Category: PowerLinks

Blog author: jcarter
posted by on Friday, September 27, 2013

The Duties of a Free Citizen
Kevin Gutzman, Intercollegiate Review

I here make a radical proposal:  conservatives must speak of religion more often.  When it comes to art broadly considered—encompassing music, architecture, painting, and sculpture—the only way back is upward.

Interpreting Scripture & the U.S. Constitution
Frank W. Hermann, Crisis Magazine

During the twentieth century, it became vogue to interpret the Constitution the way that some readers interpret a poem: in virtual isolation of its broader historical context.

Nairobi Westgate mall terrorist attack is part of Kenya’s sharp rise in religious hostilities
Brian J. Grim, Pew Research Center

The Somalia-based Islamic group al-Shabab has claimed responsibility for the Nairobi shopping mall attack that began Saturday and has left at least 62 dead, saying that the assault is in retaliation for Kenyan military operations in Somalia.

Limited Government and Human Nature
Art Lindsley, Institute for Faith, Work, and Economics

How can a biblical understanding of human nature influence how we think about the size and scope of government?

Blog author: jcarter
posted by on Thursday, September 26, 2013

Nuns Challenge Obamacare’s Contraception Rule
Louise Radnofsky, Washington Wire

A public-interest law firm challenging the federal health law’s requirement that employers cover contraception in workers’ insurance plans has a new plaintiff: nuns.

No, Government Doesn’t Create The Free Market
Adam Milsap, Doublethink Online

One of the misunderstandings propagated by the existence of an expansive government is the idea that only government can accomplish the tasks it has set for itself.

Reader’s Digest Dropped Wallets in 19 Cities to Find out Which One Was the Most Honest
Megan Willett, Business Insider

Reader’s Digest wanted to know which world city was the most honest, so they “lost” 192 wallets around the world. In each of the 19 cities, they included a name, cellphone number, family photo, coupons, and business cards in the discarded wallet, as well as $50 in whichever currency the country used. They then left 12 wallets around each city near parks, shopping malls, and on sidewalks, and counted how many were returned.

Pope sounds alarm on anti-Christian persecution
John L. Allen, Jr., National Catholic Reporter

Three days after an attack on an Anglican church in Peshawar, Pakistan, left at least 85 people dead, Pope Francis on Wednesday urged Christians to an examination of conscience about their response to such acts of anti-Christian persecution.

Blog author: jcarter
posted by on Wednesday, September 25, 2013

The Real Paradox of Individualism
Brandon McGinley, Fare Forward

In contemporary American political discourse, there are two poles of authority and power: the individual and the state. Their relationship is inverse and antagonistic; as one waxes, the other wanes.

Thomas Aquinas on Helping the Poor
Wesley Coopersmith, Values & Capitalism

Because of the magnitude and specificity of each individual’s needs, the government cannot adequately provide for every one of its citizens. As Christians, we must work to provide for our neighbors in accordance with the command in Scripture to love our neighbor as ourselves.

The HHS Mandate, Hosanna-Tabor, and the Question of Religious Organizations
Brian Murray, Public Discourse

The Supreme Court’s decision in Hosanna-Tabor v. EEOC shows that we need a workable legal framework for self-proclaimed religious organizations to claim protection under the Free Exercise Clause.

Seven Movies You Didn’t Know Were Pro-Enterprise
Elise Amyx, Institute for Faith, Work, and Economics

Here are seven films that—below the surface—embrace a positive message of entrepreneurship and economic freedom that Christians can proudly stand behind.

Blog author: jcarter
posted by on Tuesday, September 24, 2013

The silence of our friends – the extinction of Christianity in the Middle East
Ed West, The Spectator

The last month and a half has seen perhaps the worst anti-Christian violence in Egypt in seven centuries, with dozens of churches torched. Yet the western media has mainly focussed on army assaults on the Muslim Brotherhood, and no major political figure has said anything about the sectarian attacks.

The Perils of Liberal Moralism: On Syria and Thomas More
Carson Holloway, Public Discourse

Our president’s assumption that he should punish Syria for a moral, but not legal, transgression undermines international law.

U.S. House OKs religious liberty envoy
Tom Strode, Baptist Press

The U.S. House of Representatives has overwhelmingly approved a bill requiring appointment of a special envoy for the promotion of religious liberty in such countries as Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Pakistan and Syria.

What Does It Mean to Help the Poor?
Glenn Sunshine, Institute for Faith, Work, and Economics

What responsibilities does the state have to the poor? There are several biblical and historical underpinnings that can help us answer this question.

Blog author: jcarter
posted by on Monday, September 23, 2013

Why Your iPhone Upgrade Is Good for the Poor
Daniel Fletcher, Wall Street Journal

The enormous capabilities of smartphones are being repurposed and redirected for use in the developing world.

Gay Marriage Collides With Religious Liberty
Mollie Ziegler Hemingway, Wall Street Journal

Owners of small businesses are finding that honoring their faith can get them in trouble.

Entrepreneurs Feel Closer to God Than the Rest of Us Do
Alison Beard, Harvard Business Review

Do people who launch companies really feel a deeper connection to their deity than non-entrepreneurs?

Thomas Aquinas on Private Property
Wesley Coopersmith, Values & Capitalism

What, if any, role does government play in defining, bestowing and taking private property? This question underlies many modern-day political debates, but it’s actually an issue scholars have debated for centuries.

Blog author: jcarter
posted by on Friday, September 20, 2013

A Big Heart Open to God
Antonio Spadaro, S.J., America

The exclusive interview with Pope Francis

What Has Happened to the Incomes of the Middle Class and Poor?
Scott Winshi, e21

New income figures released by the Census Bureau today will inspire a wave of commentary about the sluggishness of the recovery and the decline in living standards that started with the recession.

Obamacare Anti-Conscience Mandate Loses in Another Court: Another Win for Free Exercise
Elizabeth Slattery, The Foundry

Yet another district court halted the Obama Administration from forcing its anti-conscience mandate to provide coverage for abortifacients and contraceptives on unwilling employers.

For the Least of These: A Biblical Answer to Poverty
Anne Bradley, Institute for Faith, Work, and Economics

Economics can serve as a tool to show us how to better steward the earth’s scarce resources, relieve poverty, and bring about flourishing. The best long-term solution to poverty is providing opportunities through markets to provide for themselves and serve others.

Blog author: jcarter
posted by on Thursday, September 19, 2013

Russia’s Orthodox Awakening
Nadieszda Kizenko, Foreign Affairs

The fraying of Russia’s church-state alliance.

The Coptic Church in peril: The Islamization of Egypt and the end of Egyptian Christianity
Samuel Tadros, ABC Religion and Ethics

While the Egyptian regime maintained its verbal commitment to Nasser’s socialist policies, the reality was a state bureaucracy and services network that had lost all ability to deliver due to population growth.

Work and Dignity: A Conversation between Mike Rose and Matthew Crawford
Hedgehog Review

If we’re talking about taking care of the elderly, and maybe also taking care of kids, let’s think about who it is who actually does that kind of work. In a lot of the country, we’re talking about people who are pretty marginal in terms of their security within the society. They tend to be poor.

Economic Malady, Church Opportunity
Michael Jahr, The Gospel Coalition

A majority of Americans can’t find full-time work. And more than two-thirds of those who are employed full time hate their jobs or consider themselves disengaged from their duties. These are startling numbers, but they represent an opportunity—and an obligation—for the church.

Blog author: jcarter
posted by on Wednesday, September 18, 2013

Work Is a Glorious Thing
John Piper, Desiring God

Work is a glorious thing. And if you stop and think about it, the most enjoyable kinds of leisure are a kind of work.

EU Biofuels Boondoggle Raising Global Food Prices
Walter Russell Mead, The American Interest

Getting rid of biofuel programs would cut Europe’s food costs in half by 2020, and lower global food prices by 15 percent.

What the Bible Says About Government
Art Lindsley, Institute for Faith, Work, and Economics

What does the Bible say? Some argue that the Bible teaches limited government. Others maintain that the Bible teaches Marxism or socialism, or at least is consistent with big government of some sort. The Bible doesn’t give us an easy, one-verse answer, but it does provide us with some guidelines.

Can Evangelical Chaplains Serve God and Country?—The Crisis Arrives
Albert Mohler

Can chaplains committed to historic biblical Christianity serve in the United States military?

Blog author: jcarter
posted by on Tuesday, September 17, 2013

God and the Minimum Wage
Maxford Nelsen, The American Spectator

Labor secretary Tom Perez has assumed the role of God’s intermediary.

Why Christians have much to fear in Syria
Harold Jantz, Winnipeg Free Press

Christian communities in the Middle East find themselves in a very difficult situation these days. For one, the Christian population generally has declined dramatically since the beginning of the 20th century. Then about 25 per cent of the population of the Middle East was Christian, today it is closer to five per cent.

Let Us Now Praise Public Morality
Jonathan S. Tobin, Commentary

The idea that public figures should be held to a standard of moral conduct is widely ridiculed by most of the chattering classes these days.

The Wake of Joblessness
Chris Horst, Values & Capitalism

Coach Kibomango fights with just one eye. He lost his other eye in a bomb explosion in his hometown of Goma, Congo. Kibomango grew up fighting as a child soldier, but today he is one of Congo’s top boxers.

Blog author: jcarter
posted by on Monday, September 16, 2013

Protecting Religious Diversity, Even at the Mall
Mark Rienzi, The Becket Fund for Religious Liberty

The federal government has lately been arguing that religious freedom is incompatible with making money, at least in the HHS Mandate context. On that view, one would expect a shopping mall to be a black hole for religious liberty.

Should Syria’s Christians Be Our Top Priority?
Kevin P. Emmert, Christianity Today

Assad’s forces have killed tens of thousands and have allegedly used chemical weapons. Toppling him could wipe out the country’s Christians. Is it worth it?

Vocation? What’s that?
Paul Grimmond, The Briefing

The heart of the problem lies in the constant connection between vocation and career.

Why Do People in the Poorest States Give the Most to Charity?
David Wilezol, Values & Capitalism

So why do residents of the poorest states give the most money? At first glance, it doesn’t make sense. Don’t the poorest citizens need to most tightly cling to their wealth?