Category: PowerLinks

Blog author: jcarter
Wednesday, October 15, 2014
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Your Tax Dollars At Work: Liberal religious organizations make amnesty pay
Capital Research Center

The federal government is spending hundreds of millions of tax dollars a year to underwrite private care for persons who have entered the country illegally. Much of the money flows into religious nonprofits. The nation’s laws receive less consideration than the appeal of “free” government subsidies, and the causes and harms of illegal immigration are brushed aside.

10 Prerequisites for Prosperity
Harry Veryser, Intercollegiate Review

The significance of this “spontaneous order” is easy to miss. But defenders of free enterprise must recognize that markets do not stand independent of the broader culture; they are inextricably linked to all the other organizations, associations, and political and legal systems that develop organically over time.

A Conversation with Roger Scruton on How to be a Conservative
Richard M. Reinsch, Library of Law and Liberty

This conversation explores Scruton’s argument that a free market depends not only on an Austrian understanding of the need for local knowledge but on traditions that encircle goods, practices, relationships, excepting these from the market itself.

Religious Liberty at a Crossroads?
Gerard V. Bradley, Public Discourse

US religious liberty law is not perfect, but it still deserves our support. Religious exemptions witness to the value of religion as a transcendent good. And nothing in the Supreme Court cases requesting religious liberty exemptions for Muslim citizens undermines that effort.

Blog author: jcarter
Tuesday, October 14, 2014
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Surrogacy: The Twenty-First Century’s New Baby-Making
Christopher White, The Federalist

Pro-surrogacy groups argue it’s time the law recognizes some women as breeders.

Nigeria’s ‘megachurches': a hidden pillar of Africa’s top economy
Tim Cocks, Reuters

When a guesthouse belonging to one of Nigeria’s leading Christian pastors collapsed last month, killing 115 mostly South African pilgrims, attention focused on the multimillion-dollar “megachurches” that form a huge, untaxed sector of Africa’s top economy.

The Liberal Religion of “Tolerance”
Paul G. Kengor, Vision and Values

A new survey by Pew Research finds that when it comes to teaching children, liberals place a far higher priority on teaching “tolerance” than teaching religion. That liberals do this in schools is abundantly clear, but they apparently do it in their homes as well.

Ending Extreme Poverty Top Development Goal for Holy See at UN
Josh Craddock, Aleteia

1.2 billion people live on less than $1.25 per day, Vatican representative points out.

Blog author: jcarter
Monday, October 13, 2014
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John Locke and the Dark Side of Toleration
Bruce Frohnen, Crisis Magazine

It seems likely that most Americans would find John Locke’s definition of a church non-controversial, perhaps even obvious. This shows both how relevant the seventeenth century philosopher remains to our public life, and how detrimental it has been on many levels.

Africans to Westerners at synod: We’ve got our own problems
Inés San Martín, Crux

During the Oct. 5-19 Synod of Bishops on the family, many of the biggest surprises are coming from the African continent, where the challenges vary greatly from those of Europe and the US.

How to teach self-control and reduce economic inequality
Walter Mischel, PBS Newshour

Teaching self-control, or the ability to delay gratification, says Columbia psychologist Walter Mischel, author of “The Marshmallow Test,” has enormous philosophical and policy implications, not the least of which is teaching kids how to save.

Education Savings Accounts Are the Next Generation of School Choice
Lindsey Burke, The Daily Signal

“A blind student in Arizona gets about $21,000 a year,” says Marc Ashton, whose son, Max, is legally blind. That $21,000 represents what Arizona spends to educate a student such as Max in the public-school system.

Blog author: jcarter
Friday, October 10, 2014
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Catholics Revisit ‘Thou Shalt Not Steal’
Michael M. Uhlmann, The Federalist

Two thinkers refresh the debate on Catholic social teaching, explaining that it does not necessarily support the welfare state.

Taxes Make People Care
Joe Pinsker, The Atlantic

Citizens are more eager to stamp out corruption when their own money is on the line.

Supreme court to rule on Abercrombie & Fitch ‘religious bias’ over hijab
Jessica Glenza, The Guardian

The US supreme court has agreed to hear a case accusing the American clothing retailer Abercrombie & Fitch of refusing to hire a Muslim woman who wore a headscarf.

How to Engage Culture as a Christian
Peter Armstrong, On Faith

If we are to live out the “Christ transforming culture” model that Niebuhr espouses, we have to be fully engaged. We have to reflect deeply. We have to ask hard questions, even of our brothers and sisters in Christ.

Blog author: jcarter
Thursday, October 9, 2014
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The Empire of Progressive Poverty
Daniel Greenfield, The Sultan Knish blog

Every resource crisis gives the Empire another reason to consolidate control of resources in the name of the public good, and then eliminate access to those resources in the name of the planetary good.

Virgil: Forgotten American Founder
Bradley J. Birzer, The Imaginative Conservative

The American Founders were Men of the West. For all intents and purposes, they might as well have been the remnants of Numenor, each capable of wielding Anduril.

The Minimum Wage Struggle: Bootleggers and Baptists
Adam Smith and Bruce Yandle, The Federalist

In recent weeks, minimum wage workers protesting their low-wage status have marched in the streets in more than 100 U.S. cities. For example, workers in Charleston SC blocked a main thoroughfare, insisting they be paid $15/hr and receive union membership.

Conscience and Community: Understanding the Freedom of Religion
Richard Garnett, Religious Freedom Project

“Religion,” said Justice William Douglas in his Wisconsin v. Yoder (1972) opinion, is “an individual experience.” The opinion was a partial dissent, and this statement is partially correct. But, it does not tell the entire story.

Blog author: jcarter
Wednesday, October 8, 2014
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Left, Right, Prudence, Principle, And Catholic Social Doctrine
J. Budziszewski, First Things

A long-running battle between the so-called Catholic left and the so-called Catholic right concerns which political issues the Church should speak about and which ones she shouldn’t.

Why I Want To Live Long And Burden My Children
Cheryl Magness, The Federalist

Ezekiel Emanuel wants to die at 75 because he equates worth with productivity. But burdens help us sacrifice our selfishness for love.

Why you should care about a Muslim inmate’s beard
Emily Hardman, CNN

I’m not a Muslim. I’ve never been imprisoned. And I don’t want to grow a beard. But I’m defending the rights of someone who is and does.

Blog author: jcarter
Tuesday, October 7, 2014
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How the Russian Orthodox Church answers Putin’s prayers in Ukraine
Gabriela Baczynska and Tom Heneghan, Reuters

Under Putin, the ROC gets support from the state and powerful oligarchs allied to the Kremlin, while Moscow benefits from its public blessing. A recent poll showed 75 percent of Russians approve of the ROC and more than half value its close ties with the state.

Why The Nationwide Pension Crisis Is An Opportunity To Reinvigorate Society
Lewis M. Andrews, The Federalist

Citizens and local leaders should use the looming pension crisis in many states and cities to release local governments from centralized control.

Is School Choice Feasible in Rural States?
Lindsey Burke, The Daily Signal

Although states across the country have embraced school choice, rural states have done so more slowly, in part, say some, out of a belief that choice won’t work effectively in those communities.

We refused to tell people in this Bihar village that they need help. It worked wonders
Zubin Sharma, Quartz

In the longer-term, the method we choose affects the community’s self-identity and understanding of their own capacities.

Blog author: jcarter
Monday, October 6, 2014
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Education Needs More Freedom, Not More Money
Emily Domenech, The Federalist

Oh, what I could do with the money my local school system spends while complaining they just don’t get enough to offer many extras.

Child Poverty Rate Five Times Lower in Married-Parent Homes
Rachel Sheffield, The Daily Signal

Child poverty rates have decreased slightly, according to the latest Census data. Child poverty dropped from 21.8 percent to 19.9 percent between 2012 and 2013.

Sandy Hook Commission Calls For Government Crackdown On Homeschools
Eric Owens, The Daily Caller

Under a new law proposed this week by Connecticut Gov. Dannel Malloy’s Sandy Hook Advisory Commission, every homeschooling parent with a child who has been labeled with a behavioral or emotional problem would be forced to submit to a host of strict, burdensome regulations.

Megabanks have prison financial services market locked up
Daniel Wagner, Center for Public Integrity

Government gives no-bid contracts to Bank of America, JP Morgan.

Blog author: jcarter
Friday, October 3, 2014
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Israeli-Arab Priest to UN: “Israel Only Place Where Christians in Middle East Are Safe”
Anav Silverman , Breaking Israel News

In a speech to the United Nations Human Rights Council today on September 23, Father Gabriel Naddaf, an Israeli Arab Greek Orthodox priest from Nazareth, called attention to the plight of Christian minorities suffering under Muslim extremists in the Arab world.

Another court strikes down Obamacare subsidies in 36 states
Adrianna McIntyre , Vox

The Eastern District Court of Oklahoma ruled to strike down Obamacare’s subsides on federal exchanges, consistent with a ruling in a related lawsuit earlier in the summer.

Can a Nation’s Soil Explain Its Economic Fortunes?
Joe Pinsker, The Atlantic

If your ancestors could grow crops easily—and thus get proof that patience pays off—you’re more likely to value distant payoffs, argue two economists in a new paper.

Who brought the Arabs to this nadir?
Hisham Melhem, Al Arabiya News

Today, the world of millions of Arabs is collapsing; whole societies are consumed by the flames of sectarianism, political fragmentation and economic disenfranchisement.

Blog author: jcarter
Thursday, October 2, 2014
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Fusionism, Hobby Lobby, and the Constitution
Brandon James Smith, Public Discourse

Responses to the Hobby Lobby case demonstrate the importance of conservatives and libertarians working toward common goals.

John Carroll: America’s Bishop
George J. Galloway, Catholic Exchange

When President James Madison asked for and received, by a narrow margin, a declaration of war against Great Britain in 1812, there was one man in the new republic who knew exactly what to do: John “Jackie” Carroll, Archbishop of Baltimore, an aging shepherd of a small and widely diverse flock, in a fledgling democracy about to enter into war against the greatest sea power on earth, got on his knees and dedicated America to the Immaculate Heart of Mary.

Recessions drive down fertility rates for more than a decade
Sarah Kliff, Vox

When the economy goes south, Americans tend to have fewer babies. Researchers have know this for awhile and, intuitively, it makes sense: tough economic times can put the costs of raising a child out of reach. The pattern has repeated itself again and again, with birth rates dropping as unemployment rises.

Christine Caine, Liberty University to Launch ‘Lean In’-Type Program for Christian Women
Kate Shellnutt, Christianity Today

Propel calls on the church to equip and validate working women.