Category: PowerLinks

Blog author: jcarter
Wednesday, April 30, 2014
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What Orthodox Christians Can Learn from Pope Francis
Andrew Estocin, The Sounding

Pope Francis … models a form of leadership that is greatly needed in Orthodox Christianity today.

Conservative Sentencing Reform: Politically Savvy, Morally Right
Casey Given, The American Conservative

Mandatory minimums’ attempt to rein in judges’ discretion only shifted the discretion to prosecutors, resulting in no significant decrease of sentencing inequality.

The Left’s Line On School Choice Is A Joke From The 1800s
Andrew Quinn, The Federalist

Handicapping your own kids to provide an unproven benefit to a few other children is neither honorable nor brave. Prioritizing your kin is not a sin to atone for. It is a marker of moral humanity.

Ukraine: Even the Animals Are Suffering from Corruption
Iryna Fedets, The Foundry

Animals at the abandoned presidential residence in Ukraine find themselves in the midst of a corruption scandal.

Blog author: jcarter
Tuesday, April 29, 2014
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Sako: “In 10 years there will only be a few thousand Christians left in Iraq”
AsiaNews.it

The Christian community in Baghdad had 600 thousand faithful, now there are only 400 thousand in the whole country. The Chaldean Patriarch, Sako I: “Christians are those who suffer most from the upsurge in violence across Iraq”.

Don’t Write Off Working Class Dads
Melissa Langsam Braunstein, The Federalist

For the working-class single mothers who would bear the brunt of the professors’ proposal, this is a recipe for continuous stress. They must simultaneously maintain full-time jobs in a precarious economy and raise children without the built-in support system husbands provide.

The Politics of Tolkien
Jake Meador, Mere Orthodoxy

From those examples, I would conclude that Tolkien’s politics are basically the politics one expects of a staunch Catholic who affirms Rome’s teachings on subsidiarity.

Wealth Creation – Worldly or Wise?
Anne Bradley, Institute for Faith, Work, and Economics

What, if anything, should Christians have to do with trade and wealth creation? Is doing business and making money a legitimate way of building God’s kingdom, or is it a worldly thing that we should avoid at all costs?

Blog author: jcarter
Monday, April 28, 2014
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Why Silencing Christians will Continue
Rev. James V. Schall, S.J., Crisis Magazine

The number of subjects we cannot talk about in public discourse are rapidly multiplying. The older notion of “free speech” as a search for the truth through reasonable argument is being replaced.

States Can’t Gamble Their Way To Prosperity
John Kindt, IAV Magazine

This FDLE report concluded in bold print: “FDLE joins a large number of other criminal justice entities in opposition to any form of legalized casino gambling.” In 2006, the substantial crime increases that accompany new gambling facilities was confirmed in a definitive, nationwide 10-year study published by Harvard and MIT.

How We Lost the Craftsman
Jeff Haanen, Faith, Work & Culture

Americans today devalue manual labor with an almost righteous indignation. We can see it in our economy, in our schools, in our entertainment, and even in the church. And it’s causing all sorts of problems.

The New Tent-Makers
Chris Kopka, Leadership Journal

Two young pastors are finding fresh ways to combine pastoral ministry and entrepreneurial ventures.

Blog author: jcarter
Friday, April 25, 2014
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Working with the Vatican against modern slavery
John Kerry, Boston Globe

Today, as the first Catholic secretary of state in 33 years, I find special joy and pride in the way that the United States can partner with the Holy See to help meet some of our greatest global challenges.

Union Leader’s About-Face on School Choice
Michael Rubin, Commentary

“My change of heart boiled down to this: I realized my opposition to opportunity scholarships was based on prioritizing adult interests above those of kids. As a former union leader, I made maintaining union influence and power a greater priority than meeting the educational needs of parents and students.”

Paul Krugman and the Green-Eyed Monster
Robert Tracinski, The Federalist

The argument is: people get paid for unusual skills and accomplishments, and it’s no crime to ask for whatever the market will bear—if you’re somebody like me.

How Parental Involvement Affects Students’ College Success
Gracy Olmstead, The American Conservative

Children with “highly involved fathers” are 98 percent more likely to complete their college education, according to panelists at a Wednesday AEI event.

Blog author: jcarter
Thursday, April 24, 2014
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Christopher Dawson’s Economic Blindness
John Zmirak, Intercollegiate Review

Dawson warns that the bourgeois spirit is a vampire which must be staked straight through its heart, and he summons as alternatives other spirits he finds more wholesome.

How the ACA Could Collapse
Amity Shlaes, National Review

Court cases involving religion have a way of stopping big social legislation.

What’s Actually Good for the Environment May Surprise You
Amy Payne, The Foundry

Thanks to years of empty promises from the Left, politicians in Congress and the White House have installed all sorts of harmful policies that block energy production, jobs, and economic growth.

Mission as Culture Formation
Dale M. Coulter, First Things

The very existence of the calendar reminds Christians that, as Robert Louis Wilken put it, “Christianity is a culture-forming religion.”

Blog author: jcarter
Wednesday, April 23, 2014
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Earth Day, a Humbug? From Resurrection to Recycling
Stephen Turley, The Imaginative Conservative

My student furls her brow; “What on earth does Easter have to do with saving the environment?”

Do Your Duty
Gene Edward Veith, Ligonier Ministries

We have vocations in the family, the workplace, the nation, and the church. That means that we also have duties in each of these estates. Most people still feel some sense of duty in these areas, however vaguely thought through, though the Bible ramps up these duties considerably and charges them with spiritual significance.

Abraham Kuyper Was a Heretic Too
Derek Rishmawy, Reformedish

Persons are not static realities. We have storied identities full of development, regression, and plot turns galore. That’s what we see on display is the story of Kuyper. For all intents and purposes, Kuyper was a heretic. He ended a stalwart defender of the faith.

What’s the Point of Common Grace?
Hugh Whelchel, Institute for Faith, Work, and Economics

For most of us, our jobs and everyday activities bring us in contact with non-believers. We work alongside them day after day. How do we think biblically about this situation?

Blog author: jcarter
Tuesday, April 22, 2014
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How Catholic Social Teaching Can Ruin Your Life
Adam A. J. DeVille , Catholic World Report

Real Christianity, when lived out fully, makes you look like a weirdo, a misfit, and a loser in the eyes of many.

Street Gangs, Poverty And The Left
David Masciotra, The Federalist

Street gangs transform impoverished inner cities into warzones.

Knowledge, religion and the hard work of faith
Cynthia M. Allen, Fort Worth Star-Telegram

As Thomas Aquinas said: “We can’t have full knowledge all at once. We must start by believing; then afterward we may be led on to master the evidence for ourselves.”

If KIPP is so bad, what does that say about poor minority parents?
Stuart Buck, The Buck Stops Here

Education blogger Jim Horn, who doesn’t let accuracy interfere with his eagerness to condemn charter schools, has yet another post decrying KIPP and similar schools for being eugenicist.

Blog author: jcarter
Monday, April 21, 2014
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Religious Freedom and the American Settlement
Luis A. Silva, Public Discourse

Steven Smith’s new book implies that it is still possible—though difficult—to recover what made the U.S. a land of free and flourishing belief.

One Simple Step Toward Making Politics Less Horrifying
Andrew Quinn, The Federalist

Today our government statistical services are failing at some vital missions-and they have generally been falling away from the global forefront for at least a generation. In key fields we see not only stagnation, but even retrogression.

Choose Your Own Education
Todd Krainin, Reason

When it comes to education policy, Sen. Ted Cruz is adamantly pro-choice.

How a basic income in the U.S. could increase global poverty
Megan McArdle, PBS NewsHour

In reality, McArdle argues, the basic income couldn’t replace the existing social welfare system, as some of her fellow conservatives suggest; instead, she says it would end up doubling the federal budget.

Blog author: jcarter
Friday, April 18, 2014
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The Joy of Orthodox Pascha
Wesley J. Smith, First Things

One spring, a few years before I converted to Eastern Orthodoxy, my wife and I vacationed in Greece. On the plane we became friendly with a happy elderly Greek-American gentleman who told us excitedly that he was on a pilgrimage to the Holy Mountain (the monastic polity of Mount Athos) for Pascha.

Easter and ethics: How the resurrection reshapes the Christian life
Phillip Bethancourt, ERLC

What is the relationship between Easter and ethics? How does the crucifixion shape the Christian life? How does the resurrection reorient our moral intuitions?

Ten Welfare-Reform Lessons
Robert Doar, National Review

Make no mistake about it: My fellow city workers and I were bureaucrats. But we were bureaucrats on a mission to bring the principles of the 1996 federal welfare-reform legislation to New York City in a way that would help poor New Yorkers improve their station in life.

The State Of Our Religious Liberty Is Confusing
Peter Lawler, The Federalist

Liberty from government is not just for unencumbered.

Blog author: jcarter
Thursday, April 17, 2014
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3 Things You Should Know About the Paycheck Fairness Act
Romina Boccia, The Foundry

The Senate is set to vote on the so-called Paycheck Fairness Act today. Here are three things you should know about the bill.

Are Christians in America Persecuted?
Kevin DeYoung, The Gospel Coalition

The short answer is “Yes, all the time.” The not as short answer is: “Yes, Christians in America are persecuted, but not as frequently, consistently, or with nearly the intensity that Christians are persecuted in many other parts of the world.”

Christians Must Reject Putin’s Christianity
Ryan Mauro, Juicy Ecumenism

Russian President Vladimir Putin was a KGB officer when the service was promoting an anti-Western, Marxist version of Christianity. He is now, with some success, pitching himself as the man who can save Christianity from the moral vices of the West and Islamic oppression.

Philosophy and Morality in Public Discourse
Robert T. Miller, Public Discourse

If we want to move public discourse in the right direction, we should rely on the many assumptions we share with most of our contemporaries.