Category: PowerLinks

Blog author: jcarter
posted by on Tuesday, October 8, 2013

Five myths about anti-Christian persecution
John L. Allen, Jr., National Catholic Reporter

As a contribution towards erasing that blind spot, let’s debunk five common myths about anti-Christian persecution.

Income inequality, growth go together: Opposing view
Scott Winship, USA Today

Focus on the wealth gap is misplaced. Narrowing it shouldn’t be a priority.

Keep Calm and Read Bastiat
Art Carden, EconLog

Bastiat is just the corrective we need if we’re going to change the first rule of politics.

Biblical Warnings About Government
Art Lindsley, Institute for Faith, Work, and Economics

The historical accounts throughout the Bible confirm that government has often overstepped its bounds, with frightening consequences.

Blog author: jcarter
posted by on Monday, October 7, 2013

The war on Christians
John L. Allen, Jr., The Spectator

The global persecution of Christians is the unreported catastrophe of our time.

Ancient monastery has few visitors amid Sinai unrest, but Bedouin neighbors protect it
William Booth, Washington Post

Thousands of years of tradition say the monastery built here marks the spot where Moses fell down on his knees before a burning bush and talked to God.

California’s New Feudalism Benefits a Few at the Expense of the Multitude
Joel Kotkin,

Like medieval serfs, increasing numbers of Californians are downwardly mobile, and doing worse than their parents: native born Latinos actually have shorter lifespans than their parents, according to one recent report.

Statecraft as Soulcraft: Liberal Democracy and the Christian Citizen
T. Kurt Jaros, Values & Capitalism

Francis J. Beckwith attempts to answer questions that Christians have regarding the role of religious beliefs in the public square.

Blog author: jcarter
posted by on Friday, October 4, 2013

The American Family
Values & Capitalism

Over the past half-century, the structure of the American family has changed remarkably. What exactly has happened? Why did it happen?

Christ-like capitalism? God, mammon and the Church of England
David Baker, Christian Today

Under the leadership of the Archbishop of Canterbury, it looks as though the Church of England is attempting to give capitalism the opportunity to develop a new appearance – even a Christ-like face.

Are Economists Basically Immoral?
Brian Baugus, Institute for Faith, Work, and Economics

While it is safe to conclude that economists, as humans, are no more flawed, sinful, and immoral than anyone else, some have asserted that one must be immoral to be successful in a market economy because such a system encourages greed and other vices.

Higher Education, Social Capital, and the Path to a Better Life
Dylan Pahman, Public Discourse

Higher education is not a guarantee for success. Young people need not only a high quality education and strong economic opportunities, but also the integral social bonds that come from a society that defends freedom of religion and association, as well as healthy marriages.

Blog author: jcarter
posted by on Thursday, October 3, 2013

How Should the Church Help the Poor?
Glenn Sunshine, Institute for Faith, Work, and Economics

What are the responsibilities of the Church to the poor? Has the Church historically been a force for change?

The only thing you need to read about school choice today
Michael McShane, AEI Ideas

This afternoon, the Arizona State Court of Appeals ruled on a constitutional challenge to the state’s innovative K-12 Education Savings Account Program.

Obamacare vs. Samaritan Health-Care Ministry: A Case Study
Jim Epstein , Reason

The new law erodes the power of individuals to make health care cheaper & better.

Some Businesses Balk at Gay Weddings
Nathan Koppel and Ashby Jones, Wall Street Journal

Photographers, Bakers Face Legal Challenges After Rejecting Jobs on Religious Grounds

Blog author: jcarter
posted by on Wednesday, October 2, 2013

The Cultural Revolution on the College Campus—Why it Matters to You
Albert Mohler

Since the cultural revolution culminating in the 1970s, the left has run nearly all of the nation’s most influential, prestigious universities.

Pope calls for less “Vatican-centric,” more socially conscious church
Francis X. Rocca, Catholic News Service

In his latest wide-ranging interview, Pope Francis said that he aimed to make the Catholic Church less “Vatican-centric” and closer to the “people of God,” as well as more socially conscious and open to modern culture.

When Bergoglio Defeated the Liberation Theologians
Sandro Magister, Chiesa Espress

A bishop who was a direct witness of the conflict recalls its unfolding and what was at stake. If Francis was later elected pope, he owes this in part to what happened in 2007 at Aparecida.

Broken Families, Broken Economy
Tyler Castle, Values & Capitalism

Massive changes in U.S. family structure over the last 50 years may be America’s biggest problem—and yet, no one is willing to talk about it.

Blog author: jcarter
posted by on Tuesday, October 1, 2013

Papal Teaching Warns Against Excessive Government
Stephen M. Krason, Crisis Magazine

While Catholic social teaching holds that the securing of the common good is a main task of the state, it nowhere says that this means that legislation or enacting a new public policy or program is the singular way to do this.

Entrepreneurship Isn’t Supposed to Be Easy
Dan Martell, Free Enterprise

“The fact that people think risk is a problem, or a flaw, is the problem,” wrote Pallotta. “Risk is an essential attribute of introducing an innovation to the world. It’s not a flaw.”

The Religious Alternative To Obamacare’s Individual Mandate
NPR

While the federal health law includes an exemption for health sharing ministries, some states have sued to try to keep them out.

How Does the Market Work?
Brian Baugus, Institute for Faith, Work, and Economics

Have you ever called the manager of your grocery store? Ever sent him or her an e-mail? Can you imagine having to do so every time you planned to go shopping, just to make sure the store stocked the goods you needed?

Blog author: jcarter
posted by on Monday, September 30, 2013

In praise of honest work
Karl D. Stephen, Mercatornet

If we believed in the honour of work, employment would take care of itself.

Religious Freedom in 10 Minutes
Eric Teetsel, Manhattan Project

What is religious freedom and why does it matter? The pursuit of answers to ultimate questions is a universal human experience. Who am I? Why am I here? How should I live my life?

Time for conservatives to champion the poor
Andrew Quinn, AEI Ideas

Neither side in Washington has gone to bat for the poor, and it’s time for conservatives to step up to the plate.

Christian Schools and Racial Realities
Hunter Baker, Touchstone

Desegregation and the Rise of Christian Education in the South

Blog author: jcarter
posted by on Friday, September 27, 2013

The Duties of a Free Citizen
Kevin Gutzman, Intercollegiate Review

I here make a radical proposal:  conservatives must speak of religion more often.  When it comes to art broadly considered—encompassing music, architecture, painting, and sculpture—the only way back is upward.

Interpreting Scripture & the U.S. Constitution
Frank W. Hermann, Crisis Magazine

During the twentieth century, it became vogue to interpret the Constitution the way that some readers interpret a poem: in virtual isolation of its broader historical context.

Nairobi Westgate mall terrorist attack is part of Kenya’s sharp rise in religious hostilities
Brian J. Grim, Pew Research Center

The Somalia-based Islamic group al-Shabab has claimed responsibility for the Nairobi shopping mall attack that began Saturday and has left at least 62 dead, saying that the assault is in retaliation for Kenyan military operations in Somalia.

Limited Government and Human Nature
Art Lindsley, Institute for Faith, Work, and Economics

How can a biblical understanding of human nature influence how we think about the size and scope of government?

Blog author: jcarter
posted by on Thursday, September 26, 2013

Nuns Challenge Obamacare’s Contraception Rule
Louise Radnofsky, Washington Wire

A public-interest law firm challenging the federal health law’s requirement that employers cover contraception in workers’ insurance plans has a new plaintiff: nuns.

No, Government Doesn’t Create The Free Market
Adam Milsap, Doublethink Online

One of the misunderstandings propagated by the existence of an expansive government is the idea that only government can accomplish the tasks it has set for itself.

Reader’s Digest Dropped Wallets in 19 Cities to Find out Which One Was the Most Honest
Megan Willett, Business Insider

Reader’s Digest wanted to know which world city was the most honest, so they “lost” 192 wallets around the world. In each of the 19 cities, they included a name, cellphone number, family photo, coupons, and business cards in the discarded wallet, as well as $50 in whichever currency the country used. They then left 12 wallets around each city near parks, shopping malls, and on sidewalks, and counted how many were returned.

Pope sounds alarm on anti-Christian persecution
John L. Allen, Jr., National Catholic Reporter

Three days after an attack on an Anglican church in Peshawar, Pakistan, left at least 85 people dead, Pope Francis on Wednesday urged Christians to an examination of conscience about their response to such acts of anti-Christian persecution.

Blog author: jcarter
posted by on Wednesday, September 25, 2013

The Real Paradox of Individualism
Brandon McGinley, Fare Forward

In contemporary American political discourse, there are two poles of authority and power: the individual and the state. Their relationship is inverse and antagonistic; as one waxes, the other wanes.

Thomas Aquinas on Helping the Poor
Wesley Coopersmith, Values & Capitalism

Because of the magnitude and specificity of each individual’s needs, the government cannot adequately provide for every one of its citizens. As Christians, we must work to provide for our neighbors in accordance with the command in Scripture to love our neighbor as ourselves.

The HHS Mandate, Hosanna-Tabor, and the Question of Religious Organizations
Brian Murray, Public Discourse

The Supreme Court’s decision in Hosanna-Tabor v. EEOC shows that we need a workable legal framework for self-proclaimed religious organizations to claim protection under the Free Exercise Clause.

Seven Movies You Didn’t Know Were Pro-Enterprise
Elise Amyx, Institute for Faith, Work, and Economics

Here are seven films that—below the surface—embrace a positive message of entrepreneurship and economic freedom that Christians can proudly stand behind.