The overdue good news Juneteenth

Although bad news travels fast, good news often takes the scenic route. That appears to have been especially true during the Civil War. Although Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation became official on the first day of January 1863, word didn’t arrive in Texas until June 19, 1865. Continue Reading...

20 Key quotes from Alexander Solzhenitsyn’s Harvard address

Forty years ago today, Alexander Solzhenitsyn delivered a shocking commencement address at Harvard University. The Nobel-prize winning Russian novelist’s criticism of the West was a stinging rebuke at the end of the “Me Decade.” Although largely forgotten, the speech remains an important, and prophetic, reminder of the sickness that plagues Western culture. Continue Reading...

The (just) price of salt (and cancer drugs)

A recent episode of the very fine podcast EconTalk reminded me of one of the more remarkable episodes during my time here at the Acton Institute involving our internship program. The EconTalk episode is about the price of cancer drugs, and the various factors that go into the often astronomical prices of the latest cancer-fighting drugs. Continue Reading...

Urban revival in the Midwest: What does it mean for freedom?

We’ve long heard about the incessant flow of America’s best and brainiest to the country’s largest urban centers. As such cities continue to rise in population and prominence—from Los Angeles and San Francisco to New York City, Boston, and Washington, D.C.—fears continue to loom about the power of “coastal elites” and the future of America’s “middle.” Those concerns have merit, of course. Continue Reading...

How to be an unapologetic patriot

Today is Patriots’ Day, an annual observance of the anniversary of when the American colonies first took up arms against the British Crown on April 19, 1775. Patriot’s Day has become a forgotten holiday, due in part to the fact we Americans have a peculiar relationship to the term “patriot.” To question someone’s patriotism is considered an insult, while to praise their patriotism is (usually) a compliment. Continue Reading...

Is economics an ideology?

‘Ludwig von Mises’ by Ludwig von Mises Institute CC BY-SA 3.0 Richard H. Spady, research professor of Economics at Johns Hopkins, has recently published a piece at First Things entitled ‘Economics as Ideology’ in which he explores some contemporary trends among economists and their use of economics as a Procrustean bed to reshape society in its own image, A body of thought is “ideological” when it will­fully projects its own first principles on its subject matter and actively seeks, perhaps unconsciously, material changes to bring social realities into conformity with these first principles. Continue Reading...

It’s Friday—but Sunday’s comin’

Good Friday commemorates the crucifixion of Jesus and his death at Calvary, the most significantly tragic event in human history. But as pastor S.M. Lockridge (1913-2000) reminds us in this brief Easter meditation, the darkness of this historical Friday pales in comparison to the light that comes on Sunday morning. Continue Reading...