Category: Poverty

Poverty-Inc-300x300The Poverty, Inc. documentary continues to make waves around the world, including the land down under.  Acton Institute Research Fellow and director of Poverty, Inc. Michael Matheson Miller was featured last week on Radio Adelaide in Adelaide, Austrailia in advance of a showing of the film there. You can listen to the interview via the audio player below.

Acton Institute Research Fellow and Director of Poverty, Inc. Michael Matheson Miller made an appearance on Fox Business Channel last week to discuss how his documentary addresses the issue of celebrity efforts at poverty alleviation, noting that often, such campaigns can do more harm than good. You can watch the interview below.

Poverty, Inc. co-producer Mark R. Weber shares his commitment to discomfort as a necessary function of growth at the Jubilee Professional conference in Pittsburgh, 2016.

Poverty, Inc. is a critically acclaimed documentary that has earned over 50 international film festival honors and the $100,000 Templeton Freedom Award. It has been endorsed across the political spectrum, from Michael Moore to Russ Roberts, playing in over 100 universities including Harvard, MIT, NYU, Cornell, Stanford, Yale, and Northwestern.

Learn more at povertyinc.org and facebook.com/povertyinc.

man-stealing-breadFive year ago, Roman Ostriakov, a homeless Ukrainian living in Italy, attempted to steal cheese and sausages worth $4.50 (€4.07). Before he could leave the supermarket, though, Ostriakov was caught and convicted of theft. He was ordered to pay a fine of $115 (€100) and spend six months in jail.

But Italy’s supreme court has overturned the conviction, writing:

The condition of the defendant and the circumstances in which the merchandise theft took place prove that he took possession of that small amount of food in the face of the immediate and essential need for nourishment, acting therefore in a state of need.

“For the judges, the right to survival has prevailed over the right to property,” says Massimo Gramellini, an editor of the Italian newspaper La Stampa. He adds that in America this would be “blasphemy.”

Gramellini is partially right. While the court was right to show mercy to Ostriakov, they’ve essentially set of precedent for legalized theft. While it may seem compassionate for the judges to allow those in need to have access to other people’s property, the result is likely to lead to greater harm of the poor.
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Kris Mauren, executive director of the Acton Institute, kicks off the second season of the Free Market Series, a television program for American and Canadian audiences produced by The World Show in partnership with the Montreal Economic Institute and broadcast on PBS affiliates. In Episode 1, Mauren takes apart the “fatally flawed poverty industry” and talks about Acton’s Poverty Inc. documentary. Interview notes:

Many people imagine that free markets are synonymous with self-interest and greed, but for Kris Mauren, freedom is a necessary condition of a good society. As he describes in this illuminating interview, when he co-founded the Acton Institute, the errors of rejecting markets were becoming undeniable. With the fall of the Berlin Wall and of real communism, he says, “we could see the results of generations of socialist experimentation, and the results were not good. And people of good will have to be concerned with results, not just philosophy.” (more…)

phillies-cubaThree years ago, Dalier Hinojosa was making the equivalent of $5 to $20 per month playing baseball in the state-run Cuban league. Having now defected from the country, escaping first to Haiti and now to America, Hinojosa will make $514,000 this season, playing for the Phillies.

In a profile at Philly.com, we learn more about the trials of his journey, which involved a high-risk, 12-hour escape at sea, joined by his wife and a smuggler in a small motorboat:

You never think about how you’re going to escape, [Hinojosa] said through an interpreter. You think about when. You cannot think about the risk of imprisonment or, worse, death. You think about the desperation that you never want to feel again.

The transition from communism to capitalism has already made Hinojosa rich, indeed. He originally signed with the Boston Red Sox for a $4 million bonus. (more…)

missions-selfie

As many are beginning to realize, and as the new documentary, Poverty, Inc., details at length, the foreign aid movement has largely failed the global poor, promoting top-down solutions at the expense of bottom-up enterprises and institutions.

This is partly due to errors in economic thinking, but it also comes from a lack of understanding and appreciation for the intangible assets in individual communities, particularly as it relates to the social and the spiritual.

“There has got to be more than just a change in a wallet for significant change to happen,” says Peter Greer in an excerpt from the PovertyCure series. “And I think that is where certainly the church and the faith community has something materially different to offer than just another loan, just another job. When you have the opportunity to touch hearts, to touch meaning, to touch purpose, to touch identity, alongside helping an individual get out of physical poverty, that’s where you see incredible transformation.”

Unfortunately, in our efforts to assist with this sort of ground-level, whole-life transformation, Christians often give way to the same mistakes of detached economic planners. Such risks are detailed at length in PovertyCure, as well as in books such as Toxic Charity, When Helping Hurts, and The Spiritual Danger of Doing Good, each illuminating the temptations and dangers of misaligned charity and activism. (more…)