Category: General

Blog author: jcarter
Thursday, October 18, 2012
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NHS Age Discrimination A Warning About Obamacare
Wesley J. Smith, Human Exceptionalism

The United Kingdom’s National Health Service rations care and, evidence shows, discriminates against the elderly. Now, the Royal College of Surgeons finds that elderly patients are being denied life-saving surgery based on age rather than fitness.

5 Myths About Voting
Ericka Anderson, The Foundry

If you think early voting is a healthy trend, just read on, as we explode five myths about voting.

Can Only Priests and Pastors Make An Impact?
Art Lindsley, Institute for Faith, Work & Economics

How many of us feel our work is not “spiritual” enough or doesn’t matter in God’s grand design? Understanding this concept of a priesthood of all believers can help us see how all our vocations bear great importance.

Godly Stewardship versus Environmentalism
E. Calvin Beisner, Economics for Everybody

In the last twenty years, the American evangelical church has jumped on the “green” bandwagon and embraced environmental stewardship as an ethical responsibility. In principle, this is good.

Blog author: jcarter
Wednesday, October 17, 2012
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The Church and Social Programs
James Kalb, Catholic Word Report

Christians in the US are not under hard totalitarianism, but we are in the midst of a struggle for the soul of our country.

Report: ‘Christians Flee Bosnia Amid Discrimination, Islamization’
Stefan J. Bos, BosNewsLife

Christians are massively leaving post-war Bosnia-Herzegovina amid mounting discrimination and Islamization, according to a new report released Friday, October 12.

Free Markets as a Fruit of the Gospel
Joseph Sunde, Remnant Church

In our discussions of the pros and cons of various socio-economic models, Christians have a common tendency to forget what should be our more fundamental aim: spreading the message of salvation through Jesus Christ and living as Christ would have us live.

The Constitution: Model, Resource, or Outlier?
Daniel Dew, The Foundry

The United States Constitution is the oldest written constitution still in use. A little more than 225 years ago, there was a meeting of the greatest political minds that had ever been assembled. Each American colony sent its brightest citizens to revise the failing Articles of Confederation.

“There are rich people everywhere, and yet they do not contribute to the [economic] growth of their own countries.”

If such a statement were made by an activist at an Occupy Wall Street rally, most adults would chuckle and recommend the budding young Marxist take a course in economics. But what do we do when the claim is made by Hillary Clinton at an event hosted by a former U.S. president and in front of an audience of global leaders?

As Secretary of State, Clinton is the U.S.’s top diplomat and a key spokesperson for America’s interest across the globe. What interest is being promoted by such absurd, economically illiterate class warfare rhetoric?

Does Secretary Clinton think we’d be better off without the wealthy? As Gene Veith asks, “if you do believe the rich are such shiftless, lazy freeloaders why should any country want them to stay around?”

Blog author: jcarter
Tuesday, October 16, 2012
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Shut up and play nice: How the Western world is limiting free speech
Jonathan Turley, Washington Post

Free speech is dying in the Western world. While most people still enjoy considerable freedom of expression, this right, once a near-absolute, has become less defined and less dependable for those espousing controversial social, political or religious views.

Muslims protest ‘age of mockery’ as thousands descend on Google HQ
Jennifer O’Mahony, The Telegraph

Thousands of Muslims have pledged a series of protests against Google HQ for a “hateful and offensive” anti-Islam video, saying they now live in an “age of mockery”.

Plaintiffs Against the HHS Mandate Reach More Than 100 Strong
Sarah Torre, The Foundry

The number of plaintiffs that have joined legal challenges to Obamacare’s anti-conscience mandate reached over 100 this week.

America’s Endangered Religious Liberty
Rick Plasterer, Juicy Ecumenism

Same-sex marriage and the Health and Human Services contraceptive/abortifacient mandate are emerging as the greatest threats to domestic religious liberty, according to panelists at a half-day conference on legal protection for liberty of conscience, held by the Becket Fund for Religious Liberty.

Blog author: jcarter
Monday, October 15, 2012
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The Christian Exodus From Egypt
Samuel Tadros, Wall Street Journal

For Copts, a persecuting dictator was preferable to the Islamist mob.

Sell All That You Have
R.C. Sproul, Jr. Ligonier Ministries

Jesus told the rich young fool that he must sell all that he had, give it to the poor, and follow him. Is this true for all who would follow Jesus?

The Entrepreneurial Vocation
Elise Amyx, Institute for Faith, Work & Economics

Everything we do in Christ contributes to the Kingdom he is building, and will bring in full when he returns. That refers to the work of mothers and fathers, the missionaries and pastors, the construction workers and janitors, even the investment bankers and entrepreneurs. Each vocation is seen as equally important and honorable in the eyes of God.

California’s Crony Capitalism Problem
Steven Greenhut, Reason

Gov. Jerry Brown and the redevelopment scam.

There’s more to voting than tallying up the number of yays and nays. Although you’d never guess it by the numbingly perfunctory attitude taken toward voting by most Americans—especially in this late hour—who see it either as the highest duty of a good citizen, or as an inconvenient inevitability.

What makes voting worth it, anyway? Is it the possibility of shaping our nation’s future? The opportunity to express our deepest-held principles? Or is it worth it precisely because not doing it would be a civic or moral failure that we wish to avoid?

A recent conversation at Ethika Politika draws some of these questions together. Responding broadly to my characterization of Alasdair MacIntyre’s now somewhat popular case for non-voting, Acton’s own Dylan Pahman offers a perspective that emphasizes real-life consequences stemming from our attitude toward civic choices. Pahman takes as a philosophical basis for this approach William James’s idea of genuine options, suggesting that voting meets all the criteria, and that to not vote is, strictly speaking, not a real option.

As the defensor MacIntyri, here—at least for the sake of argument—I submit that Pahman’s analysis, while logically consistent, introduces a false assumption about the nature of morals vis-à-vis public life. In other words, I think that favoring a “duty to consider the consequences” need not take precedence over—and certainly needn’t extinguish—one’s “focus upon the personal, moral value of voting.” What are personal morals, after all, if not deeply connected to reality?

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Blog author: jcarter
Friday, October 12, 2012
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School Choice Marches Forward
Jonathan Butcher, EcucationNext

2011 a year of new laws and new lawsuits

Bartholomew I: Witnessing Together To The Message Of Salvation
Vatican Information Service

During the course of this morning’s ceremony in St. Peter’s Square for the opening of the Year of Faith, Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew I pronounced an address, extracts of which are given below.

Baptist Colleges Sue Obama Admin Over HHS-Abortion Mandate
Steven Ertelt, LifeNews.com

Further proving that opposition to the Obama administration’s HHS mandate is not limited to Catholic groups, two Baptist-affiliated colleges filed their own lawsuit today against the HHS mandate that promotes abortion.

Communist China Manages Christian Charity
Jillian Kay Melchior, Doublethink Online

Beijing may be reluctantly warming up to Christianity, if its recent overtures toward religious charities are any indication.