Category: PowerLinks

Blog author: jcarter
Friday, August 28, 2015
By

The 14th Amendment, Immigration, and Citizenship
The Claremont Institute

A heated national conversation about birthright citizenship and the 14th Amendment is currently underway, with many politicians, pundits, and scholars on both the Right and Left getting it wrong.

A Key to Increasing Economic Mobility
Ron Haskins, RealClearMarkets

The Council of Economic Advisors (CEA) recently released an important and timely report on occupational licensing. The recommendations of “Occupational Licensing: A Framework for Policymakers,” fit nicely with two growing realizations about jobs in the middle of the skill and wage distribution.

Slaying the Hydra: Can Virtue Heal the American Right?
Rachel Lu, Public Discourse

The modern administrative state and our militant secular culture are like two heads of a single hydra. To destroy the beast, we must deal with the monster in its totality.

Why this #BlackLivesMatter supporter opposes a minimum wage hike in St. Louis
Lydia DePillis, Washington Post

St. Louis Alderman Antonio French thinks the city needs to hang on to the jobs it already has.

Blog author: jcarter
Thursday, August 27, 2015
By

Here’s What the Biblical View of Freedom Means for Your Life
Art Lindsley, Institute for Faith, Work, and Economics

Believers should be the most free to enjoy life and God’s creation, as long as it is within the structure of how God has made us. We are not free from God-ordained obligations, but we are free to live life as God intended it to be lived.

Germany’s “Green” Transition Is Gouging Its Poor
The American Interest

Germany’s vaunted energy transition—its energiewende—has been extraordinarily costly to the German consumer, and those costs aren’t going anywhere.

When Schools Are Forced to Practice Race-Based Discipline
Adrienne Green, The Atlantic

Students of color are expelled and suspended at disproportionate rates. Educators say policies banning “disparate-impact” discipline are not the answer.

26% of employers could face the ‘Cadillac tax’ on health insurance
Carolyn Johnson, Washington Post

The next fight over the Affordable Care Act may center on one of its most powerful provisions to contain health care costs — the “Cadillac tax” on the most generous health insurance plans.

Blog author: jcarter
Wednesday, August 26, 2015
By

Should Christians Lie to End Abortion?
Ray Nothstine, Christian Post

Is it ethical for Christians to deceive with undercover videos to further their goals of exposing the immoral behavior of Planned Parenthood and ending abortion?

Troubling Signs of Minimum Wage Damage in Los Angeles
Adam Ozimek, Dismal Scientist

Disagreement in the literature on minimum wages illustrates that different comparisons or controls can easily give different answers. However, as I’ve been watching the data, one case is becoming too stark to ignore: Los Angeles.

Critics petition Obama to abolish faith-based hiring bias
Adelle M. Banks, Religion News Service

Concerned that faith-based groups can discriminate in hiring while receiving federal funds, a coalition of 130 organizations told President Obama the policy will tarnish his legacy of fair and equal treatment for all Americans.

Media Ignores New Orleans Success Because It’s Good News on Charters
Richard Whitmire, The Seventy Four

Just for a moment, suppose that convincing evidence emerged from an unimpeachable source showing that one city in the U.S. had dramatically improved its schools for poor and minority students – a feat that has eluded nearly every other city in the country. That would be major national news, right? At the very least worthy of a blurb. A tweet?

Blog author: jcarter
Tuesday, August 25, 2015
By

Meeting God as an American
David Paul Deavel, Library of Law and Liberty

“When I meet God,” wrote Richard John Neuhaus (1936-2009), “I expect to meet him as an American. Not most importantly as an American, to be sure, but as someone who tried to take seriously, and tried to get others to take seriously, the story of America within the story of the world.”

Should Military Chaplains Be Forced to Conduct Same-Sex Weddings?
Greg Davis, The Daily Signal

Last month, the United States Army celebrated the 240th anniversary of the Army Chaplain Corps. Amidst the celebrations there was also concern: there seems to be a growing threat to religious liberty for military chaplains.

More troubling signs of minimum wage damage on the West Coast, Part II
Mark J. Perry, AEI Ideas

As predicted by economic theory and supported by much of the empirical evidence, minimum wage increases this year in Los Angeles, Seattle and San Francisco are having their expected effect: fewer jobs for hotel workers in Los Angeles and fewer jobs for restaurant workers in Seattle and San Francisco.

The Good City and the Good Citizen
Berny Belvedere, Front Porch Republic

The well-ordered soul is like the well-ordered city — apart from this organizational excellence, human flourishing, whether individually or communally, is just not possible.

Blog author: jcarter
Monday, August 24, 2015
By

Opposition to Capitalism, Even From a Pope, Hurts the Poor
Michael Rubin, Commentary

While Pope Francis’ upcoming visit to the United States will be seized upon as an opportunity to critique capitalism, it would be far better if it were used to show how opposition to economic freedom does the poor great harm.

What’s Driving the Rapid Growth of Welfare Spending
Paul Winfree, The Daily Signal

The fastest growing category in many state budgets? It’s not education. It’s not infrastructure. It’s welfare spending.

New Study Shows How Free Markets is Breaking India’s Caste System
Opportunity Lives

Free markets have lifted millions of people out of poverty all over the world. Now the power of economic freedom is breaking down the oppressive caste system in India, the world’s most populous democracy.

The Role of Philanthropy in Fostering Work
David Bass, Institute for Faith, Work, and Economics

When we think of charity, helping someone get a job doesn’t immediately come to mind. We’re more likely to hand $20 to a homeless man, provide a holiday meal for a single mom, or donate to a local food pantry. Important as these charitable acts might be, they are geared toward meeting short-term needs. What about the long-term welfare of men and women who are struggling?

Blog author: jcarter
Friday, August 21, 2015
By

American Churches and the Iran Nuclear Deal
Mark Tooley, The Weekly Standard

Most church groups and prominent religious voices speaking to the Iran nuclear deal are supportive. Most notable among them is the U.S. Catholic Conference of Bishops.

Catholic Colleges and Planned Parenthood: New Proof of Collusion
Patrick Reilly and Justin Petrisek , Crisis Magazine

As corporations and governments face increasing pressure to cut ties with scandal-plagued Planned Parenthood, let’s not forget the obvious: Catholic colleges ought to do the same.

Kidnapping and Sex Slavery: Covering ISIS’ Religious Justification for Rape
Erika Allen, New York Times

Rukmini Callimachi has told the stories of those held as prisoners of the Islamic State before. This week, her front-page article detailed the kidnapping, enslaving and ISIS-sanctioned rape of women and girls from the Yazidi religious minority.

Walmart and other US companies are starting to feel the full effect of minimum wage increases
Shelly Banjo, Quarz

Just months after giving raises to half a million US workers, Walmart says its profits have taken a major hit.

Blog author: jcarter
Thursday, August 20, 2015
By

In the US, many expect the pope to discuss the ‘shameful plague’ of trafficking
Tom Tracy, Catholic News Service

Pope Francis has called human trafficking “a crime against humanity” and “an open wound on the body of contemporary society, a scourge upon the body of Christ.”

There’s A New Way To Measure Global Freedom
Daniel Huizinga , Opportunity Lives

Alexis de Tocqueville once wrote, “He who seeks freedom for anything but freedom’s self is made to be a slave.” Tocqueville’s observation about the French Revolution sets the tone for the Human Freedom Index (HFI), a new report that offers a comprehensive measure of freedom around the world with country-by-country comparisons.

How Can We Keep Aid Workers Safe?
Larissa Fast, Political Violence @ a Glance

Today is World Humanitarian Day, a day to remember humanitarian aid workers around the world, particularly those who have lost their lives. The day marks the anniversary of the bombing of the United Nations headquarters in Baghdad, Iraq, which killed 22 and wounded a further 160 people.

What prices does the government like?
Mark J. Perry, AEI Ideas

So according to the government, whether a company’s prices are “too low,” “too high,” or “too close to its competitors’ prices,” those prices could be determined to be both unfair and illegal?

Blog author: jcarter
Wednesday, August 19, 2015
By

Minimum-wage offensive could speed arrival of robot-powered restaurants
Lydia DePillis, Washington Post

About 30 percent of the restaurant industry’s costs come from salaries, so burger-flipping robots — or at least super-fast ovens that expedite the process — become that much more cost-competitive if the current federal minimum wage of $7.25 an hour is doubled.

The Economic Way of Asking Questions
Don Boudreaux, Cafe Hayek

Of all the physical, or non-social, sciences, biology is the science that is most like economics: central to both biology and to economics is the quest to understand the logic of undesigned order, and to interpret observed real-world phenomena in light of that understanding.

Authority, Citizenship, And Public Justice
David T. Koyzis, First Things

North Americans famously esteem freedom but are ambivalent about authority. Authority strikes many of us as too constricting and insufficiently supportive of our desires and aspirations. Yet I believe that authority is key to understanding our humanity and the meaning of our creation in God’s image.

Why erratic schedules are one of the worst parts of low-wage work
Timothy B. Lee, Vox

A recent management trend has made the lives of low-wage workers even more difficult. In an effort to save on labor costs, many employers have made employees’ schedules more erratic and less predictable.

Blog author: jcarter
Tuesday, August 18, 2015
By

Who Really Cares About the Poor?: A Socratic Dialogue
Bryan Caplan, EconLog

Glaucon: Can you believe all these rich jerks who refuse to help the poor? Socrates: I’m puzzled, Glaucon. You’re rich, but I’ve never seen you help the poor.

How to stop forced marriage in Africa, soon to have most of the world’s child brides
Lily Kuo, Quartz

According to UNICEF, sub-Saharan Africa will be home to the highest number of child brides in the world by 2050, surpassing South Asia. In Nigeria, for example, where the country’s rate of child marriage has been falling by 1% a year over the past 30 years, its dramatic population growth will mean that an estimated 50 million women (pdf, p.9) in the region’s largest economy will be married before the age of 18.

Don’t Fall for Back-to-School Tax Holidays
Helaine Olen, Slate

These sort of promotions play to everything from our desire for a bargain to our hatred of taxes, not to mention our unwillingness to let someone else get a deal while we pay more money for an item just a few days later.

Fast moving bad news builds prosperity
Glenn Harlan Reynolds, USA Today

Free markets automatically create and transmit negative information, while socialism hides it.

Blog author: jcarter
Monday, August 17, 2015
By

Havana’s U.S. flag no victory for pope
Nicholas G. Hahn III, USA Today

Francis should deny Castro communion at Mass in the same way Castro denies freedom to the Cuban people.

Air pollution causes nearly one in five deaths in China—and over 4,000 per day
Richard Macauley, Quartz

China has long known it has a problem with air pollution, but a recent study has attributed a startling new death toll to the issue. Berkeley Earth, a nonprofit that studies climate change and related issues, says 1.6 million deaths in China are caused by air pollution every year. That’s well over 4,000 per day, or 17% of all deaths.

Hey Christians, Say Goodbye To Religious Freedom
David Harsanyi, The Federalist

Incredibly, the court acknowledged in its decision that it would have looked at the First Amendment arguments more closely had the gay couple ordered a cake with some explicit messaging that advocated for gay marriage.

Clerk’s Office Defies Order; No Same-sex Marriage Licenses
Claire Galofaro and Adam Beam , Associated Press

A clerk’s office turned away gay couples who sought marriage licenses on Thursday, defying a federal judge’s order that said deeply held Christian beliefs don’t excuse officials from following the law.