Category: PowerLinks

Blog author: jcarter
Wednesday, September 24, 2014
By

Climate Change Costs By 2100: Doing Nothing Has the Same Price Tag as Doing Something
Ronald Bailey , Reason

Adapting to climate change would cost roughly the same as trying to slow it.

Will Someone Explain Christianity To The New York Times?
Mollie Hemingway, The Federalist

Collecting egregious errors about basic Christian teachings is a hobby of mine and The New York Times gives me some of my favorite examples.

Spontaneous Charity Is Good; Thoughtful Charity Is Even Better
Jayme Metzgar, The Federalist

What’s better than the Ice Bucket Challenge? These six steps for thoughtful charity giving.

100 Christians, Including Children, Arrested During Major House Church Raid in China
Stoyan Zaimov, Christian Post

Over 100 Christians, including children, were arrested during a major house church raid on Sunday in Foshan city in China’s Guangdong Province. Close to 200 police officers stormed in during the service, eyewitnesses said, believed to be part of a large-scale crackdown on Christians in the country.

Blog author: jcarter
Tuesday, September 23, 2014
By

Let Sikh Americans Serve in the U.S. Military
Simran Jeet Singh, On Faith

Why we should repeal the ban against turbaned Sikhs in the Armed Forces.

Understanding America’s ridiculously large $17 trillion economy by comparing US metro areas to entire countries
Mark J. Perry, AEI Ideas

The table above helps to put America’s ridiculously large $17 trillion economy (GDP in 2013) into perspective by comparing America’s largest 20 metro economies in 2013 based on data released today by the BEA) to the economies of entire countries with similar GDPs in 2013.

Report Finds Slight Growth in Population of Inmates
Erick Eckholm, New York Times

Breaking three consecutive years of decline, the number of people in state and federal prisons climbed slightly in 2013, according to a report released Tuesday, a sign that deeper changes in sentencing practices will be necessary if the country’s enormous prison population is to be significantly reduced.

Women religious fight human trafficking
Michael O’Loughlin, Crux

They traverse an “underground railroad” system as they make their escape from their captors. They stay in safe houses, scattered across the country to hide and protect them.

Blog author: jcarter
Monday, September 22, 2014
By

Are We Catholics First or Americans First?
Heather King, Aleteia

The law of the land and the Higher Law.

Indentured Insomnia: Why the Poor Can’t Sleep at Night
Orion D. Jones, Big Think

How much sleep you get is strongly correlated with how much money you make, according to a Gallup poll that compared annual income with people’s average nightly rest.

Surviving childhood in Africa
BBC

Significant progress has been made in cutting child mortality, which is falling faster globally than at any point in the past two decades, according to Unicef. But despite that, more than six million children die every year before the age of five, mostly from preventable causes.

How Obamacare Forces You to Subsidize Plans That Cover Elective Abortion
Sarah Torre, The Daily Signal

Today, the Government Accountability Office (GAO) confirms that’s just another broken promise. Here are three things you need to know about abortion and Obamacare.

Blog author: jcarter
Friday, September 19, 2014
By

Major League Baseball’s human-trafficking problem
Dara Lind, Vox

Cuba is one of the biggest sources of international baseball talent. But, because of the US embargo, most Cuban players have to use smugglers to get themselves to the United States. What’s more, due to a quirk in Major League Baseball rules around contracts, those Cuban players often first have to travel to a third country, like Mexico — a difficult process.

The Heart of the Gendercide Problem
Elizabeth Gerhardt, Christianity Today

What the church can do to address the issues underlying global violence against women.

The Illusion of Neutrality
Anthony Esolen, Public Discourse

The secular state cannot be neutral in matters of religion.

A Tale of Two Churches
Francis Cardinal George, O.M.I., Aleteia

What happens when the State establishes itself as a rival religion through administrative coercion?

Blog author: jcarter
Thursday, September 18, 2014
By

The Church of U2
Joshua Rothman, The New Yorker

[E]ven critics and fans who say that they know about U2’s Christianity often underestimate how important it is to the band’s music, and to the U2 phenomenon. The result has been a divide that’s unusual in pop culture. While secular listeners tend to think of U2’s religiosity as preachy window dressing, religious listeners see faith as central to the band’s identity.

Closing the Racial Gap in Education
Jason L. Riley, The American

The usual explanation for the academic achievement gap is that blacks come from a lower socioeconomic background and their schools have fewer resources. But research finds the problem transcends class and its roots lie elsewhere.

A Win-Win For Hungry Africans And Environmentalists
Hank Campbell, The Federalist

Environmentalists resist science that can feed the hungry while reducing carbon emissions.

When Reagan and Ratzinger Teamed Up on Faith and Hope
Paul Kengor, The Imaginative Conservative

We need hope, even when hope seems so hopeless. To that end, 30 years ago, Cardinal Ratzinger and Ronald Reagan teamed up with some words of wisdom worth remembering right now.

Blog author: jcarter
Wednesday, September 17, 2014
By

Global Warming Was Worth It
David Harsanyi, The Federalist

Is progress a good thing? Generally speaking, it seems like an easy question – unless, that is, you’re in the “sustainability movement.”

Working Towards a Biblical View of Wealth Creation
Anne Bradley, Institute for Faith, Work, and Economics

The Bible emphasizes repeatedly that where there is not idolatry, wealth creation is not a bad thing. In fact, God desires to bless his children.

The Minimum Wage Can Never Be High Enough
Ike Brannon, The American

The minimum wage is a facile non-solution for the complicated problem of poverty in America.

What the Rich Give to New York
Nicole Gelinas, City Journal

The city’s private wealth pays for its vast public assets—which benefit everyone, especially the poor.

Blog author: jcarter
Tuesday, September 16, 2014
By

Southern California Becoming Less Family-Friendly
Joel Kotkin

The British Talmudic scholar Abraham Cohen noted that, throughout history, children were thought of as “a precious loan from God to be guarded with loving and fateful care.” Yet, increasingly and, particularly, here in Southern California, we are rejecting this loan, and abandoning our role as parents.

The Most Interesting (Business) Man in the World
Hunter Baker, The Imaginative Conservative

A number of readers of this essay will be familiar with the beer company commercials built around “The Most Interesting Man in the World.” This man, a virile and hirsute senior citizen, has moved through his century with peerless confidence and style. When I think of my own candidate for the most interesting man, I find that Peter Drucker (1909–2005) comes to mind.

Housing Market Not ‘Too Big To Fail,’ But ‘Too Regulated To Succeed’
Erik Telford, The Federalist

The Obama administration is again destabilizing the housing market and seizing investors’ returns on their money.

Finding Purpose in Your Work Means Joining God in His
Timothy Ewest, Institute for Faith, Work, and Economics

God is setting out to redeem the world, and he chooses the everyday lives of men and woman to carry out his plan – really! God calls us to join him, and this calling historically has happened in three ways.

Blog author: jcarter
Monday, September 15, 2014
By

World May Be in Beginnings of World War III, Pope Suggests
Aleteia

Praying for war dead at Italian WWI Memorial, Francis condemns apathy toward ongoing conflict.

Eden Cast Out: Progressives Take Aim At A Traditional Organic Food Company
Fr. Benedict Kiely, Daily Caller

There is nothing quite so intolerant as a vegan, Buddhist, Gaia-loving, health food store owner.

Poverty, Not Climate Change, Bigger Concern for China and India
David Kreutzer, The Daily Signal

Poverty is deadly. For instance, snake bites kill nearly 50,000 people per year in India (also see here) because poverty, especially rural poverty, limits access to appropriate medical care. In addition, the availability of refrigeration, needed to preserve many types of anti-venom, is severely restricted in India.

Religious Employers to Go Ahead With Contraception Lawsuits
Louise Radnofsky, Wall Street Journal

Sign that Obama administration compromise won’t end legal battle.

Blog author: jcarter
Friday, September 12, 2014
By

Churches Offer Sanctuary to Immigrants in Danger of Deportation
Miriam Jordan, Wall Street Journal

Campaign follows Obama decision to delay action that might have staved off removal.

Evidence Grows of Russian Orthodox Clergy’s Aiding Ukraine Rebels
Andrew Higgins, New York Times

The Russian Orthodox Church, like the Kremlin, has strenuously denied any role in stirring up or aiding separatist turmoil in Ukraine. But as Slovyansk and other towns seized by pro-Russian rebels have fallen over the summer to a since-stalled Ukrainian government offensive in the east, evidence has begun to accumulate of close ties between the church, or at least individual Orthodox priests, and the pro-Russian cause.

Intervarsity Christian Ministry In Trouble For Acting Christian
Andrew Walker, First Things

To protect against discrimination, liberals increasingly seek to discriminate. News broke over the weekend that all twenty-three schools within the California State University system have taken steps to “derecognize” InterVarsity Christian Fellowship (IVCF), a para-church Christian ministry organization that’s had a longstanding presence within university life religious settings.

Now for a Really Destructive Innovation: A Europe-wide State
Theodore Dalrymple, Library of Law and Liberty

The best hope for the European Union would be for it to eventually evolve into an enormous Belgium. More likely, it will evolve into an enormous Yugoslavia circa 1990, which will not be quite so good.

Blog author: jcarter
Thursday, September 11, 2014
By

Naked Consent: Why Personal Speech Codes Won’t Curb a Social Problem Like Sexual Assault
Mark Regnerus, Public Discourse

Speech codes won’t fix what ails a relationship marketplace that aggravates—rather than relieves—the risk of sexual violence. California’s proposed law will simply multiply accusations, legal proceedings, and judicial headaches.

Christ’s teaching on poverty
James Chastek, Just Thomism

The older account of Christ’s elevation of poverty imputes a mystical character to to it, as though the condition itself was a sort of prophesy. The newer account is not mystical but practical and political.

Pope Francis ranked among Washington’s political elite
Michael O’Loughlin, Crux

While he prefers to associate with the poor and marginalized, Pope Francis has shown up on a list of the powerful and elite. Politico Magazine ranked the Argentine-born Catholic leader No. 6 on its “The Politico 50” list, dubbing him “Washington’s Favorite Populist.”

How the Rise in School Choice Helps All of Us
Ed Feulner, The Daily Signal

America is built on the philosophy of bootstrapping, or pulling yourself up through your own talents and abilities. No tool is better suited for doing that than a good education.