy of Todd’s excellent book.

This afternoon, Acton Institute President Rev. Robert A. Sirico joined host Neal Cavuto on Fox Business Network’s Cavuto Coast to Coast to comment on the strange back-and-forth between Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump and Pope Francis.

After the jump, we’ve posted audio of Rev. Sirico’s appearance this morning on the Chris Salcedo Show on KSEV radio in Houston, Texas to discuss the same issue.

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Blog author: mvandermaas
Wednesday, February 17, 2016
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We’ve had a burst of media activity this week; let’s round up some of Acton’s activity on the airwaves:

Monday, February 15

Todd Huizinga, Acton’s Director of International Outreach, joined the FreedomWorks podcast to discuss his newly released book The New Totalitarian Temptation: Global Governance and the Crisis of Democracy in Europe.

Tuesday, February 16

Kishore Jayabalan, Director of Istituto Acton in Rome, is a native of Flint, Michigan, and recently spent some time in his hometown. WJR Radio in Detroit turned to him for a native’s perspective on the water crisis, and what his thoughts are on the cause of the crisis and the way forward for the city.

Wednesday, February 17

Acton Institute Director of Research Samuel Gregg joined host Rob Schilling on WINA Radio’s The Schilling Show in Charlottesville, Virginia, in order to discuss the economic proposals of Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump. Gregg argues that Trump, far from being a champion of free markets, actually promotes mercantilist policies that will result in more crony capitalism. According to Gregg, voters are right to be angry at the state of politics and the economy in the US, but Trump’s proposed solutions will only make the situation worse.

We’re anticipating more interviews to come this week, and we’ll share them with you here on the PowerBlog. Stay tuned.

MLK_PreachingActon Institute President and Co-founder Rev. Robert A. Sirico took to the airwaves in Detroit this morning with guest host Jason Vines on WJR Radio’s The Frank Beckmann Show to discuss the oft-overlooked fact that Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was first and foremost a Christian pastor – the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

In many current day remembrances of King, his status as a Christian pastor seems to be downplayed or altogether ignored, instead portraying him as more of a generic “civil rights leader” – a more secularized version of the man. Sirico and Vines discuss King’s calling as a pastor, and examine what this secularized version of King says about the status of Christianity as a part of modern American culture.

The full interview is available via the audio player below.

On this edition of Radio Free Acton, we pay tribute to the late Supreme Court Associate Justice Antonin Scalia, and look to the future of religious liberty in the United States with Ryan Anderson of the Heritage Foundation. You can listen via the audio player below.

After the jump: Justice Scalia’s 1997 address to the Acton Institute.

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June 17, 1996

Rev. Robert A. Sirico & Justice Scalia – June 17, 1996

Over the weekend, we were saddened to hear of the passing of Supreme Court Associate Justice Antonin Scalia, a giant of conservative jurisprudence, stalwart champion of originalist interpretation, and as such a true friend of the Constitution.

He was also a friend of the Acton Institute, and we are proud to share the address he delivered on June 17, 1997 at the Acton Institute’s Seventh Anniversary Dinner in Grand Rapids, Michigan. He titled his remarks “On Interpreting the Constitution,” and in them he explained his originalist approach to Constitutional law, and the severe drawbacks that he saw with any alternative method of interpretation. He described himself thusly:

I am one of a small but hardy breed of interpretists left in the world who are called “textualists,” or “originalists”… People ask me, “when did you become a textualist? What caused you to become a textualist?” You know, sort of like “when did you begin eating human beings?” As though it’s some weird thing, you know? I mean, I—when did you begin to become not a textualist? You know, you have a text, you should read the text! …I’m not kidding, I’m always baffled at the amazement of these people – “well, what a novel idea! You’re a textualist!”

I treat the Constitution the way laws, statutes have always been treated – we try to figure out what it meant when it was adopted.

Scalia’s pointed and witty observations reveal a man with a brilliant legal mind coupled with a wonderful sense of humor, and the arguments that he laid out in 1997 are just as relevant today, if not more so. During his address, he expressed a sense of pessimism about the state of the American legal culture and jurisprudence; but if he was a pessimist, he was surely a very jovial pessimist. His wisdom, his wit, and his steady presence on the Supreme Court will be deeply missed. We have remastered the audio of his 1997 remarks, and present them via the audio player below.