Category: PowerLinks

Blog author: jcarter
Monday, October 12, 2015
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India is as rich as the US in 1881. A mesmerizing graphic shows where every country falls.
Dylan Matthews and Kavya Sukumar, Vox

As of 2013, India had a GDP per capita of $5,200, as measured in 2005 dollars. For comparison, the US had a GDP per capita (again, measured in 2005 dollars) of $5,200 in 1881.

Replace Welfare With a Negative Income Tax
Michael Shindler, Manhattan Institute

Amid years of perpetual congressional gridlock and partisan rivalry, the notion that both Republicans and Democrats could come together in support of sweeping welfare reform seems laughable. Yet, if it were to happen, the likeliest candidate for such a reformative policy might be the negative income tax (NIT).

The Case for Choice in Education
Veronique De Rugy, The Corner

The answer is and always has been that throwing money at the problem of failing schools, especially when the money will be spent on teachers’ salary and consultants, does nothing to address the structural problems and disincentives to perform that exist in these schools.

Study: Democrats Moving Left Faster Than Republicans Moving Right
The American Interest

At least since the 2010 midterms, it’s been a liberal talking point that Republican extremism is to blame for political polarization and gridlock.

Blog author: jcarter
Friday, October 9, 2015
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What you need to know about the U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom
Matthew Hawkins, ERLC

Authorization for the United States Commission on International Religious Freedom (USCIRF) is about to expire. Below are five basic things you need to know about USCIRF and why it matters

International Religious Freedom Commission Lives to Fight Another Day
Faith McDonnell, Juicy Ecumenism

The United States government’s watchdog for those around the world who are being persecuted because of their religious beliefs will continue its work.

Wilberforce and the Road to Abolition: A Model for Christian Cultural Engagement
Andrew Spencer, Institute for Faith, Work, and Economics

Wilberforce’s greatest achievement was ending slavery in the British Empire. However, his impact spread to other social issues.

Gig Economy Is Piecework. But This Isn’t Dickens.
Megan McArdle, BloombergView

Manual labor in the Victorian era was not primarily awful because it involved short-term contracts; it was awful because the jobs were grim, the pay was low, and injured workers frequently ended up destitute. Getting paid $25 an hour for doing something much more pleasant than scrubbing floors with caustic chemicals does not tug at my heartstrings in the same way.

Blog author: jcarter
Thursday, October 8, 2015
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School choice’s supply problem
Max Eden, AEI Ideas

School choice programs will hit a low ceiling without the creation of new and better schools.

Students Make a Surprising Discovery about Small-Town Poverty Alleviation
Russ McCullough, Institute for Faith, Work, and Economics

12,500 people live in Ottawa, including the 670 students attending Ottawa University, where I teach economics. Poverty is still present in our pleasant little town.

A Princess’s Plan to Bring Light to the 620 Million Africans Without Power
Bryan Lufkin, Gizmodo

Many people living in Africa need electricity, but don’t have it. Luckily, something of a solar power revolution is afoot in Africa, triggering a wave of innovation from solar energy entrepreneurs. One of them is a princess descended from an ancient Mossi warrior, who stresses that the best way to combat this problem is by empowering the people to educate and help themselves.

The Reign of Recycling
John Tierney, New York Times

While it’s true that the recycling message has reached more people than ever, when it comes to the bottom line, both economically and environmentally, not much has changed at all.

Blog author: jcarter
Wednesday, October 7, 2015
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The Crisis In International Religious Freedom
David D. Corey, First Things

The vital question is why the number of countries committing and supporting religious persecution is growing so rapidly. The number of CPSs has nearly doubled in a year. What lies behind this startling trend?

Supreme Court Justices Get More Liberal As They Get Older
Oliver Roeder, FiveThirtyEight

A typical justice nominated by a Republican president starts out at age 50 as an Antonin Scalia and retires at age 80 as an Anthony Kennedy. A justice nominated by a Democrat, however, is a lifelong Stephen Breyer.

African governments show improvements but progress ‘stalls’
BBC

Thirty-three out of Africa’s 54 countries have shown improvements in the way they are governed over the last four years, research has found.

Uber, Millennials And The Struggle For The Free Market
Tom Rogan, Opportunity Lives

Unfortunately, from Frankfurt to Paris, Madrid to Rome, Sao Paulo to San Francisco, London to New York and beyond, ride-sharing firms are under attack from increasingly aggressive enemies.

Blog author: jcarter
Tuesday, October 6, 2015
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Funding growth, expanding opportunity: Novel funding mechanisms for schools of choice
Michael Q. McShane, AEI Ideas

Private school choice programs and the organizations that support them could do a much better job deferring the capital, infrastructure, and other fixed costs of participating private schools.

This is the simplest solution to help Africans live longer
Samuel Oti, Quartz

For many African countries and especially among poorer communities, when people die there is no trace in any official legal record or statistic.

How Do You Improve Worker Pay? Licensing Reforms, Not Unions.
James Sherk and Astrid Gonzalez, The Daily Signal

What do today’s workers need? The White House appears to believe the answer is “a union.” At a summit Wednesday the administration plans to showcase workers unions have helped. That is fair enough, but most workers don’t find unions relevant to their working lives. A much greater problem is the barriers the government itself erects.

The Military Isn’t A Low-Wage Option For Stupid People
Emily Domenech, The Federalist

Active-duty military troops far out-earn their civilian counterparts when compared to civilians with similar education.

Blog author: jcarter
Monday, October 5, 2015
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What this new experiment in Chicago can teach us about combating poverty
Joel Dodge, The Week

In an age of rising inequality and stagnating incomes, we must look for ways to get smarter about fighting economic insecurity. This means adapting successful anti-poverty interventions to meet the needs of low-income Americans.

Why raising taxes on the rich doesn’t reduce inequality
James Pethokoukis, AEI Ideas

The progressive/left-wing response to the new Brookings study on inequality is obvious, right? From “Would a significant increase in the top income tax rate substantially alter income inequality?”

God’s Purpose in Creation: A Study in Genesis 1
Greg Ayers, Institute for Faith, Work, and Economics

The first chapter of Genesis is more than the introduction to the first book of the Bible. It’s the opening chapter in the grand story of God’s redemptive plan for his creation.

Criminal justice reformers just secured a major victory: a bill that could pass the Senate
Dara Lind, Vox

On Thursday, a group of senators introduced a bill they called “the biggest criminal justice reform in a generation” — an effort that, unlike other bills, actually has a shot at moving through the chamber.

Blog author: jcarter
Friday, October 2, 2015
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It’s sleazy, it’s totally illegal, and yet it could become the future of retirement
Jeff Guo, Washington Post

Over 100 years ago in America — before Social Security, before IRAs, corporate pensions and 401(k)s — there was a ludicrously popular (and somewhat sleazy) retirement scheme called the tontine.

World Bank rethinks poverty measure
Noel King, Marketplace

The United Nations General Assembly meets in New York City this week, and poverty is high on the agenda. Eradicating extreme poverty by the year 2030 is No. 1 on the U.N. list of sustainable development goals. The World Bank, which sets the benchmark for the global extreme poverty line, is expected to shift the line soon from $1.25 a day to $1.90 a day.

Evangelicals Going to the Dogs — and Cats — With Major Statement on Animal Welfare
David Briggs, Huffington Post

First, Pope Francis issued a major encyclical in June stating any act of cruelty toward any creature “is contrary to human dignity.” Now, evangelicals are turning their attention to all creatures great and small.

How important is inequality to voters?
Karlyn Bowman and Heather Sims, AEI Ideas

What are Americans saying about the issue that Mayor de Blasio and the candidates should know? Do people think the deck is stacked against them? Do they believe inequality is getting worse? How important will the issue be in 2016?