Category: Audio

Larry Reed Panorama

FEE President Larry Reed speaks to a full house at the Acton Lecture Series

Defenders of individual liberty and the American Constitutional order have long argued that Progressivism is a corrosive philosophy that undermines individual rights while failing to produce the social good claimed by its promoters. Why do progressive solutions to societal and economic problems so often fail? Perhaps it’s because the progressive philosophy is undergirded by a system of mythology that rivals that of the ancient Greeks.

On this edition of Radio Free Acton, we’re joined by Lawrence Reed, President of the Foundation for Economic Education, for a discussion of his latest book: Excuse Me, Professor: Challenging the Myths of ProgressivismWe’ll examine a few of the myths and observe the results of decades of progressive indoctrination at the university level.

You can listen to the podcast using the audio player below.

Conference Panel for "In Dialogue With Laudato Si'", December 3, 2015

Conference Panel for “In Dialogue With Laudato Si'”, December 3, 2015

Today at the Pontifical University of the Holy Cross in Rome, the Acton Institute has organized a half-day conference called “In Dialogue With Laudato Si’: Can Free Markets Help Us Care For Our Common Home?” in response to Pope Francis’ appeal in Laudato Si’ for “a new dialogue about how we are shaping the future of our planet.” In advance of the conference, Acton Institute President Rev. Robert A. Sirico was a guest on Vatican Radio’s “Vatican Viewpoint” to discuss the nature of free markets, how they can effectively protect the natural environment when allowed to function properly, and how to avoid some of the consumerist pitfalls that have been associated with the market economy in the West.

You can listen to the interview via the audio player below.

On this edition of Radio Free Acton, we talk with Marina Nemat – author, columnist, human rights advocate, and former political prisoner in her native Iran. Born in 1965, Nemat grew up in a country ruled by the Shah – Mohammad Reza Pahlavi – who ruled in a relatively liberal fashion compared to what was to follow after the Islamic Revolution of 1979. Nemat describes her youth and the changes that came after the revolution that led her to her time in the notorious Evin Prison. We also talk about how her experiences can shed light on our response to the problems that plague the world today: Islamic extremism, terrorism, and the Syrian refugee crisis.

You can listen to the podcast via the audio player below.

The recent terrorist attacks in Paris have again brought to the forefront discussions about problems of culture faced by both Europe and the United States. The attacks have complicated western responses to the Syrian refugee crisis, with concerns about the stated intentions of groups like ISIS to smuggle operatives into western nations among the legitimate refugees in order to carry out terror operations. And of course, the questions of the compatibility of Islam with western political and economic values, as well as questions about the will of western nations to defend and uphold those values have returned as well. Acton’s Director of Research Samuel Gregg joined host Al Kresta last Tuesday on Ave Maria Radio’s Kresta in the Afternoon to discuss these important issues; you can listen to the full interview via the audio player below, and be sure to check out Sam’s article “The End of Europe” at Public Discourse.

Kirk_BookThis week on Radio Free Acton, we’re joined by Bradley J. Birzer, the Russell Amos Kirk Chair of American Studies and Professor of History at Hillsdale College, and the author of a new biography of the founding father of the American conservative movement, Russell Kirk. Birzer’s book, Russell Kirk: American Conservative, examines the life and thought of Kirk, the means he used to build a conservative Christian humanist movement, and examines Kirk’s influence on conservative leaders who followed.

We at the Acton Institute are great admirers of Kirk, and were greatly blessed to have him serve as a member of our first advisory board at the time of Acton’s founding. We were also honored to host what would be Kirk’s final lecture before his passing in 1994 as part of our Lord Acton Lecture Series. I’ll post that after the jump, along with another gem from Acton’s archives: Kirk’s introduction of his good friend William F. Buckley, Jr. at Acton’s first anniversary dinner, held in Grand Rapids, Michigan in 1991, which showcased the great man’s sharp wit and fun-loving spirit.

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Jay Nordlinger speaks at the Acton Lecture Series

Jay Nordlinger speaks at the Acton Lecture Series

This week on Radio Free Acton, National Review Senior Editor Jay Nordlinger joins the podcast to talk about his latest book, Children of Monsters: An Inquiry Into the Sons and Daughters of Dictators, a book I enjoyed enough to create the “Radio Free Acton 5 Star Award of Excellence” in order to have an award to bestow upon it.

Nordlinger joined us here at Acton on October 29 to deliver an Acton Lecture Series address on that topic, and had some very nice things to say about our humble institute in his latest column on National Review Online (“The Acton Institute is a point of light, a jewel of Grand Rapids — and of America, and of conservatism”), even going so far as to refer to yours truly as a “wonderful Dutchman.” To this I can only respond: Thanks, Jay – the check is in the mail. And if you’re wondering, that is indeed Dutch hip-hop in the intro.

Regardless, the podcast is available for your enjoyment via the audio player below.

Acton Institute Director of Research Samuel Gregg joins host Drew Mariani on Relevant Radio’s The Drew Mariani Show to discuss the important issue of conscience: what is it, and how should Roman Catholics in particular approach difficult moral issues in their day to day life? You can listen to the interview via the audio player below.