26th Annual Dinner, ‘a pivotal refresher’

Last night, more than 800 men and women attended the Acton Institute 26th Annual Dinner at the J.W. Marriot in downtown Grand Rapids.  The evening was highlighted by the presentation of the 2016 Faith and Freedom Award to the late Justice Antonin G. Continue Reading...

Immigrants: Don’t vote for what you fled!

Many of America’s immigrants fled nations that were ruined by corrupt politicians and failed government policies. So why, asks Gloria Alvarez, “do you support the same policies in the U.S. that caused you to flee your home country?” Alvarez, Project Director at the National Civic Movement of Guatemala, says that what makes the United States different from her home country of Guatemala is the “unique American belief in limited government” that leads to greater individual freedom and personal responsibility. Continue Reading...

Economic freedom and economic harmony

This is a guest post by Philip Booth, Professor of Finance, Public Policy and Ethics, St. Mary’s University, Twickenham; Academic and Research Director, Institute of Economic Affairs. Booth will be speaking in London on Dec. Continue Reading...

Interview: The Christian case for libertarianism

Is it possible to be both a Christian and a libertarian? In a forthcoming book, Called to Freedom: Why You Can Be Christian & Libertarian, six Christian libertarians offer an emphatic, “yes,” exploring key tensions and challenging a range common critiques (whether from conservative Christians or secular libertarians). Continue Reading...

What Christians can learn from Adam Smith’s ‘paradox of value’

In a new video from TED Ed, Akshita Agarwal provides a quick lesson on Adam Smith’s “paradox of value” and the differences between “value in use” and “value in exchange.” For Christians, there’s a crucial lesson here about the best way to meet human needs in the economic order, whether through trade policy, reducing price controls, or any number of other areas.  Continue Reading...

Venezuela’s socialism leads to slavery

Because of high inflation and unemployment, Venezuela has the most miserable economy in the world. The country currently has an inflation rate of 180 percent (which is expected to increase 1,642 percent by next year) and the current unemployment rate is 17 percent, (which is expected to increase to nearly 21 percent next year). Continue Reading...