Category: PowerLinks

Blog author: jcarter
Tuesday, March 24, 2015

Greektown meters to bring change for homeless
Kim North Shine, The Detroit News

Whatever change is deposited into the meters will go to a charity that helps the homeless, including the regular Greektown panhandlers. The cause has special connection for Agee, the artist who was once homeless in Detroit.

How Asia, U.S. Can Help End Human Trafficking
Olivia Enos, The Daily Signal

Of the nearly 21 million victims of human trafficking worldwide, an estimated two-thirds are from Asia. Many factors contribute to the severity of the problem in Asia, but one stands out among the rest: the lack of rule of law.

An ancient technology is helping India’s “water man” save thousands of parched villages
Devjyot Ghoshal, Quartz

On March 20, Singh was awarded the 2015 Stockholm Water Prize, sometimes described as the Nobel prize for water.

The dam of self-restraint bursts for Pakistan’s Christians
Pamela Constable, Washington Post

This working-class neighborhood for generations. But the comity vanished in a matter of hours after a rumor spread that someone at a Christian wedding had torn up a copy of the Koran.

Blog author: jcarter
Monday, March 23, 2015

The Odd Couple Fighting Against Predatory Payday Lending
Sean McElwee, The Atlantic

In South Dakota, a conservative pastor and an openly gay former Obama campaign staffer have teamed up to battle an exploitative industry.

Great Political Ideas are Sustained by Great Religious Ideas
Dale Ahlquist, Crisis Magazine

One persistent fanaticism that prevents unity is the idea that you cannot mix politics and religion. But as a matter of fact, you cannot help mixing them.

What sustainability and religious freedom have in common
Sen. James Lankford, Washington Examiner

Protecting corporate conscience acknowledges that behind a company name, individuals with their own identities, perspectives, freedoms and convictions are making decisions that affect real people — owners, employees, customers and the community.

Fast-Food Ban in L.A. Fails to Curb Obesity
Natalie Shoemaker, Big Think

The RAND Corporation, a non-profit research group, has seen first-hand that eliminating one aspect of the problem does not stop an issue from growing.

Blog author: jcarter
Friday, March 20, 2015

Federal Court Precedent: A Defense of Judge Roy Moore and the Alabama Supreme Court
John C. Eastman, Public Discourse

The US Supreme Court has set a precedent upholding the right of states to define marriage as the union of husband and wife. All federal and state judges—including those in Alabama—are bound by that precedent.

Of Human Dignity
Charles J. Chaput, First Things

The declaration on religious liberty at 50.

Is Capitalism Destroying the Family?

Apparently one of the ideas going around on the left is that if conservatives really cared about marriage, children getting to live in an intact family with both parents and other related issues, they would turn around and support progressive economics.

Isis tries to destroy all traces of Christianity in Mosul by defacing church and replacing crosses with Islamic State flags
Heather Saul, The Independent

Isis militants have attacked a Christian church and cemetery in Iraq, vandalising crosses and defacing religious artefacts in yet another assault on the country’s rich cultural history.

Blog author: jcarter
Thursday, March 19, 2015

Misguided UCLA debate over bias of believers
Adèle Keim, San Francisco Chronicle

“Given that you are a Jewish student and very active in the Jewish community, how do you see yourself being able to maintain an unbiased view?” That sentence, uttered last month by a UCLA undergraduate evaluating a Jewish student-government candidate, has ignited a firestorm.

Why Net Neutrality Regulations Should Concern You
Ed Feulner, The Daily Signal

There’s a reason the words “I’m from the government, and I’m here to help” are a punchline. Government involvement rarely helps. In many instances, in fact, it exacerbates the situation.

Lord of the Permanent Things
Jonathan Witt and Jay W. Richards, Intercollegiate Review

Scholars have spent decades debating the literary and theological significance of his novels. There’s been less careful treatment of Tolkien’s political and economic thought, even though, as Tolkien commentator Joseph Pearce has put it, the longer novel’s “political significance” is “second only to the religious in its importance.”

First they came for the women. Then they came for the Christians. Then they came for the nuns.
Dr. (Sr.) Ananda Amritmahal, Quartz

Shock. Horror. Outrage. Another church burnt, another place of worship desecrated. Another group of Christians attacked.

Blog author: jcarter
Wednesday, March 18, 2015

Christians and College Debt
Samuel James, Patheos

This story poses an important moral dilemma for Christian collegians, many of whom find themselves in exactly the kind of financial straits described above.

Study: Americans are mostly OK with the government’s online snooping
Mike Murphy, Quartz

For the most part, Americans seem to have greeted the revelations about government snooping from former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden with a shrug.

Does the Minimum Wage Hurt the People It’s Trying to Help?
Anne Bradley, Institute for Faith, Work, and Economics

Ultimately, minimum wage laws disrupt the natural market process. They choose winners and losers, and the losers face increasingly restricted choices and higher prices.

NYC’s plan for prayer break in pre-K classes raises concerns
Associated Press

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio’s ambitious plan to expand public pre-kindergarten for all 4 year-olds depends in part on the participation of Jewish, Christian and Muslim schools, under a proposal that would permit religious instruction and prayers during midday breaks.

Blog author: jcarter
Tuesday, March 17, 2015

Why Don’t American Protestants Care That Middle Eastern Christians Are Dying?
Kazimierz Bem, OnFaith

Liberal Protestants are remaining silent, essentially condoning the actions of ISIS.

Read the words of an Orthodox bishop kidnapped in Syria nearly two years ago
The Catholic World Report

On April 22, 2013, both the Greek and Syriac Orthodox archbishops of Aleppo, Boulos Yazigi and Gregorios Yohanna Ibrahim, were kidnapped in Syria near the Turkish border. Their driver, Deacon Fatha’ Allah Kabboud, was killed.

Pope Francis Predicts His Papacy Will Be Brief
Elisabetta Povoledo, New York Times

On the second anniversary of the start of his papacy, Pope Francis announced that the Roman Catholic Church would mark an extraordinary Holy Year in December, though he might not be celebrating many more anniversaries in the future.

Right to Work Is About More Than Politics
Reihan Salam, The Corner

Just as a growing number of states embrace right-to-work laws, as John Fund recently observed, Democrats are placing a heavier emphasis on defending the interests of organized labor, according to Lydia DePillis and Jim Tankersley of the Washington Post.

Blog author: jcarter
Monday, March 16, 2015

Conservatives Band Together on Criminal Reforms
The American Interest

It’s been a good week for conservative criminal justice reform, which increasingly appears to be a unifying issue for the base and the party’s national leadership.

Could Pope Francis Teach Here?
Rod Dreher, The American Conservative

Could Jannuzzi hand out a copy of this 1986 pastoral letter by then-Cardinal Ratzinger, writing in the name of and with the approval of Pope John Paul II, giving direction on the pastoral care of homosexual Catholics? If not, why not? It reflects official Catholic teaching.

Unions Thwarting Attempted Rescue of California Hospital Serving the Poor
Steven Greenhut , Reason

Costly contract provisions from the state attorney general are making it more difficult for a hospital to be sold, and saved.

The Economic Scars of Domestic Abuse
Bourree Lam, The Atlantic

The financial damage done to those in violent relationships can last for years—another reason it’s difficult for victims to just walk away.

Blog author: jcarter
Friday, March 13, 2015

ISIS destroys historical church in Mosul: Iraqi official
Daily Sabah

An Iraqi government official has accused the self-proclaimed Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS) of destroying a historical church in Mosul early on Monday.

Government and Societal Action Critical for Fighting Human Trafficking
Emily Runge, The Daily Signal

“We can change all the laws we want—but until we change the attitudes and respect for human beings, all this work is for nothing,” said Cindy McCain, head of the McCain Institute’s Human Trafficking Advisory Council, at a recent panel discussion at The Heritage Foundation.

Millennials Want Economic Opportunity, Not Redistribution
Emily Weithman, The Federalist

Millennials are sick of being told to sacrifice our dreams and potential advancement for that of other people whom government picks.

Kenya’s Catholic Church to fight hunger by farming its vast land reserves
Fredrick Nzwili, Religion News Service

Drying livestock carcasses and anguished faces of hungry women and children have become a common feature here as droughts increase due to climate change.

Blog author: jcarter
Thursday, March 12, 2015

Meet the 19th Century American Who Warned About Big Government, Religious Liberty Assaults
Robert Moffit, The Daily Signal

2015 marks a milestone in American history. One hundred and fifty years ago, Confederate General Robert E. Lee surrendered to General Ulysses S. Grant and ended the Civil War. Shortly thereafter, Orestes Augustus Brownson (1803-1876), a prominent journalist and philosopher, published “The American Republic,” an erudite defense of the Federal Constitution.

The oil boom in North Dakota now has a serious sex trafficking problem
Jason Gaines, Business Insider

North Dakota has seen an increase in demand for prostitution as more and more people flock to the state’s burgeoning oil region. Most of these oil workers arrested for solicitation are unaware that many of these women are victims of sex trafficking.

Discrimination against Christians ‘ignored’ across Europe – MPs
John Bingham, The Telegraph

Nursery worker challenges sacking over views on sexuality as Council of Europe warns of ‘intolerance’ towards Christian beliefs.

How to Fight for Social Justice Right Where You Are
Elise Amyx, Institute for Faith, Work, and Economics

You don’t have to fly to Africa to fight for social justice. You can do it right now in your office, on your campus, and at home. Just by bringing someone Nutella? Yep.

Blog author: jcarter
Wednesday, March 11, 2015

Regulating people out of jobs
Sean Higgins, Washington Examiner

Single mother Tameka Stigers figured that she could use her skill at braiding hair to support her family. She soon discovered it wasn’t that easy: Missouri required that she get a cosmetology license before she could do it professionally.

The Rich Roots and Spoiled Fruits of Liberal Toleration
Jeremy Neill, Public Discourse

After decades of efforts to be emancipated from religious influences, the toleration of political liberals is still only an impoverished relative of its classical cousin.

There’s a global war for internet freedom. And the U.S. is losing.
James Poulos, The Week

Uually, grand geopolitical scares are a little overblown. The fact is that America’s powerful economic, cultural, and political advantages have proven to be more than enough to prevent darkness from sweeping over the globe. Until, maybe, now.

Mama Maggie Gobran Serves Children in Egypt’s Slums
Merrit Kennedy , AP

The Coptic Christian, who focuses on education for Egypt’s trash collectors, has drawn comparisons to Mother Theresa.