Another Reason We Can’t Afford the Affordable Care Act

In addition to internal logical inconsistencies which raise serious concerns of long term economic sustainability regarding the Affordable Care Act (ACA), recently analyzed by John MacDhubhain, Robert Pear reports in the New York Times over the weekend how confusion over certain ambiguities in the law (ironically over the meaning of the word “affordable”) would end up hurting some of the people it is precisely designed to help: working class families. Continue Reading...

Education and Incentives

I have written on several recent occasions about the role of incentives in education, both for teachers and for students (see here, here, and here). Yesterday, David Burkus, editor of LDRLB, wrote about a recent study by Harvard University economic researchers on the role of incentives in teacher performance. Continue Reading...

PowerLinks – 08.14.12

Jail a new church-state option for bishops? Terry Mattingly “I could see myself going to jail possibly at some point over the next 15 years, if God spares me, if I speak out,” the 61-year-old bishop told STV News. Continue Reading...

PowerLinks – 08.13.12

Obamacare Mandate Harms the Poor: A Case Study of Catholic Charities Melanie Wilcox and Luciana Milano, Heritage Foundation In order to be exempt from fines, Catholic Charities of D.C. would only be able to employ and serve Catholics. Continue Reading...

PowerLinks – 08.10.12

Private Debt Is Crippling the Economy Anthony Randazzo, Reason There won’t be a recovery until credit card and household debt levels come down. For the Love of Country: Why We Should Tax Olympic Medalists Alexis Hamilton, Values & Capitalism While the Olympics have injected much excitement into the dwindling days of our summers, many media outlets have given significant coverage to what some might see as the most unexciting aspect of these international games: taxes. Continue Reading...

Cincinnati’s Promising Teacher Evaluation Method

Last week, I commented on Grand Rapids Public Schools’ new attendance policy and Michigan’s tenure reform bill. To summarize, while applauding GR Public’s new policy as effectively incentivizing students to show up to class and take their studies more seriously, I was skeptical about MI’s new bill which ties teacher evaluations to student performance. Continue Reading...

Why People Prefer Government to Markets

People do not love markets,” says Pascal Boyer of the International Cognition & Culture Institute, “there is a lot of evidence for that.” Sadly, Boyer is right and I suspect he’s right about the cause too: People do not like markets because people seem not to understand much about market economics. Continue Reading...

Ministers With MBAs

Libby A. Nelson at Inside Higher Education reports on the latest trend in clergy training: Dual degrees for seminary students aren’t entirely new. For decades, some seminaries and their nearby or affiliated colleges have graduated students with masters’ degrees in both divinity and social work. Continue Reading...

Hollande’s ‘Idol of Egalité’

French President François Hollande has promised a 75% tax rate on those in his country who earn an annual salary above one million euros ($1.24 million). Not surprisingly, this number has struck fear into the hearts and wallets of quite a few of France’s top earners, including some who are contemplating leaving and taking their jobs with them. Continue Reading...