Category: PowerLinks

Blog author: jcarter
posted by on Tuesday, March 4, 2014

The Conscience of Thomas More and the Little Sisters Of The Poor
Sandra Laguerta, First Things

With the battle raging between the Little Sisters of the Poor and the Federal government on the HHS Mandate, some writers have likened their case to the trial of St. Thomas More as seen in Robert Bolt’s play A Man for All Seasons or Fred Zinnemann’s famous film adaption. Zinnemann’s film and Bolt’s play, however, inaccurately convey Thomas More’s idea of conscience.

What Is the Right to Religious Freedom?
Fr. Dylan Schrader, Homiletic & Pastoral Review

The most fundamental right in the area of religion is that which should be attributed to God, what we owe to God. God is absolutely sovereign.

The Rich Get Married, the Poor Get Poorer
Peter Jon Mitchell and Andrea Mrozek, Public Discourse

The Canadian dialogue on marriage and economic prosperity lags behind the American conversation, but a new report aims to change that.

An Argument to Turn to Jesus Before the Bar
Mark Oppenheimer, New York Times

Americans like to sue. But many evangelicals believe that they should turn first to Jesus, not the bar. “If another member of the church sins against you,” Jesus says, according to the Gospel of Matthew, “go and point out the fault when the two of you are alone.”

Blog author: jcarter
posted by on Monday, March 3, 2014

When Tolerance Turns to Coerced Celebration
Jennifer A. Marshall, The Gospel Coalition

The legal freedom to live and love according to one’s preferences does not imply that government should compel others to celebrate all relationships.

Religious Liberty After Arizona
Ben Domenech, The Federalist

On the importance of trusting markets and people over government.

Moscow’s (religious) reply to Kiev
The Economist

On the face of things, Monday’s decision amounts to an artful move by the powers-that-be in Moscow to bring a semi-independent daughter church back under control. But maybe it’s not quite so simple.

Why Understanding Economics Means Understanding People
Kristie Eshelman, Institute for Faith, Work, and Economics

What comes to your mind when you think of economics? Do you think of charts, graphs, and mathematical models, or general principles of human behavior? Can our understanding of the Bible inform our economic thinking?

Blog author: jcarter
posted by on Friday, February 28, 2014

Quality Education is Not Rocket Science
Anthony Esolen, Crisis Magazine

Every week it seems I receive three or four letters from people who are establishing new schools or reforming old ones. These letters are most encouraging, and all of the writers, without exception, are dedicated to restoring what is called a “classical” education.

What price a religious calling?
David Briggs, Association of Religion Data Archives

Record seminary debt shows need for financial as well as divine guidance.

The Protection of the Church
William Saletan, Slate

Even in the midst of religious war, religious institutions provide the moral strength to contain the violence. Faith in transcendent values counters sectarian hatred.

Ukrainians and Venezuelans Demand What Their Neighbors Have: Economic Freedom
James M. Roberts, The Foundry

The images flashing around the world of courageous freedom fighters in the streets of Kyiv, Caracas, and other cities and towns in Ukraine and Venezuela are compelling. Why are these people risking their lives? For freedom, that’s why.

Blog author: jcarter
posted by on Thursday, February 27, 2014

In San Jose, generous pensions for city workers come at expense of nearly all else
Michael A. Fletcher, Washington Post

In San Jose and across the nation, state and local officials are increasingly confronting a vision of startling injustice: Poor and middle-class taxpayers — who often have no retirement savings — are paying higher taxes so public employees can retire in relative comfort.

How to Fix Our Appalling Tax Code
Dave Camp, Wall Street Journal

There have been so many changes to the tax code over the past decade that it is now 10 times the size of the Bible, but with none of the Good News.

Subsidiarity Calls Us to Live Like Catholics
James Kalb, Crisis Magazine

Subsidiarity is integral to a social doctrine based on natural law rather than technology. That ought to be a feature rather than a bug, but in today’s world it means no one can make sense of it or apply it coherently.

Why Income Inequality Has Little to Do with Poverty
Anne Bradley, Institute for Faith, Work, and Economics

Income inequality can reflect theft and abuse of power, and in those situations, we must stand up and stop it. However, income inequality is a natural part of the human condition, and when a result of well-functioning, voluntary trade protected by a rule of law, it can be the sign of a vibrant society full of opportunities for the rich and the poor.

Blog author: jcarter
posted by on Wednesday, February 26, 2014

Ukraine Names Baptist Pastor as Acting President
Timothy C. Morgan, Christianity Today

After 88 die in protests, Ukrainian evangelicals call nation “to learn to love yesterday’s enemies.”

Some inconvenient facts for income inequality worriers
James Pethokoukis, AEI Ideas

The reform conservative movement seeks to strengthen the middle class, reform the safety net, and increase the rewards for low-income work. At the same, it rejects crony capitalist policies that enable vast wealth through government favor rather than innovation

The Pope’s radical call to the new evangelization
Cardinal Raymond Leo Burke, L’Osservatore Romano

American Cardinal on the message of this Pontificate

UN Commission Finds Severe Human Rights Abuses, Including Religious Persecution, In North Korea
Howard Friedman, Religion Clause

The United Nations Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights announced yesterday the release of the report of a commission of inquiry on human rights abuses in North Korea

Blog author: jcarter
posted by on Tuesday, February 25, 2014

The War on Humans
Wesley Smith, First Things

[B]eginning in the late 1960s, a subversive misanthropy began to gestate within environmentalism. This view does not see the earth and the fullness thereof—in the Biblical turn of phrase—as ours to develop responsibly for human benefit, but instead castigates humans as a “disease” (or “parasites,” “maggots,” “cancer,” take your pick) afflicting the planet, best treated with the antibiotic of radical human depopulation and implacable opposition to economic growth.

Reasonable Hope for Our Secular Age
An interview with Greg Forster, The Gospel Coalition

For Christians in the secularizing West, the days of privilege have ended. And that’s not entirely a bad thing.

Rikers Island Tackles Rearrest Rate With Country’s First Social Impact Bond
Ken Stier, Free Enterprise

What is different is the way the program is being funded — through the country’s first social impact bond. With the innovative financing option, Goldman Sachs’ [Urban Investment Group] is lending the city $9.6 million to fund the program for four years. The bank would only get repaid — plus interest —if the program succeeds in reducing recidivism.

Texas’s Cost-Benefit Guide to Choosing a College
Fawn Johnson, The Atlantic

A new website offers data on tuition, fees, and potential earnings from the state’s public universities.

Blog author: jcarter
posted by on Monday, February 24, 2014

Holding the Ropes
Andrew Walker and Daniel Darling, First Things

How religious liberty helps advance the gospel.

Why We’re Keeping a $1 Million Koch Gift
John Garvey and Andrew Abela, Wall Street Journal

This Catholic university won’t cave to demands made by the liberal social-justice movement.

Religious Freedom Bill Riles Gay Rights Supporters
Bob Christie, Associated Press

The Arizona Legislature gave final approval Thursday evening to legislation that allows business owners asserting their religious beliefs to refuse service to gays.

Ukraine president exits Kiev; protesters take over
Maria Danilova and Yuras Karmanau, Associated Press

Protesters took control of Ukraine’s capital on Saturday, seizing the president’s office as parliament sought to oust him and form a new government.

Blog author: jcarter
posted by on Friday, February 21, 2014


Kiev monastery a sanctuary for the bloodied and bruised

Matt Robinson, Reuters

It was a scene of quiet determination and order, a short walk uphill from the black smoke and violence of Independence Square, crucible of a geopolitical battle between Russia and the West.

Dalai Lama: A ‘Marxist’s’ new respect for capitalism
James Pethokoukis, AEI Ideas

A fascinating bit from the Dalai Lama’s chat at a recent AEI event.

Where Does “Separation of Church and State” Come From and What Does It Really Mean?
Justin Taylor, The Gospel Coalition

It’s not uncommon for advocates of the “high and impregnable wall” misunderstanding of the metaphor to suggest that Jefferson’s own policies were incompatible with his own principles (e.g., endorsement of federal funds to build churches, support of Christian missionaries among the Native Americans, etc.).

Inequality’s Inconvenient Truths
Seth Mandel, Commentary

What they need most, then, is job creation. The Brookings study finds that cities with high inequality are better at producing wealth–and for good reason. The job market in such cities tends more toward growth industries.

Blog author: jcarter
posted by on Thursday, February 20, 2014

The Role of Faith in Public Life
Ed Stetzer, Christianity Today

Examining the intersection of faith and politics: What do pastors think?

Going Global: House Hearing Documents Worldwide Persecution of Christians
Andrew E. Harrod , Juicy Ecumenism

Persecution of Christians is the “premier human rights issue of the early 21st century, as well as the most untold story about global Christianity in our time,” Boston Globe reporter John Allen stated in prepared remarks on February 11, 2014.

When Work Disappears
Ross Douthat , New York Times

I don’t think it’s unfair to suggest that this future, however potentially inevitable, would represent a grim retreat from basic American ideals.

Common Core’s Surprise Critic: Nation’s Largest Teachers Union Calls Standards ‘Completely Botched’
Rob Bluey, The Foundry

The country’s largest teachers union is no longer a cheerleader for Common Core national education standards.

Blog author: jcarter
posted by on Wednesday, February 19, 2014

The Truth About the ‘One Percent’
James Piereson, Wall Street Journal

The typical ‘rich’ person works for a salary. Only 18% are in the financial industry.

Alexander Hamilton: An Unorthodox Conservative Mind
Mark DeForrest, The Imaginative Conservative

The dispute over Hamilton’s place within the conservative tribe is a reflection of the unorthodox nature of Hamilton’s approach to politics and law. Yet, Hamilton’s work was essentially conservative in its nature, even if many within current conservative circles are profoundly uncomfortable with much of Hamilton’s legacy.

Bake Us a Cake, or Else!
Ryan T. Anderson & Leslie Ford, National Review

Marriage laws should not treat religious believers as bigots to be purged from the public square.

What Is Stewardship – Really?
Hugh Whelchel, Institute for Faith, Work, and Economics

Many Christians in the church today view stewardship only as giving money to the church. Even those who understand stewardship as the godly management of their time, talent, and treasure are still missing something. We have lost the idea of “whole-life stewardship” taught in the Scriptures.