Category: PowerLinks

Blog author: jcarter
Friday, February 5, 2016
By

Capitalism Promotes Equality
Barry Brownstein, The Freeman

In 1900, Americans spent approximately 50 percent of their household income on food and clothing; today, we spend closer to 20 percent. Today, fresh produce from all over the world, not even available to a king a century ago, awaits common consumers when they enter the supermarket.

The $20-billion hole in Africa’s largest economy
The Economist

Most Nigerians live in poverty. Millions would be spared if officials stopped pilfering from the public purse.

Pope’s opening to China skips over religious freedom
John L. Allen Jr., Crux

On Tuesday, an exclusive interview with Pope Francis about China was published by the Asia Times, in which the pope urges the world not to fear growing Chinese power. It’s likely to be hailed as a great opening, as well as another sign of keen Vatican interest in moving ever closer to normalized diplomatic relations with Beijing.

Federal healthcare spending tops Social Security for the first time
Sarah Ferris, The Hill

Spending on federal healthcare programs outpaced spending on Social Security for the first time in 2015, according to an expansive report from the congressional budget scorekeeper released Monday.

Blog author: jcarter
Thursday, February 4, 2016
By

How GMOs Could Help Biodiversity
The American Interest

By modifying the genes of plants, scientists have discovered ways to make food crops more resilient to drought and pestilence, and to increase crop yields, to boot.

Koch brothers’ new group will take on poverty, educational quality
Fredreka Schouten, USA Today

The political and policy empire controlled by billionaire industrialist Charles Koch is building a non-profit wing its leaders say will work to address deep-seated social ills and “revitalize civil society.” Its initial efforts will focus on poverty and educational quality.

Theft-by-Government Continues Through Eminent Domain
A. Barton Hinkle, Reason.com

Governments ignoring the constitutional limitations to eminent domain.

How Ordinary People Are Giving Glimpses of God’s Restoration
James Clark, Institute for Faith, Work, and Economics

It’s easy to say that ordinary people can effect meaningful change. However, words alone are not proof. Without substantive evidence, any talk of our power to change the world may be nothing more than wishful thinking.

Blog author: jcarter
Wednesday, February 3, 2016
By

How School Choice Could Improve Life for Teachers
Mary Clare Reim, The Daily Signal

While it’s often easy to see the success school choice programs have on students, what’s often missing from this conversation is the acknowledgment that teachers are also empowered by school choice.

Flint Weighs Scope of Harm to Children Caused by Lead in Water
Abby Goodnough, New York Times

As officials try to track how many children in Flint, Mich., have been exposed to lead, underlying troubles prevalent among low-income families add to concerns.

Poll: 7 in 10 voters support school choice
Bonnie Kristian, The Week

A strong majority — 70 percent — of likely voters support school choice, finds a new poll funded by the American Federation for Children, a school choice advocacy group.

Will Sanders and Trump voters push America away from market capitalism?
James Pethokoukis, AEI

Donald Trump says Bernie Sanders is a probable “communist” and “total whack job.” Sanders calls Trump a “pathological liar,” his policy ideas “pathetic.” Trump would cut taxes by $12 trillion over the next decade, and Sanders would raise them by $14 trillion. Also big differences on issues such as climate change and immigration.

Blog author: jcarter
Tuesday, February 2, 2016
By

Political Action and the Primacy of the Good
Daniel J. Mahoney, City Journal

The theological-political reflection of Pierre Manent.

The Rise Of The ‘God Gap’
Anne Pluta, FiveThirtyEight

The best predictor of vote choice, according to work by political scientists Robert Putnam of Harvard and David Campbell of Notre Dame, is religiosity, not religious affiliation; Putnam and Campbell call it the “God gap.”

Don’t be fooled: Iowa evangelicals of media fame do not represent the nation’s evangelicals
Collin Hansen, Washington Post

Another four years have passed. We have an extra day in February. We get to watch the Olympics this summer. And “Iowa evangelicals” have returned to the media spotlight.

“We cannot talk about it”: Factory workers for major fashion labels live confined by guards
Marc Bain, Quartz

Up to 80% of garment workers in Bangalore, India, are believed to be migrant workers. Many don’t speak the local language and struggle to find housing, so garment factories fill the gap by offering company accommodations. The only catch: Some residents are treated like prisoners.

Blog author: jcarter
Monday, February 1, 2016
By

How to make free trade really work
Pascal-Emmanuel Gobry, The Week

As a conservative, I’ve always been a huge believer in free trade. I still am, but the truth is that the protectionists have some things right.

How Long Could the U.S. Go Without Electricity?
A. Barton Hinkle, Reason.com

Ted Koppel’s latest book explores the effects of EMP weapons.

Do Americans Believe Hard Work Still Matters?
Lauren Cassani Davis, The Atlantic

Yes, but they’re more skeptical about whether going to college helps them achieve their goals.

Can America’s Religious Traditions Strengthen Marriage?
Amber Lapp, Family Studies

If religious groups want to support marriage, they must find ways to reach out to those who now feel unwelcome.

Blog author: jcarter
Friday, January 29, 2016
By

Why Bernie Sanders doesn’t participate in organized religion
Frances Stead Sellers and John Wagner, Washington Post

“I think everyone believes in God in their own ways,” he said. “To me, it means that all of us are connected, all of life is connected, and that we are all tied together.”

How to Make Liberal Democracy Safe for Religion
Terence Sweeney, First Things

Contemporary liberal philosophy is unable to respond to theological challenges because it cannot account for religious people who are actually religious.

Economic Lessons from ‘Star Wars’ Planet Jakku
Kurt Jaros, Values and Capitalism

In “Star Wars: The Force Awakens”—which at this point I’m sure most of us have seen—we are exposed to some fundamental principles of economics. In this post I would like to examine three principles: supply and demand, economic relativity, and the destruction of value

Why This Local Pharmacist’s Religious Liberty Case Could Go to Supreme Court
Elizabeth Slattery , The Daily Signal

Can a state force pharmacists to prescribe abortion-inducing drugs at the expense of their religious beliefs? This is the central issue in a case the Supreme Court may agree to hear in its next term.

Blog author: jcarter
Thursday, January 28, 2016
By

Property rights, not eminent domain, first function of good government
Ray Nothstine, Jones & Blount

Like all inherent rights, the right to private property tends to erode with the growth of government. While the American framers did not agree on everything, they were universal in their agreement that personal freedom and property rights were inseparable.

The Impossible (Pipe) Dream—Single-Payer Health Reform
Henry J. Aaron, Inside Sources

Single-payer health reform is a dream because, as the old joke goes, ‘you can’t get there from here.’

Marriage, Poverty and the Political Divide
Andrew L. Yarrow, New York Times

There remains some argument among lawmakers over which Americans should be able to marry, but nearly everyone agrees that marriage itself offers stability and economic benefits to couples and to society at large.

Shared housing as a poverty solution
Kevin C. Corinth, AEI

We often think there are only two ways to fight poverty — the government and private philanthropy. But living arrangements can be just as important