How to read a supply curve

Note: This is the sixth post in a weekly video series on basic microeconomics. Last week we took a deeper look into the demand curve, examining how to read the demand curve, how demand curves shift, and consumer surplus. Continue Reading...

The moral consequences of economic growth

In 1820, America’s per capita income averaged $1,980, in today’s dollars. But by 2000, it had increased to $43,000. That economic growth has benefited the rich, of course. But it has also transformed the lives of the poor—and prevented many more from becoming or staying poor. Continue Reading...

The co-bots are coming to fast food factories

“We’re going to need to see your birth certificate,” the manager said, making a notation on my employment application, “But you’re hired. Show up a 10 a.m. on Thursday for training.” I was too young and dumb to realize he was calling my bluff. Continue Reading...

The most surprising fact about American poverty

Every year, the U.S. Census comes out with its report on incomes and poverty. And every year the same finding repeatedly surprises me. As economist David Henderson says, the report “always shows that there is mobility between income categories, even in the short run, and that poverty is temporary for most people in America who experience it. Continue Reading...