Category: PowerLinks

Blog author: jcarter
Friday, September 4, 2015

Prepare yourselves: The Great Migration will be with us for decades
Fraser Nelson, The Telegraph

It is not war, but money, that drives people abroad. That is not going to change any time soon

Who are ‘cultural Catholics’?
David Masci, Pew Research Center

The share of Americans whose primary religious affiliation is Catholic has fallen somewhat in recent years, and now stands at about one-in-five. But according to a new Pew Research Center survey of U.S. Catholics and others, an additional one-in-ten American adults (9%) consider themselves Catholic or partially Catholic in other ways, even though they do not self-identify as Catholic on the basis of religion.

The Two Strategic Approaches to Fighting Poverty
Richard Reeves, RealClearMarkets

There are two strategic approaches to tackling poverty. Strategy 1: raise the incomes of those with low incomes. Strategy 2: reduce the knock-on effects of having a low income on housing, schooling, safety, health or health care.

On the Bargaining Power of Workers
Alex Tabarrok, Marginal Revolution

Buyers don’t compete against sellers, buyers compete against other buyers (and sellers compete against other sellers). Firms buy labor and they are competing primarily not against workers but against other firms. Firms versus Firms! Now that is a real battle!

Blog author: jcarter
Thursday, September 3, 2015

Puerto Rico’s religious leaders call for federal debt intervention
Joshua Mcelwee, Vatican Insider

A coalition of religious leaders, including five Catholic bishops, called Monday for the U.S. Federal Reserve to step in and restructure Puerto Rico’s $72 billion debt.

The Truth About Wages in Right-to-Work States
Natalie Johnson, The Daily Signal

Private sector wages are not reduced in right-to-work states as union advocates have argued, according to a new report released Tuesday by The Heritage Foundation.

How America Lost Track of Ben Franklin’s Definition of Success
John Paul Rollert, The Atlantic

According to Franklin, what mattered in business was humility, restraint, and discipline. But today’s Type-A MBAs would find him qualified for little more than a career in middle management.

Hunter-Gatherer Economics and Sustainability
Arnold Kling, askblog

To many environmentalists, sustainability means leaving the world the way you found it. I think that this may reflect the instincts of a hunter-gatherer.

Blog author: jcarter
Wednesday, September 2, 2015

Why are Black and Hispanic Evangelicals More Favorable Toward the Prosperity Gospel?
Joe Carter, TGC

A new survey finds that black and Hispanic evangelicals are more likely than white evangelicals to say they have a favorable view of “prosperity gospel” preachers, believe wealth is a sign of God’s favor, and believe that prayer can improve their wealth.

The dharma of dollars: What Buddhism says about money and meaning

Buddhism, which holds that wealth is temporary and no path to happiness, might not sound like the best source for money wisdom. Not so, says Ethan Nichtern, the prominent Buddhist teacher, who has written a new book, “The Road Home,” on self-awareness and spiritual seeking.

The Link Between Political and Economic Freedom
Julius Kairey, The Daily Signal

More than 50 years ago, Milton Friedman’s seminal work “Capitalism and Freedom” reminded Americans of the founding principles that made us greatest nation on Earth (economic and political freedom, individualism, and the rule of law).

Let’s hear our next president’s views on poverty
Angela Rachidi, AEI Ideas

More than five years into the economic recovery, the rate of families in poverty is still worse than before President Obama took office. Our next president should articulate an approach that will do better.

Blog author: jcarter
Tuesday, September 1, 2015

Katrina 10 Years Later: Disaster Recovery and the Political Economy of Everyday Life
Peter Boetkke, Mercatus Center

It is important to explain this history because it was in this intellectual context that the events around Hurricane Katrina have to be understood in order to appreciate our rationale behind undertaking the Gulf Coast Recovery Project in 2005 and continuing it to this day.

The Moral Argument Against the Minimum Wage
Ben R. Crenshaw

The minimum wage is immoral. To understand why, we must first explore its social and economic dimensions.

What Malcolm Gladwell Gets Wrong About Poverty
Robert Doar, The Federalist

In discussing the Hurricane Katrina victims who left New Orleans, Malcolm Gladwell ignores a major factor contributing to modern U.S. poverty.

The Economic Cost of Truancy
Emily Deruy, The Atlantic

It doesn’t matter how good a school is if students don’t show up to class.

Blog author: jcarter
Monday, August 31, 2015

Want To Save The Arts? Support Capitalism
Joseph Sunde, The Federalist

Capitalism has brought about the shift from record companies as investment banks to individual artists as rogue entrepreneurs.

What happened when Brad Pitt and his architects came to rebuild New Orleans
Peter Whoriskey , Washington Post

After Hurricane Katrina, movie star Brad Pitt descended on New Orleans to help rebuild the Lower Ninth, one of the city’s hardest hit neighborhoods. … Now, ten years after the storm, one might ask: What has all that talent achieved?

The Next Front in the War on Religious Freedom
David Harsanyi,

Stop bellyaching about Washington. All the country’s best fascists are on your local city council.

True Calling
Alan Wheatley, International Monetary Fund

There are many development economists, but Sabina Alkire is one of the few who is also an ordained priest.

Blog author: jcarter
Friday, August 28, 2015

The 14th Amendment, Immigration, and Citizenship
The Claremont Institute

A heated national conversation about birthright citizenship and the 14th Amendment is currently underway, with many politicians, pundits, and scholars on both the Right and Left getting it wrong.

A Key to Increasing Economic Mobility
Ron Haskins, RealClearMarkets

The Council of Economic Advisors (CEA) recently released an important and timely report on occupational licensing. The recommendations of “Occupational Licensing: A Framework for Policymakers,” fit nicely with two growing realizations about jobs in the middle of the skill and wage distribution.

Slaying the Hydra: Can Virtue Heal the American Right?
Rachel Lu, Public Discourse

The modern administrative state and our militant secular culture are like two heads of a single hydra. To destroy the beast, we must deal with the monster in its totality.

Why this #BlackLivesMatter supporter opposes a minimum wage hike in St. Louis
Lydia DePillis, Washington Post

St. Louis Alderman Antonio French thinks the city needs to hang on to the jobs it already has.

Blog author: jcarter
Thursday, August 27, 2015

Here’s What the Biblical View of Freedom Means for Your Life
Art Lindsley, Institute for Faith, Work, and Economics

Believers should be the most free to enjoy life and God’s creation, as long as it is within the structure of how God has made us. We are not free from God-ordained obligations, but we are free to live life as God intended it to be lived.

Germany’s “Green” Transition Is Gouging Its Poor
The American Interest

Germany’s vaunted energy transition—its energiewende—has been extraordinarily costly to the German consumer, and those costs aren’t going anywhere.

When Schools Are Forced to Practice Race-Based Discipline
Adrienne Green, The Atlantic

Students of color are expelled and suspended at disproportionate rates. Educators say policies banning “disparate-impact” discipline are not the answer.

26% of employers could face the ‘Cadillac tax’ on health insurance
Carolyn Johnson, Washington Post

The next fight over the Affordable Care Act may center on one of its most powerful provisions to contain health care costs — the “Cadillac tax” on the most generous health insurance plans.

Blog author: jcarter
Wednesday, August 26, 2015

Should Christians Lie to End Abortion?
Ray Nothstine, Christian Post

Is it ethical for Christians to deceive with undercover videos to further their goals of exposing the immoral behavior of Planned Parenthood and ending abortion?

Troubling Signs of Minimum Wage Damage in Los Angeles
Adam Ozimek, Dismal Scientist

Disagreement in the literature on minimum wages illustrates that different comparisons or controls can easily give different answers. However, as I’ve been watching the data, one case is becoming too stark to ignore: Los Angeles.

Critics petition Obama to abolish faith-based hiring bias
Adelle M. Banks, Religion News Service

Concerned that faith-based groups can discriminate in hiring while receiving federal funds, a coalition of 130 organizations told President Obama the policy will tarnish his legacy of fair and equal treatment for all Americans.

Media Ignores New Orleans Success Because It’s Good News on Charters
Richard Whitmire, The Seventy Four

Just for a moment, suppose that convincing evidence emerged from an unimpeachable source showing that one city in the U.S. had dramatically improved its schools for poor and minority students – a feat that has eluded nearly every other city in the country. That would be major national news, right? At the very least worthy of a blurb. A tweet?

Blog author: jcarter
Tuesday, August 25, 2015

Meeting God as an American
David Paul Deavel, Library of Law and Liberty

“When I meet God,” wrote Richard John Neuhaus (1936-2009), “I expect to meet him as an American. Not most importantly as an American, to be sure, but as someone who tried to take seriously, and tried to get others to take seriously, the story of America within the story of the world.”

Should Military Chaplains Be Forced to Conduct Same-Sex Weddings?
Greg Davis, The Daily Signal

Last month, the United States Army celebrated the 240th anniversary of the Army Chaplain Corps. Amidst the celebrations there was also concern: there seems to be a growing threat to religious liberty for military chaplains.

More troubling signs of minimum wage damage on the West Coast, Part II
Mark J. Perry, AEI Ideas

As predicted by economic theory and supported by much of the empirical evidence, minimum wage increases this year in Los Angeles, Seattle and San Francisco are having their expected effect: fewer jobs for hotel workers in Los Angeles and fewer jobs for restaurant workers in Seattle and San Francisco.

The Good City and the Good Citizen
Berny Belvedere, Front Porch Republic

The well-ordered soul is like the well-ordered city — apart from this organizational excellence, human flourishing, whether individually or communally, is just not possible.

Blog author: jcarter
Monday, August 24, 2015

Opposition to Capitalism, Even From a Pope, Hurts the Poor
Michael Rubin, Commentary

While Pope Francis’ upcoming visit to the United States will be seized upon as an opportunity to critique capitalism, it would be far better if it were used to show how opposition to economic freedom does the poor great harm.

What’s Driving the Rapid Growth of Welfare Spending
Paul Winfree, The Daily Signal

The fastest growing category in many state budgets? It’s not education. It’s not infrastructure. It’s welfare spending.

New Study Shows How Free Markets is Breaking India’s Caste System
Opportunity Lives

Free markets have lifted millions of people out of poverty all over the world. Now the power of economic freedom is breaking down the oppressive caste system in India, the world’s most populous democracy.

The Role of Philanthropy in Fostering Work
David Bass, Institute for Faith, Work, and Economics

When we think of charity, helping someone get a job doesn’t immediately come to mind. We’re more likely to hand $20 to a homeless man, provide a holiday meal for a single mom, or donate to a local food pantry. Important as these charitable acts might be, they are geared toward meeting short-term needs. What about the long-term welfare of men and women who are struggling?