Category: PowerLinks

Blog author: jcarter
posted by on Tuesday, August 19, 2014

A Business Catechism
Father John Flynn, LC, Zenit

How to reconcile ethical principles with the exigencies of running a business has long been a cause for debate. A new book looks at this from the perspective of the social teaching of the Catholic Church.

“Men were created to employ themselves”: Calvin on Gen. 2.15
Aaron Denlinger, Reformation21

We tend towards one of two extremes in our attitudes towards work–either we make too little of it, or we make too much of it. We make too little of work when we regard it with contempt, when we treat it as an evil–albeit a necessary one since it supplies the financial resources necessary to pursue the things we actually value (relationships, possessions, status, leisure, etc.).

“The Giver” and the Gift That Keeps on Taking
Anthony Sacramone, Intercollegiate Review

“When people have the freedom to choose, they choose wrong. Every single time.” So says the Chief Elder, a firm believer in the Reformed doctrine of total depravity, apparently.

The Curse of Calling and Myth of Creativity
Grady Powell, Fare Forward

The word “calling” has the power to elicit eyerolls and sighs – a cliché of the worst kind. Though it stirs up deep desires to commit to a higher purpose and raises hopes for divine guidance, it also awakens the profound confusion within our culture and the church around personal identity and the meaning of a good life.

Blog author: jcarter
posted by on Monday, August 18, 2014

Four Ways Christians Can Transform Behavior in the Online Marketplace
Andrew Spencer, Institute for Faith, Work, and Economics

As Christians called to be holy in all areas of life, including the marketplace, how do we communicate in a godly manner when the marketplace goes digital?

Who Is Speaking For The Persecuted Christians In Iraq?
Rob Schwarzwalder, The Federalist

All persecution is evil, whether it is of Uighur Muslims in northwestern China or of Yazidi on a barren hilltop in Kurdistan. Yet the U.S. mainstream media seems to be downplaying, if not ignoring, the intense persecution of Christian Iraqis by the self-proclaimed “Islamic State of Iraq and Syria” (ISIS), the pretentious self-appellation of a group of Islamist murderers.

A Better Way Up From Poverty
Paul Ryan, Wall Street Journal

I’ve learned I was wrong to talk about ‘makers and takers.’ We have to do more to unwind the cycle of dependency on government.

Journey to Baby Gammy: How We Justify a Market in Children
Rickard Newman, Public Discourse

Materialism, relativism, and consequentialism are at the heart of the arguments in favor of third-party reproduction.

Blog author: jcarter
posted by on Friday, August 15, 2014

Is the Navy Removing Bibles from Hotel Rooms?
Leslie Ford, The Daily Signal

A new directive from the Navy has raised concerns about the potential removal of Bibles from Navy lodge rooms and guest quarters, according to Fox News. These lodges are hotels located on naval bases for members of the Navy, usually used when they receive new permanent change of station orders.

Vatican Calls on Muslim Leaders to Condemn Crimes Against Iraq Minorities.
Jesus Colina, Aleteia

Using unprecedented language, the Vatican takes a qualitative leap in relations with Islam.

From 30,000 Feet, Pope Francis Reaches Out to Beijing
Calum MacLeod, USA Today

The pontiff’s flight over China and his corresponding telegram to President Xi Jinping carry historic significance.

Homeschooling Basics – 4 Popular Approaches
Philip Meade

There are, of course, more than four and I will be painting in broad strokes here. But for the most part, homeschooling typically follows one of these approaches.

Blog author: jcarter
posted by on Thursday, August 14, 2014

How God Shows Up in a Gig Economy
Bethany Jenkins, The Gospel Coalition

Evan Koons is a writer, producer, actor, creative consultant, and inhabiter—a role that he has fulfilling for more than 34 years. He is one of the main creative voices behind For the Life of the World: Letters to Exiles, in which he also stars.

11 Objections On Giving To The Poor Answered By Jonathan Edwards
Matt Perman, What’s Best Next

One of the best sermons of all time is Jonathan Edwards’s “The Duty of Christian Charity: Explained and Defended.” In it, he argues that helping the poor is one of the highest duties of the Christian.

The Debate over “Common Core”
Russell Shaw, Aleteia

The problem with American education has less to do with what goes on in the classroom than with what goes on in the culture.

Federal court rules abortion pill mandate violates La. College’s religious freedom
Alliance Defending Freedom

Amidst a flurry of activity this month in Alliance Defending Freedom lawsuits against President Obama’s abortion pill mandate, the administration’s record in cases litigated so far stands at 10 losses and only four wins.

Blog author: jcarter
posted by on Wednesday, August 13, 2014

Christian Group Demands to See Secret IRS Deal With Atheists
Kelsey Harkness, The Daily Signal

The Faith and Freedom Coalition today demanded release of a secret legal agreement between the IRS and an atheist group about censoring the content of sermons and other messages heard in houses of worship by challenging their tax-exempt status.

The Pleasures of Prudence: How Over-Regulation Hurts Doctors, Teachers, and All Workers
Rachel Lu, Public Discourse

Workers must have the freedom to develop real expertise and to exercise this rational mastery in pursuit of good ends. Only in the pleasures of prudence can we truly realize those excellences of which human beings are capable.

The US budget deficit continues to shrivel
James Pethokoukis, AEI Ideas

A huge economic story that seems unable to get through the filter.

Recovering The Catholic Doctrine Of Private Property
W. Bradford Littlejohn, The Calvinist International

Put briefly and bluntly, I would say that unless conservatism can exorcise the spectre of its “inviolable individual rights” approach to property, it has little hope of surviving as any kind of cultural bulwark against liberalism.

Blog author: jcarter
posted by on Tuesday, August 12, 2014

The Missing Ingredient in Closing the Achievement Gap
Anna Sutherland, Family Studies

Efforts to improve schools and close the achievement gap will fall short if they don’t enlist the help of families.

What Lincoln Would Say About How To Help The Poor
Brandon Smith, The Federalist

It is this advice from Lincoln that conservatives, and all Americans, should follow in the pursuit to fight poverty. Instead of imposing bureaucratic blockades between citizens and their neighbors, conservatives seek to empower local organizations, churches, and charities to more effectively help their communities.

Here’s How the Faith and Work Message Can Help Close the Unemployment Gap
Anne Bradley, Institute for Faith, Work, and Economics

Jobs that would normally be valued cannot be supported by an economy that is unnecessarily protecting jobs in another industry. When market signals are clouded by preferential policies, jobs that would otherwise be valued are lost, and unemployment rises. What’s the solution for high unemployment numbers such as these?

Christians Feel Abandoned in Spite of Obama’s Action in Iraq
John Burger, Aleteia

Patriarch Sako “disappointed” by limited response from US.

Blog author: jcarter
posted by on Monday, August 11, 2014

How Surrogacy Can Create Victims
Leslie Ford, The Daily Signal

Surrogacy remains a morally fraught issue even as an increasing number of couples—unable to have children naturally—opt to have a surrogate bear their children.

A Good Way to Wreck a Local Economy: Build Casinos
David Frum, The Atlantic

Baltimore is a troubled city, as you know from The Wire. Like many troubled cities, Baltimore has turned to casino gambling as its solution. On August 26, a new Caesar’s casino will open on the site of an old chemical factory, a little more than 2 miles from the famous Inner Harbor and Camden Yards baseball stadium. Yet there’s already reason to expect the casino to disappoint everyone involved: the city looking for tax revenues, the workers hoping for jobs, the investors expecting hefty returns.

Coercive Sterilization: An On-Going Crime Against Humanity
Arina O. Grossu, Aleteia

For eugenic goals and population control, governments continue to coerce the disadvantaged into undergoing temporary and permanent sterilization.

What Kind of Support Should We Expect for Persecuted Christians?
David Curry, Christian Post

At what point will the intentional targeting and cleansing of Christians, especially in the troubled Middle East, be not just a story, but the story, in the media and elite circles of government? This one is easy; it won’t happen. Persecution of Christians will not become a major humanitarian crisis for a couple of key reasons.

Blog author: jcarter
posted by on Friday, August 8, 2014

Islamic State pulls down church crosses in northern Iraq as 200,000 flee
Barney Henderson, The Telegraph

Islamic State, the jihadist group formerly known as Isis, have occupied churches in Iraq, removing crosses and destroying manuscripts, witnesses report, having overrun Kurdish troops forcing 200,000 to flee

How These Religious People Found a Way to Opt Out of Obamacare
Philip Wegmann, The Daily Signal

Samaritan Ministries, and other health sharing groups like it, cater to a small-but-growing group of Americans who have chosen to opt out of the Affordable Care Act. Not only do these organizations ignore the contraception mandate, they also bypass nearly all the hallmark provisions of Obamacare.

Gustav H. Schmidt Describes the Horror of Soviet Persecution of Pentecostals in the 1930s
Darrin Rodgers, IFPHC

Following the Russian Revolution of 1917, the newly-formed Soviet Union launched a campaign to eradicate Christianity within its borders. It relentlessly pursued a policy of militant atheism

A ‘Social’ Approach to Poverty
Alexander Griswold, Juicy Ecumenism

Justice is a matter of rights and obligations. But society is full of suffering and hurting people who have no right to relief they don’t earn themselves, and full of people with no obligation to help total strangers.

Blog author: jcarter
posted by on Thursday, August 7, 2014

Social Justice Includes Defending Religious Liberty
Chelsen Vicari, Juicy Ecumenism

It may be that we are raising a generation of Evangelicals who resent self-sufficiency, upward mobility and success stories. I’m sorry to say these resentments, specifically among Millennials, is due in large part to an over-emphasis and misuse of “social justice” advocacy touted by the Left within our church sermons and Sunday school lessons.

How Government Threatens Religious Charity: Lessons of New York’s ‘Met Council’ Scandal
Howard Husock, Forbes

In other words, the Council—and non-profits all across the country—have great incentive to curry favor with elected officials but no legal means to do so. Thus, we should not be surprised that when an illegal means of doing so comes to light.

Three Reasons Private Property Is Essential for Human Flourishing
Shawn Ritenour, Institute for Faith, Work, and Economics

The right to property is absolutely essential for human flourishing, for it is the social institution necessary for the engines of economic prosperity to function.

‘Right to Farm’ Measure Passes in Missouri
Julie Bosman, New York Times

The proposal, known as Amendment 1, guaranteed the rights of Missouri residents to “engage in farming and ranching practices.” Only North Dakota has a similar constitutional amendment.

Blog author: jcarter
posted by on Wednesday, August 6, 2014

Nuns on the Bus vs. ISIS?
Mark Tooley, Juicy Ecumenism

The liberal Catholic activist group Network, headed by Sister Simone Campbell, famous for “Nuns on the Bus,” is asking supporters to urge President Obama to exercise strong “diplomacy” against the “violence” in northern Iraq.

The Repeating of Christian History
Shannon Holzer, The Imaginative Conservative

Though Christianity is currently legal in the United States, its enemies still use the same tactics as their ancient predecessors did when it was legally banned.

ISIS Is on the Verge of Expelling Northern Iraq’s Religious Minorities
Nina Shea, The Corner

While much attention is being given to the destruction of Nineveh’s ancient monuments, the suffering of the province’s religious minorities at the hands of the jihadists is being given short shrift by both the media and our political leaders. Individual lives and entire civilizations are being destroyed, not in conflict – there hasn’t been much — but through the deliberate convert-or-die policies of the Islamist extremists.

Why Are Fewer People Using Food Stamps?
Katrina Trinko, The Daily Signal

In recent years, the number of food stamp recipients has skyrocketed, growing by about 26.39 million people from 2003 to 2013, according to The Heritage Foundation’s 2014 Index of Culture and Opportunity. In 2013, about 47 million people received food stamps.