Category: PowerLinks

Blog author: jcarter
posted by on Monday, July 21, 2014

How Entrepreneurs Practice Their Faith Through Companies
Chris Horst, OnFaith

When religious practice and corporate policy converge.

What’s Happening To Gordon College Is Just The Beginning
Joy Pullmann, The Federalist

There is far more government bullying ahead for every private school, charity, parachurch organization, and even churches.

The Next Religious Liberty Case
David Skeel, Wall Street Journal

After Hobby Lobby, a Christian college asked for a different kind of exemption. Then came the backlash.

Europe Moves to Outlaw Organ Trafficking Worldwide
Matthew Robertson, Epoch Times

An official European representative body has promulgated a new convention outlawing the trafficking in human organs, calling on all countries to become signatories to it and criminalize the practice and punish offenders.

Blog author: jcarter
posted by on Friday, July 18, 2014

Christian Cake Baker Appeals Government ‘Re-Education’ Order
Bethany Monk, CitizenLink

A Christian cake artist in Colorado filed an appeal Wednesday challenging a government order that says he and his staff must take “re-education” classes. The classes would “educate” employees about a state law that effectively demands that businesses celebrate same-sex ceremonies.

Re-Islamization in Istanbul: Hagia Sophia Next?
Victor Gaetan, National Catholic Register

Turkish press reported the lead organizer said, “It is our duty to convert it back to its original state [sic] to show Islam’s prevalence in this region and carry out the nation’s will.”

Is The War On Drugs Racist?
Jason Riley, The Federalist

The black inmate population reflects black criminality, not a racist criminal justice system.

Religious Freedom vs. LGBT Rights? It’s More Complicated
John D. Inazu, Christianity Today

The legal context for what’s happening at Gordon College, and how Christians can respond despite intense cultural backlash.

Blog author: jcarter
posted by on Thursday, July 17, 2014

Boko Haram Shows No Mercy in Nigeria, Wrecking Churches, Homes, Lives
Robyn Dixon, L.A. Times

When Boko Haram invaded her village last year, the Islamists extremists burned the churches, destroyed Bibles and photographs and forced Hamatu Juwanda to renounce Christianity.

The Progressive Appeal to an Imaginary Calendar
Trevin Wax, The Gospel Coalition

There’s no reason to assume that the position we hold to is right because it’s Tuesday and not Monday. And yet, that’s the kind of ”appeal to the calendar” we often witness in popular progressive circles.

Religion in a Heart-Shaped Box
Owen Strachan, First Things

This personal right—one of Democratic president Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s “four freedoms” and the lodestar of New England’s first settlers fleeing religious persecution—is fast becoming the most contested cultural issue of our day.

Making A Profit: An Unexpected Way to Help Others
Anne Bradley, Institute for Faith, Work, and Economics

Profit is simply a measurement. It is feedback sent to producers in response to a service or product. From it, we can gauge whether or not to continue production of that service or item.

Blog author: jcarter
posted by on Wednesday, July 16, 2014

Seal of Confession Under Attack in Louisiana Court Case
Brian Fraga, Aleteia

Will a priest be forced to testify about what a girl told him in private conversation?

Cardinal O’Malley, Archbishop Lori To Senate: Oppose Bill That Attacks Religious Freedom
USCCB

In a letter sent July 14 to all U.S. Senators, Cardinal Seán O’Malley of Boston and Archbishop William E. Lori of Baltimore stated their “strong opposition to the misnamed ‘Protect Women’s Health From Corporate Interference Act of 2014’ (S. 2578).”

Moralistic Therapeutic Politics
Rod Dreher, The American Conservative

In terms of cultural conservatism, I’ve been a cultural conservative for most of my adult life, but having children really solidified my views on the importance of family and a strong cultural framework within which to raise them.

Fostering Sustainable Economic Development for the Poor
Greg Ayers, Institute for Faith, Work, and Economics

While much progress has been made toward poverty alleviation, many well-intentioned efforts have led Christians to actions that are not only ineffective, but leave the most vulnerable in a worse situation than before. Is there a better answer?

Blog author: jcarter
posted by on Tuesday, July 15, 2014

Senate Passes Special Envoy Bill to Prioritize State Department Engagement on Religious Liberty
Leanna Baumer, FRC Blog

The U.S. Senate took an encouraging step forward in the effort to force the State Department to prioritize the freedom of religion in diplomatic efforts globally. In a unanimous vote, the Senate cleared the Near East and South Central Asia Religious Freedom Act of 2014 (S. 653).

Supreme Court: Government Can’t Make People Into Religious Hypocrites
Travis Weber, The Federalist

The Supreme Court’s Hobby Lobby decision recognized that who people are can’t be separated into separate ‘work’ and ‘faith’ boxes.

Compassion and the Rule of Law
Jonathan S. Tobin, Commentary

The surge of illegal aliens–and in particular unaccompanied minors from Central America–across the border in Texas has started a debate in which more than immigration reform seems to be stake.

The Quiet Movement to Make Government Fail Less Often
David Leonhardt, New York Times

When the federal government is good, it’s very, very good. When it’s bad (or at least deeply inefficient), it’s the norm.

Blog author: jcarter
posted by on Monday, July 14, 2014

Religious Witness and Public Policy
Cecil Bohanon, Indiana Policy Review

As a free-market economist and a rather traditional Christian, I wish churches would stay out of politics. It gives me the willies when anyone tries to wrap their political position as God’s will — and make no mistake, a clerical collar under an activist banner sends that impression.

Why ‘compassionate conservatism’ died
Marvin Olasky, WORLD

Compassionate conservatism became anathema among conservatives because it had no limiting principle and it therefore, within the context of getting liberals to fund the Iraq war, pragmatically accepted and even encouraged budget-busting governmental spending.

States That Adopt This Policy Have Much Better Economies
Stephen Moore, The Daily Signal

In 26 states, workers can be compelled to join a union and pay dues at a union shop whether they wish to or not. Under the 1935 National Labor Relations Act, workers can even be forced to pay union dues for partisan political activities with which they don’t agree.

Sherri Shepherd Decides to Cancel Her Baby Order
Gene Tarne, Aleteia

Rejecting the child before his or her birth to a surrogate mother provokes lots of questions.

Blog author: jcarter
posted by on Friday, July 11, 2014

Filmmaking in Unexpected Places
An interview with Eric Johnson, The Gospel Coalition

Eric Johnson is one of the founding filmmakers at Gorilla, a commercial and entertainment film production company working to embody the values found in stories they tell. They are the creative force behind For the Life of the World, a film series that applies an innovative approach to the intersection of faith and entertainment.

When Christians killed & why Muslim violence continues
David Roach, Baptist Press

How the principle of religious liberty ended executions over doctrine.

How Evangelical Christians Do Money: On Tithing
Interview with Tara Leigh, The Billfold

I like nice things. I like new things. Tithing helps refocus me on things that matter, instead of those fleeting joys that will end up in a yard sale someday. In short, it demonstrates my faith while refocusing my desires around things that deepen my relationship with God.

Sizing Up Black Markets and Red-Light Districts for G.D.P.
Liz Alderman, New York Times

E.U. nations counting sex and drug trades toward GDP.

Blog author: jcarter
posted by on Thursday, July 10, 2014

Justice Sotomayor Misses the Mark: Religious Non-Profits Should Prevail
Vincent Phillip Muñoz, Public Discourse

The contradictory reasoning of Justice Sotomayor’s Wheaton dissent exposes a glaring weakness in the legal argument requiring religious non-profits to comply with HHS’s regulatory scheme.

What is the Point of Business Ethics?
David Cowan, Center for Christian Business Ethics

What is most robust in business organizations is the legalism, the playing by the rules as much as one has to, but it does not translate into a behavioural pattern in organizations. It is much more of an intellectual assent or conformity to legalism. In other words, it is very Old Testament.

If Government Gives Contraception, Government Can Take It Away
Leslie Loftis, The Federalist

To rely on government to mandate contraceptive coverage is to give government the power to control contraception.

These Five Points Will Broaden Your Definition of “Faith and Work”
Art Lindsley, Institute for Faith, Work, and Economics

There is a significant need to recover a biblical theology of work in our time. In the past there has been a failure of the evangelical church to address a theology of work.

Blog author: jcarter
posted by on Wednesday, July 9, 2014

Obama’s Spiritual Advisor Jim Wallis Goes On Race Rant
Alexander Griswold, The Daily Caller

So what does this man, who has the ear of the leader of the free world, actually believe? Well on Sunday, June 29, Wallis gave a speech at Wild Goose Festival, a progressive Christian music festival in Hot Springs, North Carolina, entitled, “Racism is America’s Original Sin.”

Nonprofits’ contraceptive cases next for justices
Associated Press

How much distance from an immoral act is enough? That’s the difficult question behind the next legal dispute over religion, birth control and the health law that is likely to be resolved by the Supreme Court.

The Constitution Isn’t a Liberal Or Conservative Document
David Azerrad, The Daily Signal

The Constitution, after all, is neither a liberal nor a conservative document. It does not prescribe any particular policies. In fact, it allows pretty much any policy to be enacted (though not necessarily at the national level).

European Court Decides Church Autonomy Case
Mark Movsesian, First Things

Russian judge calls clerical celibacy a human rights violation.

Blog author: jcarter
posted by on Tuesday, July 8, 2014

The Right to Be Wrong
Ryan T. Anderson, Public Discourse

The right to religious freedom is for everyone, not just those with the “right” beliefs.

How the South Came to Rise Again: The Civil Rights Act of 1964
John Steele Gordon, The American

Fifty years ago, President Lyndon Johnson signed one of the most significant pieces of legislation in American history.

Coming to U.S. for Baby, and Womb to Carry It
Tamar Lewin, New York Times

In an era of globalization, the market for children crosses national borders; witness the longtime flow of Americans who have gone overseas to adopt babies from South Korea, China, Russia and Guatemala.

Free Contraception v. the Constitution
Jonathan S. Tobin, Commentary

The decision that granted Wheaton College the right to avoid even the appearance of complicity in the use of such drugs provoked a particularly angry response from the court’s three female members.