Category: PowerLinks

Blog author: jcarter
posted by on Wednesday, August 14, 2013

She Stood for the Quotidian: Jean Bethke Elshtain (1941 – 2013)
Marc LiVecche, The Gospel Coalition

Jean Bethke Elshtain’s true professional measure is taken elsewhere, perhaps, if I might suggest, in this: she worked where life was lived.

Islam Conquering Higher European Education
Soeren Kern, Gatestone Institute

The Catholic University of Leuven, the oldest university in Belgium and one that has been a major contributor to the development of Roman Catholic theology for more than 500 years, will offer a degree in Islamic theology beginning in 2014.

The Root of Evil
William T. Cavanaugh, America

Does religion promote violence?

Putting Virtue into Practice
Hugh Whelchel, Institute for Faith, Work, and Economics

Benjamin Franklin offers one of the most famous examples of striving to live within a code of conduct.

Blog author: jcarter
posted by on Tuesday, August 13, 2013

Social Justice Reconsidered: Report from the Philadelphia Society
Jeremy Mann, Mere Orthodoxy

While the phrase “social justice” has been used since the Jesuit priest Luigi Taparelli coined the term in 1840, Friedrich Hayek never could found a good definition, due to two persistent problems.

‘Disinformation’ and a Dubious Source
Victor Gaetan, National Catholic Register

Lt. Gen. Ion Mihai Pacepa’s story defames a legendary Vatican diplomat and undermines positive Catholic-Russian Orthodox relations.

Swiss asked to ditch God from national anthem
Christian Institute

Switzerland is holding a competition to rewrite its national anthem because it currently focuses on God.

Why Capitalism Is Awesome
Chris Berg, Cato Policy Report

We have higher living standards than our ancestors because of the little things. We ought to be more aware of the continuous, slow, and imperceptible creative destruction of the market economy, the refiners who are always imperceptibly bettering our frozen pizzas, our bookshelves, our pencils, and our crayons.

Blog author: jcarter
posted by on Monday, August 12, 2013

The Isolationist Immigration Gospel of the Evangelical Immigration Table
Bill Blankschaen, Faith Walkers

Although I have great respect for many of the evangelical leaders who signed on to the original letter from the Evangelical Immigration Table, I have a few problems with how the evangelical label is being exploited for political gain.

The State of Economic Freedom in the United States and the World
The American

The developing world is increasingly embracing economic freedom, and reaping the benefits. So why are the United States and the EU heading in the opposite direction?

Families, Flourishing, and Upward Mobility
James K.A. Smith, Cardus

A healthy, flourishing society depends on structures and institutions beyond the state. Even the economic life of a nation cannot be adequately (or justly) fostered by just a couple of “spheres” (as Abraham Kuyper called them) like the market and/or government.

Did Jesus Tell Martha Not to Work?
Joy Buchanan, Institute for Faith, Work, and Economics

Christians are called to work, but if that is making us exhausted and anxious, then we could actually be making work into an idol.

Blog author: jcarter
posted by on Friday, August 9, 2013

Religion and the American Republic
George F. Will, National Affairs

Is it a fact that the success of democracy, meaning self-government, requires a religious demos — religious people governing themselves by religious norms? The other is a question of logic: Does belief in America’s distinctive democracy — a government with clear limits defined by the natural rights of the governed — entail religious belief?

George Will, Unchurched, Defends Religion
G. Tracy Mehan, III, The American Spectator

But how far will rationalism, alone, get us?

A Foreign View of the HHS Mandate
William Newton, Crisis Magazine

Perhaps it is because I am a European living in Europe and, thereby, not so entangled in the HHS mandate issue (and have less to lose) that I cannot understand the thinking that surrounds the response of some Catholics in the US.

Four Lessons about Faith & Work from Brother Lawrence
Andrew Spencer, Institute for Faith, Work, and Economics

What can a seventeenth century laymen teach us in the twenty-first century about faith and work?

Blog author: jcarter
posted by on Thursday, August 8, 2013

Scrooge vs. Röpke: The Limits of Economic Virtue
Gracy Howard, The American Conservative

Dickens and Röpke both seem to suggest that the virtues of dignity and liberty must be tempered and complemented with one more virtue, once called the greatest of them all: love.

Lessons on Conscience Protection from the UK
Paul Diamond, Public Discourse

Unless Americans respond to the Supreme Court’s recent marriage decisions with greater protections for the rights of conscience, our first freedom is sure to lose force, just as it has in the UK.

Does a Free-Market Mindset Harm Marriage?
Joy Pullmann, Values & Capitalism

The Supreme Court’s recent ruling allowing states to grant same-sex couples marriage certificates made me consider the impact of a market mindset on marriage.

Pornography, Self-Government, and the ‘Res Publica’
Aaron Taylor, Ethika Politika

In a properly constituted republic – precisely because government is something that we as a people do to ourselves – laws cannot be envisaged as an imposition by the state on the body politic, as if the government were merely an external force.

Blog author: jcarter
posted by on Wednesday, August 7, 2013

At Christian Companies, Religious Principles Complement Business Practices
Mark Oppenheimer, New York Times,

“Are people able to live out their own agency by making a contribution in the workplace?” is, according to Mr. Hicks, a question Christians should ask. Do employees have meaningful work, or just repetitive, low-paid, mind-numbing work?

How the Gospel Affects Our Work
Matt Heerema, Stonebrook Church

Could it be that our work at writing code, processing insurance claims, changing diapers, building houses, growing crops, or studying differential equations matter to God?

Trade and Cheez-Its: How to Teach Economics to Your Toddler
Wesley Gant, Values & Capitalism

Economics can be a dry subject. Finding a way to illustrate its principles in a way that is informative and fun is like figuring out a difficult magic trick: Once we figure out the trick, we want to show everyone.

Does Religion Matter?
Donald Devine, American Conservative Union

We would argue that America’s historic religion transmitted from Europe has been critical to the West’s spectacular rise as reported in the second table above and to its maintenance over a long period of time as demonstrated in the first for the same reason.

Blog author: jcarter
posted by on Tuesday, August 6, 2013

Solzhenitsyn and the Russian Renaissance
Andrew Doran, First Things

“The entire twentieth century,” Solzhenitsyn observed in his 1983 Templeton Lecture, was “sucked into the vortex of atheism and self-destruction.”

Why Jesus and Comic Books Need Each Other | Book of Revelation Graphic Novel
American Orthodox Institute

An interview on FOX News with Fr. Mark Arey of the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese on transforming the book of Revelation into a graphic novel.

Loving God’s Law: the Key to A Flourishing Society?
Gabrielle Jackson, Institute for Faith, Work, and Economics

Love plays a significant role in how we build social structures such as the family, the church, our business, and our economy. But what does love have to do with the law? And if the rule of law is an essential pillar of a flourishing society, how should Christians think biblically about law?

How to Help Fast-Food Workers
Sheldon Richman, Reason

Raising the minimum wage will hurt, not help.

Blog author: jcarter
posted by on Monday, August 5, 2013

Syria’s sorrowing clergy
The Economist

For people concerned about the fate about Syria’s Christian minority, these are dark times. It has now been exactly 100 days since two bishops from the ancient city of Aleppo were kidnapped near the Turkish border, and there is no definite news of their fate.

Seeing What We Want to See: Millennials Look at Government, Capitalism and Religion
Josh Good, Values & Capitalism

Psychological discouragement among younger Americans runs deep. The Silent Generation (ages 66-88) is the only group for whom a majority still thinks they are better off than their parents’ generation.

Privacy and Common Core
Paul Kengor, Crisis Magazine

FERPA is the Federal Education Rights and Privacy Act of 1974. Changes have been made to FERPA that (some believe) will leave parents uninformed as to how their children’s records are shared.

Tradition, Business, and Culture
Vincent Bacote, Institute for Faith, Work, and Economics

A prominent feature of Eastern Orthodoxy is the emphasis on the participation in the liturgy, an experience that can be literally described as a trip to heaven. Those who encounter this liturgy for the first time find it an experience of sensory overload in sound, sight, and smell.

Blog author: jcarter
posted by on Friday, August 2, 2013

Saudi activist receives 7-year sentence, 600 lashes for insulting Islam
Ed Payne and Mohammed Jamjoom, CNN

A Saudi court has sentenced a activist to seven years in prison and 600 lashes for violating the nation’s anti-cybercrime law, Human Rights Watch reported Wednesday.

An Environmental Conservatism?
Peter Blair, Public Discourse

Roger Scruton argues that conservatism is a better home for good environmental policy than liberalism.

Yes, Threats to Religious Liberty Happen Here
Ryan T. Anderson, National Review

Advocates of same-sex marriage are classifying Biblical teachings as “hate speech.”

Conservative Catholics and the New Pope
Ross Douthat, New York Times

Why it might actually be good for conservative Catholics in America to have a pope who makes them a little more uncomfortable, and (what’s left of) the American church’s liberal wing a little more enthusiastic, than either John Paul II or Benedict did.

Blog author: jcarter
posted by on Thursday, August 1, 2013

Happy Birthday, Milton Friedman: Champion of Educational Freedom
Brittany Corona, The Foundry

On the late, great, Nobel Prize–winning economist Milton Friedman’s 101st birthday, it is fitting to remember his legacy of school choice and continue the fight for educational opportunity he left for us.

My “Success” Story: What I Learned from Jesus and John Wooden
Tyler Castle, Values & Capitalism

Our culture tells us two hopeful, but also damaging, lies about success. They are: 1) “If you work hard enough, you can be anything you want to be;” and 2) “You can be the best in the world.”

Why U.S. International Religious Freedom Policy Fails
George Weigel, First Things

According to Dr. Farr, “it would be difficult to name a single country in the world over the past fifteen years where American religious freedom policy has helped reduce religious persecution or to increase religious freedom in any substantial or sustained way.”

C.S. Lewis and the Three Enemies of Work
Elise Amyx, Institute for Faith, Work, and Economics

While most of us don’t know what it feels like to cram for an exam while bombs are exploding in the distance, we can all relate to feeling that our work isn’t very important from time to time.