Category: PowerLinks

Blog author: jcarter
Friday, September 5, 2014
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It’s Hard to be Saints in the City
Steven Malanga, City Journal

A new documentary shows how Benedictine monks make men out of Newark’s boys.

Michael Novak’s Moral Compass
Mark Michalski, RealClearReligion

Michael Novak has been a theologian, philanthropist, and activist throughout his long life. But, ultimately, he has remained a great writer, teacher, theologian, and philosopher. Through his experiences, his humble beginnings and sensitive, poetic soul, he describes and explains the socio-economic, political and cultural marvels of our contemporary world.

We Cannot Afford To View Children As Commodities
Allison Kieselowsky, The Federalist

Here’s how to think about the new figure claiming children cost their parents a quarter-million to raise.

Locked Out: A Hair Braider Fights Occupational Licensing
Nick Gillespie & Todd Krainin, Reason

Melony Armstrong just wanted to earn an honest living. Armstrong had learned how to braid hair, and she had the drive to open her own salon in Tupelo, Mississippi. What she didn’t have was a state license to practice cosmetology.

Blog author: jcarter
Wednesday, September 3, 2014
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Rule of Law: The Great Foundation of Our Constitution
Matthew Spalding, The Imaginative Conservative

The rule of law may be the most significant and influential accomplishment of Western constitutional thinking. The very meaning and structure of our Constitution embody this principle. Nowhere expressed yet evident throughout the Constitution, this bedrock concept is the first principle on which the American legal and political system was built.

The Simple Lesson We Should Learn from Global Economics
Daniel J. Mitchell, The Federalist

Hopefully you can understand why I have a tiny (very tiny) degree of sympathy for my left-wing friends. It can’t be easy to hold views that are so inconsistent with global evidence.

The Subtle Sins of the Workplace
John Kyle, Institute for Faith, Work, and Economics

Most of our sins are subtle and barely perceptible. In the workplace, they might involve casting dispersions and stirring up controversy, gossiping about a colleague, or fudging our timecard.

ISIS terror threat gives impetus to ‘just war,’ strategists say
David Roach, Baptist Press

With ISIS beheading a second American journalist and controlling a large section of Iraq and Syria, analysts say military action against the terrorist group aligns with traditional just war principles.

Blog author: jcarter
Wednesday, September 3, 2014
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The Myth of Catholic Social Teaching
John Zmirak, The Catholic Thing

Self-styled Catholic critics of the free market and “Americanism” have adopted the term “social Magisterium” to suggest that there is a coherent and morally binding body of papal teaching on politics and economics, from which we can derive specific policy initiatives and firmly condemn alternatives as “un-Catholic” or even (that dreaded word) “dissenting.”

Business and Conscience
Greg Forster, First Things

The president has discovered that businesses are people, and have a conscience.

The Five Stages of Religious Persecution
Msgr. Charles Pope, Archdiocese of Washington

The usual transformation from respect to vilification progresses in stages that grow in intensity. And thus the Catholic Church, once a respected aspect of American life (along with the Protestant denominations), has become increasingly marginalized and even hated by many.

5 Lessons for Balancing Work and Ambition
Tyler O’Neil, Values & Capitalism

While ambition can drive us to pursue more valuable work, it often becomes a huge stumbling block to a joyous life. It can even halt career advancement and prevent you from enjoying your work.

Blog author: jcarter
Tuesday, September 2, 2014
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Metropolitan Hilarion Alfeyev: No Winners in a World War
Metropolitan Hilarion Alfeyev, Breitbart

A century ago, the First World War began. On 28 July 1914, Austria-Hungary declared war on Serbia, then on 1 August, Germany declared war on Russia, and over the course of a few short days, several more world powers joined the conflict either on their own initiative or by needs.

Climate Change Costs By 2100: Doing Nothing Has the Same Price Tag as Doing Something
Ronald Bailey, Reason

Adapting to climate change would cost roughly the same as trying to slow it.

Spontaneous Charity Is Good; Thoughtful Charity Is Even Better
Jayme Metzgar, The Federalist

What’s better than the Ice Bucket Challenge? These six steps for thoughtful charity giving.

This map shows where slavery and forced labor are happening around the world
James Pethokoukis, AEI Ideas

An estimated ~21-30m people are in slavery around the world, including forced labour, bonded labour, human trafficking and child slavery.

Blog author: jcarter
Monday, September 1, 2014
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India Christians Still Await Justice Six Years After Radical Hindu Attack
Anto Akkara, Aleteia

But Hindus and Muslim join Christians in solidarity march to mark anniversary.

Are Churches Being Crowded out of Poverty Alleviation Efforts?
Anne Bradley, Institute for Faith, Work, and Economics

Prior to the Great Depression, most aid was provided through families, church communities, and other decentralized institutions. Today there are 126 separate and often overlapping government anti-poverty programs.

Thuggery wins, free speech rights lose
Eugene Volokh, Washington Post

Behavior that gets rewarded gets repeated. People who are willing to use violence to suppress speech will learn that such behavior is effective, at least when the police don’t come down particularly hard on the thuggery.

Many religions heavily concentrated in one or two countries
Conrad Hackett and Joseph Naylor, Pew Research Center

While Christians and Muslims are more widely distributed around the world, the other groups have a majority of their populations in just one or two nations, according to 2010 estimates from our Global Religious Landscape report.

Blog author: jcarter
Friday, August 29, 2014
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Hobby Lobby without God
James Bruce, Library of Law and Liberty

The book is founded in a great hope: that religious believers can be persuaded that they have more in common with atheists than they may think, and vice versa.

Classical Education, Freedom, and the Ordered Soul
James V. Schall, S.J., Catholic World Report

Understanding is a spiritual thing, though rooted in really existing things, even ultimately in divine things.

Modern Bondage: Slavery is Very Much Alive Today
Mark Gordon, Aleteia

From Nigerian schoolgirls to sex trafficking in the US, the total number would fill California.

Poor Americans Need Hope, Not Stigma
Brandon Smith, The Federalist

Conservatives should fight for Americans struggling to get by, not stigmatize them.

Blog author: jcarter
Wednesday, August 27, 2014
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Zero Tolerance? Zero Common Sense
Susan E. Wills, Aleteia

You know the public school system is in trouble when a kindergartener is suspended for talking about her Hello Kitty bubble blower gun.

In Thailand’s Surrogacy Industry, Profit and a Moral Quagmire
Thomas Fuller, New York Times

The baby boomlet here was just one of several bizarre and often ethically charged iterations of Thailand’s freewheeling venture into what detractors call the womb rental business, an unguided experiment that the country’s military government now says it is planning to end.

Why Your City or Town Could Be the Next Step for Right-to-Work
James Sherk & Andrew Kloster, The Corner

Should workers have to pay union dues to keep their job? Unions think so — their contracts require companies to fire workers who do not pay up. Fortunately, many states have passed “right-to-work” (RTW) laws that prohibit this coercion.

How Faith, Work, and Economics Transformed Milwaukee
Lauren Carl, Institute for Faith, Work, and Economics

As Woodson demonstrated in Milwaukee, CNE goes into an area like a “Geiger counter” and identifies grassroots leaders, people with strengths who are already present in these areas.

Blog author: jcarter
Wednesday, August 27, 2014
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Patriarch: While Politicians Argue, Iraqi Christians Continue to Die
John Burger, Aleteia

In latest appeal, Chaldean leader describes conditions in refugee camps.

Thomas More: Virtuous Statesman
John M. Vella, The Imaginative Conservative

In Thomas More on Statesmanship, Wegemer, who teaches English literature at the University of Dallas, portrays a man who successfully synthesized the Christian humanism of his time with a deep appreciation of the broader legal and political traditions of England.

Distributionism vs Plutoyperetonism
John C. Wright

For better or worse, my take on Distributism is uniformly and unabashedly negative. You see, I had studied economics for many a year before I stumbled across the writings of Mr Chesterton, and I found him wise and witty and much to be admired in all other areas but this one.

Back to School: The Transformational Impact of School Vouchers
Virginia Walden Ford, The Daily Signal

Another summer has come to an end. As I’ve been looking toward the new school year, I have had a chance to reflect on all the children who have touched my life over the past few years.

Blog author: jcarter
Tuesday, August 26, 2014
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Global religious hot spots get their own U.S. envoy
Lauren Markoe, Religion News Service

As the Islamic State tears across Iraq and Syria this summer, sending religious minorities fleeing for their lives, Congress created a new job at the State Department — one the president needs to fill immediately, say those who pushed for the position.

Heroic Sisters
Tom Hoopes, Aleteia

Some very gutsy religious who are, by the way, faithful to Church teaching.

12 Things You Need To Know About Government Unions
Stan Greer, The Federalist

The recent Supreme Court decision in Harris v. Quinn has shifted forced unionism across the country.

Twenty-One Words That Describe Christian Leadership
Glenn Brooke, Institute for Faith, Work, and Economics

There may be no better summary of the characteristics of leaders than this, from the final instructions Paul gives at the end of 1 Corinthians.

Blog author: jcarter
Monday, August 25, 2014
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New HHS Rules Still Problematic for Religious Liberty
Barrett Duke and Andrew T. Walker, ERLC

When a law is revised eight times, it’s worth asking whether or not it should ever have been enacted in the first place.

The Korean Martyrs and the Power of Lay Witness
Marge Fenelon, Aleteia

The throngs who greeted Pope Francis in Korea are testimony to the power of the laity to spread the Faith.

Study: A fourth of public school spending goes to salaries and benefits of nonteachers
James Pethokoukis, AEI Ideas

A new Thomas B. Fordham Institute study finds that the number of non-teaching staff in the United States has grown by 130% since 1970. These three millions employers now account for half of the public school workforce with their salaries and benefits absorbing one-quarter of current education spending.

Emotional Storms Are No Response for Disasters
Amity Shlaes, National Review

A new study shows that government aid and World Bank projects are not enough to spur lasting recovery.