Make Maximilian Kolbe of Auschwitz ‘the patron saint of entrepreneurs’: Petition

Fr. Maximilian Kolbe is well-known for volunteering to die in place of another prisoner at Auschwitz. However, his history as a pioneering entrepreneur, who used the latest technology and managerial techniques to increase his ministry’s outreach, has inspired a new movement for the pope to name him “the patron saint of entrepreneurs and start-ups.” The fascinating history of how the Polish Franciscan used innovative techniques, employed the latest forms of communications, and oversaw hundreds of workers is the subject of a new essay in Religion & Liberty Transatlantic titled “Maximilian Kolbe, saint of Auschwitz and entrepreneurs?” The author, Marcin Rzegocki, notes how the missionary and martyr led his monthly evangelistic publications from a first-run print of 5,000 copies to a circulation of one million during his too-brief lifetime. Continue Reading...

Government regulations in a fallen world

  The number of federal regulations in the United States broke an all-time record last year. A total of 97,110 pages were added to the Federal Register in 2016. The Competitive Enterprise Institute calculates the compliance costs and economic impacts of federal regulations at $1.89 trillion. Continue Reading...

Do natural disasters justify big government?

When disasters strike – as they have repeatedly across the transatlantic sphere this season – government exercises its most essential function: saving lives. Do these heroic actions validate the ongoing intervention of the federal government into local affairs? Continue Reading...

Christian influence over the common law, remembered at last

Christianity planted the seed that germinated into Western thought for two millennia. Yet the contributions of the faith, and its practitioners, remain unsung, underappreciated, and unheralded in an ever-secularizing west – a fact remedied in part by the book Great Christian Jurists in English History, edited by Hill and Helmholz. Continue Reading...

Sin taxes: The ‘nudge’ that benefits terrorism

Richard Thaler won the Nobel Prize for describe how even small economic incentives can affect behavior. One of those nudges, high “sin taxes,” has helped finance terrorism and organized crime. Sin taxes played some role in his winning the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences this week. Continue Reading...