Category: PowerLinks

Blog author: jcarter
Friday, February 21, 2014
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Kiev monastery a sanctuary for the bloodied and bruised

Matt Robinson, Reuters

It was a scene of quiet determination and order, a short walk uphill from the black smoke and violence of Independence Square, crucible of a geopolitical battle between Russia and the West.

Dalai Lama: A ‘Marxist’s’ new respect for capitalism
James Pethokoukis, AEI Ideas

A fascinating bit from the Dalai Lama’s chat at a recent AEI event.

Where Does “Separation of Church and State” Come From and What Does It Really Mean?
Justin Taylor, The Gospel Coalition

It’s not uncommon for advocates of the “high and impregnable wall” misunderstanding of the metaphor to suggest that Jefferson’s own policies were incompatible with his own principles (e.g., endorsement of federal funds to build churches, support of Christian missionaries among the Native Americans, etc.).

Inequality’s Inconvenient Truths
Seth Mandel, Commentary

What they need most, then, is job creation. The Brookings study finds that cities with high inequality are better at producing wealth–and for good reason. The job market in such cities tends more toward growth industries.

Blog author: jcarter
Thursday, February 20, 2014
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The Role of Faith in Public Life
Ed Stetzer, Christianity Today

Examining the intersection of faith and politics: What do pastors think?

Going Global: House Hearing Documents Worldwide Persecution of Christians
Andrew E. Harrod , Juicy Ecumenism

Persecution of Christians is the “premier human rights issue of the early 21st century, as well as the most untold story about global Christianity in our time,” Boston Globe reporter John Allen stated in prepared remarks on February 11, 2014.

When Work Disappears
Ross Douthat , New York Times

I don’t think it’s unfair to suggest that this future, however potentially inevitable, would represent a grim retreat from basic American ideals.

Common Core’s Surprise Critic: Nation’s Largest Teachers Union Calls Standards ‘Completely Botched’
Rob Bluey, The Foundry

The country’s largest teachers union is no longer a cheerleader for Common Core national education standards.

Blog author: jcarter
Wednesday, February 19, 2014
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The Truth About the ‘One Percent’
James Piereson, Wall Street Journal

The typical ‘rich’ person works for a salary. Only 18% are in the financial industry.

Alexander Hamilton: An Unorthodox Conservative Mind
Mark DeForrest, The Imaginative Conservative

The dispute over Hamilton’s place within the conservative tribe is a reflection of the unorthodox nature of Hamilton’s approach to politics and law. Yet, Hamilton’s work was essentially conservative in its nature, even if many within current conservative circles are profoundly uncomfortable with much of Hamilton’s legacy.

Bake Us a Cake, or Else!
Ryan T. Anderson & Leslie Ford, National Review

Marriage laws should not treat religious believers as bigots to be purged from the public square.

What Is Stewardship – Really?
Hugh Whelchel, Institute for Faith, Work, and Economics

Many Christians in the church today view stewardship only as giving money to the church. Even those who understand stewardship as the godly management of their time, talent, and treasure are still missing something. We have lost the idea of “whole-life stewardship” taught in the Scriptures.

Blog author: jcarter
Tuesday, February 18, 2014
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Blessing of weapons and Orthodox Christians
Fr. Ernesto Obregon, Ortho Cuban

It is in the context of a forced means of action, in the context of war being an evil, in the context of defending one’s neighbors or restoring justice that has been violated that the prayers over weapons and soldiers takes place.

What Is the US Doing About Religious Persecution Worldwide?
John Burger, Catholic World Report

While President Obama calls religious freedom a “key objective of US foreign policy,” experts question how high a priority combating persecution really is.

When Policy Choices Become Moral Mandates
Stephen M. Krason, Crisis Magazine

Two recent newspaper articles—one in the Catholic and the other in the secular press—illustrate the need to be skeptical about claims that particular public policy approaches are morally necessary.

Why Private Property Rights Help the Poor
Art Lindsley, Institute for Faith, Work, and Economics

In order to be made alive and active, in order to become capital, the land under the feet of the poor—much of which lacks formal ownership—needs to be formalized through property laws that allow these assets to be used for credit like allowing mortgages, loans, etc.

Blog author: jcarter
Monday, February 17, 2014
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The Presidential Bible Class
Tevi Troy, Wall Street Journal

Abraham Lincoln’s diligent reading of the Good Book informed the Gettysburg Address.

The HHS Mandate Meets an Immovable Object
Ken Starr, National Review Online

RFRA was written to be easily strong enough to favor Hobby Lobby.

Yes, the Wealthy Can Be Deserving
N. Gregory Mankiw, New York Times

A fact that’s lost in the inequality debate: The top 1 percent of wage earners often accomplish extraordinary things, and at great risk.

Adoption and Foster Care: An Issue We Can’t Ignore
Kristie Eshelman, Values & Capitalism

“Not everyone can adopt,” Graham noted, “but everyone can care for a child in need,” by supporting a foster care family, financially or otherwise.

Blog author: jcarter
Friday, February 14, 2014
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National Marriage Week: Fight Poverty by Strengthening Marriage
Rachel Sheffield, The Foundry

What’s one of the best ways to ensure a child is protected from poverty? Marriage. As such, it also helps protect families from ending up on welfare.

How the West Won—but “Western Civ” Lost
Rodney Stark, Intercollegiate Review

It’s remarkably unfashionable to study—or even talk about—the West these days.

Labor exploitation threatens millions of African children
Charles Braddix, Baptist Press

Every day millions of children in Africa are at risk of being exploited, resulting in slave-like working conditions. Their childhood is forever lost.

Ayn Rand and Christianity: An Interview with Mark David Henderson
Elise Amyx, Institute for Faith, Work, and Economics

Having grown up with a Christian father and atheist stepfather who adhered to Objectivism, the philosophy of Ayn Rand, Henderson is passionate about reconciling the differences and concentrating on the unity between these two worldviews.

Blog author: jcarter
Thursday, February 13, 2014
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What is the Point of Religious Education?
Leroy Huizenga, Catholic World Report

The best education in the Faith is the practice of the Faith.

Sorry, TNR, America’s Legal System Needs More Justice, Not More Socialism
Gabriel Malor, The Federalist

Under the guise of “fairness,” socialized law would result in less justice, not more.

Should Christians Depend on Government Welfare?
T. Kurt Jaros, Values & Capitalism

By no means is it a necessity that Christians be politically conservative, but it just so happens that many are. A number of these politically conservative Christians also find themselves, from time to time, using the welfare system that is in place.

We need to stop obsessing about “bad” schools
Michael McShane, AEI Ideas

Rather than thinking we can regulate bad schools out of existence, a better goal is to develop a system that continuously improves what we think a “bad” school is.

Blog author: jcarter
Wednesday, February 12, 2014
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Syrian Islamists Defecate in Church, Light Christian Man on Fire
Raheem Kassam, Breitbart

A new documentary short by the Journeyman.TV company operating out of the United Kingdom shows evidence of the targeting of Christians in Syria, and apparent fighting back in the north of the country.

The Mythology And Reality Of Unemployment Benefits
Scott Lincicome, The Federalist

If North Carolina’s experience tells us anything, it’s that the elimination of unemployment benefits not only won’t spell disaster for the American economy, but just might give our stagnant labor market a little boost.

Myth-Making About Economic Inequality
Robert Samuelson, Real Clear Politics

This incontestable reality has made economic inequality a misleading intellectual fad, blamed for many of our problems. Actually, the reverse is true: Economic inequality is usually a consequence of our problems and not a cause.

What the Bible Says about Property
Art Lindsley, Institute for Faith, Work, and Economics

From an economic standpoint, private property is one of the foundations of a free society. But is it biblical? It turns out that the Bible has a lot to say about private property, both in the Old and New Testaments.

Blog author: jcarter
Tuesday, February 11, 2014
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Is The LEGO Movie The Most Subversive Pro-Liberty Film Ever?
Mollie Hemingway, The Federalist

“The LEGO Movie” isn’t just pro-business. It’s also about the importance of hard work, creativity, ownership, innovation and human dignity. There might not be a more classically liberal film in the history of film-making, when it’s all said and done.

Income Mobility Tied to Marriage
Collette Caprara, The Foundry

Recent research from the Equality of Opportunity Project found that “the strongest predictors of upward mobility are measures of family structure such as the fraction of single parents in the area.”

The Biblical Meaning of Success
Hugh Whelchel, The Gospel Coalition

We are called to steward all we have been given.

Is the Vatican Violating Children’s Rights?
Mark Movsesian, First Things

Here is the latest evidence of the clash between contemporary human rights norms and traditional religions. Last week, the UN’s Committee on the Rights of the Child reported on the Vatican’s compliance with an international treaty, the Convention on the Rights of the Child.

Blog author: jcarter
Monday, February 10, 2014
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In defense of the official poverty measure
Robert Doar, AEI Ideas

In leaving out all that government does to help the poor, the official measure focuses on what poor Americans are able to earn for themselves. It is a measure of their independence and ability to work and earn a sufficient amount to support themselves and their families on their own – which is what they want.

Why Unemployment is High in Parts of Michigan
Stephen Moore, The Foundry

The Motor City’s meltdown has overshadowed the muscular economic recovery in this region, whose success reflects a manufacturing and technology renaissance.

War on Poverty Needs New Strategy
Josh Good, The American

Since LBJ’s War on Poverty was launched, America has witnessed an unprecedented rise in cohabitation, divorce, and out-of-wedlock births. In 2014, reforms should promote personal dignity and encourage work and responsible fatherhood.

Global poverty is falling dramatically and so is global inequality, so why the obsession about inequality?
Mark J. Perry, AEI Ideas

In a recent article, Matt Ridley presents some of the facts behind the inequality debate and points out that despite the overblown obsession with inequality, few people are aware that at the global level, both inequality and poverty are falling dramatically.