Category: General

Blog author: jcarter
Friday, November 9, 2012
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Five Temptations for Classical Christian Education
Brian Douglas, First Things

Having taught at a classical Christian school for five years and followed the classical Christian education movement for some years prior, I have come to believe that it is the best approach to K-12 education available today.

Disasters Create Bigger, Not Better, Government
Amity Shlaes, Bloomberg

Whew. That was the general reaction when President Barack Obama told waterlogged New Jersey that “we are here for you.” After all, these days, a president is expected to “be here.”

Three Fallacies of the Social Gospel
Elise Amyx, Institute for Faith, Work & Economics

In the early 20th century, the Social Gospel movement was driven by the belief that the Second Coming of Christ could not happen until humanity rid itself of all social evils by human effort. Followers applied Christian ethics to social justice issues, especially as it related to economic policy.

Elections, Political Parties and an Eternal Hope in a King
T. Kurt Jaros, Values & Capitalism

We just concluded months—or years, actually—of “your party vs. my party” politics. So I wanted to take this moment to remind my fellow YHWH worshippers that although we have temporal party affiliations, there is a certain political affiliation that is eternal: We are monarchists. This is seen both in the Old Testament and the New Testament.

Blog author: jcarter
Thursday, November 8, 2012
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Pope sends Obama telegram with prayers that freedom, justice flourish
Carol Glatz, Catholic News Service

Pope Benedict XVI congratulated U.S. President Barack Obama on his re-election, saying that he prayed the ideals of freedom and justice that guided America’s founders might continue to flourish.

Dorothy Sayers: A Revolution In Work
Art Lindsely, Institute for Faith, Work & Economics

That Christians lacked a biblical perspective on work was all too clear to Sayers.

Henry Hazlitt’s Lessons for a Life of Liberty
Isaac Morehouse, Values & Capitalism

Here are five traits Hazlitt exhibited that all of us who value economic freedom should seek to emulate.

To Cure The Economic Hangover, Make Good Choices
Chuck Grimmett, AFF Doublethink

f we are going to make long-term change in this country, Allison says, we also need a change in our philosophical outlook.

Blog author: jcarter
Wednesday, November 7, 2012
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Now that the presidential race of 2012 has ended it is time—whether we are ready for it or not—for the presidential race of 2016 to begin. Since the next election will not include any incumbents, the question of who has the relevant “experience” to be the chief executive will once again become an issue of primary concern.

What has been missing from previous discussions, however, is a plan for helping future presidential candidates acquire the skill-set needed to be the leader of the free world. That is why I’ve decided to design a preparatory course that would help prepare future candidates for the job, one that would (Acton bias alert) promote a free and virtuous society characterized by individual liberty and sustained by religious principles.

Here’s how it’d work. Candidates for the course would signal their intention to run for the highest office in the land by applying to head of their political party. Once the candidate was accepted, the DNC, RNC, or third party organization, would fully fund the cost of the schooling and pay the “student” a salary equivalent to a second-term Congressional representative. Candidates would be provided with full health and dental benefits as well two weeks vacation per year.

The 105-week curriculum would begin the week before Inauguration Day and end just in time for the student to organize their campaign for the coming primary season.

The course would include the following eight sections:

(more…)

Blog author: jcarter
Wednesday, November 7, 2012
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Christians, Let’s Honor the President
Russell D. Moore

We are going to disagree with the President on some (important) things; there will be other areas where we can work with the President. But whether in agreement or disagreement, we can honor. Honor doesn’t mean blanket endorsement.

3 Things the Church Can Learn from Election 2012
Trevin Wax, Kingdom People

There are a number of lessons that evangelicals can learn from failed strategies in the political arena.

A Referendum on ObamaCare and Liberty
Christopher DeMuth, Wall Street Journal

Without an immediate course change, the health-care law will become irreversible.

To Cure The Economic Hangover, Make Good Choices
Chuck Grimmett, AFF Doublethink

If we are going to make long-term change in this country, Allison says, we also need a change in our philosophical outlook.

Blog author: ehilton
Tuesday, November 6, 2012
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I have been duped. I thought, along with my husband, that we were doing a good thing by raising our children in a household that valued traditional marriage and saw our children as gifts from God. I chose, for more than a decade, to work at home raising our children because I could not imagine a more important job during their formative years.

According to Laurie Shrage, I’m quite mistaken.

 Wives who perform unpaid caregiving and place their economic security in the hands of husbands, who may or may not be good breadwinners, often find their options for financial support severely constrained the longer they remain financially dependent. Decades of research on the feminization of poverty show that women who have children, whether married or not, are systematically disadvantaged when competing for good jobs. Marriage is neither a recipe for economic security nor responsible parenting.

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In an essay for Big Questions Online, a site that examines questions of human purpose and ultimate reality, Rev. Robert Sirico considers whether morality is intrinsic to the free market:

Is a hammer intrinsically moral?

Your reply would most immediately be: “It depends on what it was used for. If employed to bash in the heads of people you do not like, the answer is no. If employed to help build a house for a homeless people, your answer might be yes. In either case, the precise answer is to say that the hammer is neither moral nor immoral; it is the person who chooses its use that can be evaluated morally.

Attending to these Big Questions will enable us to more deeply evaluate the economic organization of society. So the real issue here is not a financial one, but an anthropological one: What is man? Who am I? Why am I here? Where did I come from? Where am I going? What are my responsibilities to myself and others? How we answer these kinds of questions will have an enormous impact on every facet of our lives, including how we work and buy and sell, and how we believe such activities should be directed— in other words, on economics.

Read the rest of the article and join in the conversation at Big Questions Online.

Blog author: jcarter
Tuesday, November 6, 2012
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Why Should Christians Care to Vote?
Hugh Whelchel, Institute for Faith, Work & Economics

One way we answer the call to serve our communities is by voting. When we cast our vote, we contribute to the people and policies that will shape our communities and their ability to flourish or wither.

Principles for Voting
R.C. Sproul, Ligonier Ministries

As a Christian you have obligations opposed upon your conscience that in some sense other people don’t have, although they should have. And the first thing is this: You have to understand what a vote is.

Why Politicians Are Encouraged to ‘Flip Flop’
James R. Rogers, The Gospel Coalition

Ideological purity may be emotionally satisfying, but it typically doesn’t win a lot of elections.

Constantine’s Mixed Legacy
Fr. Raymond J. De Souza, National Post

How one views Constantine’s conversion and victory depends very much on how one thinks about Christendom.