Category: PowerLinks

Blog author: jcarter
Friday, September 12, 2014
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Churches Offer Sanctuary to Immigrants in Danger of Deportation
Miriam Jordan, Wall Street Journal

Campaign follows Obama decision to delay action that might have staved off removal.

Evidence Grows of Russian Orthodox Clergy’s Aiding Ukraine Rebels
Andrew Higgins, New York Times

The Russian Orthodox Church, like the Kremlin, has strenuously denied any role in stirring up or aiding separatist turmoil in Ukraine. But as Slovyansk and other towns seized by pro-Russian rebels have fallen over the summer to a since-stalled Ukrainian government offensive in the east, evidence has begun to accumulate of close ties between the church, or at least individual Orthodox priests, and the pro-Russian cause.

Intervarsity Christian Ministry In Trouble For Acting Christian
Andrew Walker, First Things

To protect against discrimination, liberals increasingly seek to discriminate. News broke over the weekend that all twenty-three schools within the California State University system have taken steps to “derecognize” InterVarsity Christian Fellowship (IVCF), a para-church Christian ministry organization that’s had a longstanding presence within university life religious settings.

Now for a Really Destructive Innovation: A Europe-wide State
Theodore Dalrymple, Library of Law and Liberty

The best hope for the European Union would be for it to eventually evolve into an enormous Belgium. More likely, it will evolve into an enormous Yugoslavia circa 1990, which will not be quite so good.

Blog author: jcarter
Thursday, September 11, 2014
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Naked Consent: Why Personal Speech Codes Won’t Curb a Social Problem Like Sexual Assault
Mark Regnerus, Public Discourse

Speech codes won’t fix what ails a relationship marketplace that aggravates—rather than relieves—the risk of sexual violence. California’s proposed law will simply multiply accusations, legal proceedings, and judicial headaches.

Christ’s teaching on poverty
James Chastek, Just Thomism

The older account of Christ’s elevation of poverty imputes a mystical character to to it, as though the condition itself was a sort of prophesy. The newer account is not mystical but practical and political.

Pope Francis ranked among Washington’s political elite
Michael O’Loughlin, Crux

While he prefers to associate with the poor and marginalized, Pope Francis has shown up on a list of the powerful and elite. Politico Magazine ranked the Argentine-born Catholic leader No. 6 on its “The Politico 50” list, dubbing him “Washington’s Favorite Populist.”

How the Rise in School Choice Helps All of Us
Ed Feulner, The Daily Signal

America is built on the philosophy of bootstrapping, or pulling yourself up through your own talents and abilities. No tool is better suited for doing that than a good education.

Blog author: jcarter
Wednesday, September 10, 2014
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Obama Administration ‘Doubles Down’ on Fight Against Nuns
Kelsey Harkness, The Daily Signal

The Obama administration has decided to continue its legal battle against Little Sisters of the Poor, a Catholic charity that objects to Obamacare’s mandate that employee health plans cover contraceptives and abortion-inducing drugs.

Pope’s money man tightens control over the power of the purse
Inés San Martín, Crux

In another milestone along the path to financial reform, Pope Francis’ new “Council for the Economy” met for the third time Thursday, among other things working out details for transfering the Vatican’s power of the purse ever more completely to Australian Cardinal George Pell.

A Humane Economy versus Economism
Ralph Ancil, The Imaginative Conservative

In the past, the emphasis was on the man of leisure who, acting as an independent or relatively self-sufficient individual, was able to spend time contemplating the higher aspects of life out of love for the good.

It’s Hard to be Saints in the City
Steven Malanga, City Journal

A new documentary shows how Benedictine monks make men out of Newark’s boys.

Blog author: jcarter
Tuesday, September 9, 2014
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The Catholic casino conundrum
Mathew N. Schmalz, Crux

Gambling is not prohibited for Catholics, but it’s a hard sell under Francis.

Surrogacy Gives Birth to an Unusual Alliance
Christopher White, Wall Street Journal

Ethical concerns about paying for babies bridge the sacred-secular gap.

The Lie Poverty Tells Us
Grace Biskie, Christianity Today

It’s hard for the poor to see that we are not our poverty… but not for Jesus.

What Are the Historical Practices of Christians in the Workplace?
Timothy West, Institute for Faith, Work, and Economics

We have forgotten the sacred rhythms of work, going back to and beyond the founding of this nation. Sacred work rhythms which Christians have long embraced and have passed along down through the centuries.

Blog author: jcarter
Monday, September 8, 2014
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Religious divides persist heading into fall campaign
Michael Lipka, Pew Research

Issues at the intersection of religion and politics – including objections to parts of the Affordable Care Act, battles over same-sex marriage laws and a push for new state laws seeking to restrict access to abortions – have been a part of public debate since the 2010 midterm elections.

Rape and Rotherham
Ross Douthat, New York Times

So instead of looking for ideological vindication in these stories, it’s better to draw a general lesson. Show me what a culture values, prizes, puts on a pedestal, and I’ll tell you who is likely to get away with rape.

Pope’s money man tightens control over the power of the purse
Inés San Martín, Crux

In another milestone along the path to financial reform, Pope Francis’ new “Council for the Economy” met for the third time Thursday, among other things working out details for transfering the Vatican’s power of the purse ever more completely to Australian Cardinal George Pell.

Prince Charles Offers Prayerful and Financial Support to Iraqi Christians
Greg Daly, Aleteia

Ecumenical leaders gather at Lambeth Palace to voice concern for the persecuted.

Blog author: jcarter
Friday, September 5, 2014
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It’s Hard to be Saints in the City
Steven Malanga, City Journal

A new documentary shows how Benedictine monks make men out of Newark’s boys.

Michael Novak’s Moral Compass
Mark Michalski, RealClearReligion

Michael Novak has been a theologian, philanthropist, and activist throughout his long life. But, ultimately, he has remained a great writer, teacher, theologian, and philosopher. Through his experiences, his humble beginnings and sensitive, poetic soul, he describes and explains the socio-economic, political and cultural marvels of our contemporary world.

We Cannot Afford To View Children As Commodities
Allison Kieselowsky, The Federalist

Here’s how to think about the new figure claiming children cost their parents a quarter-million to raise.

Locked Out: A Hair Braider Fights Occupational Licensing
Nick Gillespie & Todd Krainin, Reason

Melony Armstrong just wanted to earn an honest living. Armstrong had learned how to braid hair, and she had the drive to open her own salon in Tupelo, Mississippi. What she didn’t have was a state license to practice cosmetology.

Blog author: jcarter
Wednesday, September 3, 2014
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Rule of Law: The Great Foundation of Our Constitution
Matthew Spalding, The Imaginative Conservative

The rule of law may be the most significant and influential accomplishment of Western constitutional thinking. The very meaning and structure of our Constitution embody this principle. Nowhere expressed yet evident throughout the Constitution, this bedrock concept is the first principle on which the American legal and political system was built.

The Simple Lesson We Should Learn from Global Economics
Daniel J. Mitchell, The Federalist

Hopefully you can understand why I have a tiny (very tiny) degree of sympathy for my left-wing friends. It can’t be easy to hold views that are so inconsistent with global evidence.

The Subtle Sins of the Workplace
John Kyle, Institute for Faith, Work, and Economics

Most of our sins are subtle and barely perceptible. In the workplace, they might involve casting dispersions and stirring up controversy, gossiping about a colleague, or fudging our timecard.

ISIS terror threat gives impetus to ‘just war,’ strategists say
David Roach, Baptist Press

With ISIS beheading a second American journalist and controlling a large section of Iraq and Syria, analysts say military action against the terrorist group aligns with traditional just war principles.

Blog author: jcarter
Wednesday, September 3, 2014
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The Myth of Catholic Social Teaching
John Zmirak, The Catholic Thing

Self-styled Catholic critics of the free market and “Americanism” have adopted the term “social Magisterium” to suggest that there is a coherent and morally binding body of papal teaching on politics and economics, from which we can derive specific policy initiatives and firmly condemn alternatives as “un-Catholic” or even (that dreaded word) “dissenting.”

Business and Conscience
Greg Forster, First Things

The president has discovered that businesses are people, and have a conscience.

The Five Stages of Religious Persecution
Msgr. Charles Pope, Archdiocese of Washington

The usual transformation from respect to vilification progresses in stages that grow in intensity. And thus the Catholic Church, once a respected aspect of American life (along with the Protestant denominations), has become increasingly marginalized and even hated by many.

5 Lessons for Balancing Work and Ambition
Tyler O’Neil, Values & Capitalism

While ambition can drive us to pursue more valuable work, it often becomes a huge stumbling block to a joyous life. It can even halt career advancement and prevent you from enjoying your work.

Blog author: jcarter
Tuesday, September 2, 2014
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Metropolitan Hilarion Alfeyev: No Winners in a World War
Metropolitan Hilarion Alfeyev, Breitbart

A century ago, the First World War began. On 28 July 1914, Austria-Hungary declared war on Serbia, then on 1 August, Germany declared war on Russia, and over the course of a few short days, several more world powers joined the conflict either on their own initiative or by needs.

Climate Change Costs By 2100: Doing Nothing Has the Same Price Tag as Doing Something
Ronald Bailey, Reason

Adapting to climate change would cost roughly the same as trying to slow it.

Spontaneous Charity Is Good; Thoughtful Charity Is Even Better
Jayme Metzgar, The Federalist

What’s better than the Ice Bucket Challenge? These six steps for thoughtful charity giving.

This map shows where slavery and forced labor are happening around the world
James Pethokoukis, AEI Ideas

An estimated ~21-30m people are in slavery around the world, including forced labour, bonded labour, human trafficking and child slavery.

Blog author: jcarter
Monday, September 1, 2014
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India Christians Still Await Justice Six Years After Radical Hindu Attack
Anto Akkara, Aleteia

But Hindus and Muslim join Christians in solidarity march to mark anniversary.

Are Churches Being Crowded out of Poverty Alleviation Efforts?
Anne Bradley, Institute for Faith, Work, and Economics

Prior to the Great Depression, most aid was provided through families, church communities, and other decentralized institutions. Today there are 126 separate and often overlapping government anti-poverty programs.

Thuggery wins, free speech rights lose
Eugene Volokh, Washington Post

Behavior that gets rewarded gets repeated. People who are willing to use violence to suppress speech will learn that such behavior is effective, at least when the police don’t come down particularly hard on the thuggery.

Many religions heavily concentrated in one or two countries
Conrad Hackett and Joseph Naylor, Pew Research Center

While Christians and Muslims are more widely distributed around the world, the other groups have a majority of their populations in just one or two nations, according to 2010 estimates from our Global Religious Landscape report.