Category: PowerLinks

Blog author: jcarter
posted by on Monday, June 16, 2014

Understanding God’s Love: A Primer on Mercy and Justice
Eduardo Echeverria, Crisis Magazine

The question here is how we avoid both despair when confronted with the gravity of our sins, on the one hand, and a sentimental view of God and of his love, on the other.

Catholics & Capitalism
Roger Kimball, PJ Media

Here’s the bottom line: Capitalism is the greatest engine for the production of wealth the ingenuity of man has ever invented. Are you interested in helping the poor? Embrace capitalism.

Crony Capitalism Kicks Off the World Cup
Catherine Addington, The American Conservative

Crony capitalism looks a little different when the corruption in question is pervading a stateless conglomerate. But government cooperation, internal politics, and the casual passing of millions of dollars are looking all-too-familiar as one of the world’s largest bureaucracies takes center stage with the 2014 World Cup kicking off in São Paulo, Brazil today.

European Court Faults Russia For Dissolving Pentecostal Church
Howard Friedman, Religion Clause

In Biblical Centre of the Chuvash Republic v. Russia, (ECHR 1st Section, June 12, 2014), the European Court of Human Rights in a Chamber Judgment held that Russia violated Art. 9 of the European Convention on Human Rights (freedom of thought, conscience and religion) interpreted in light of Art. 11

Blog author: jcarter
posted by on Friday, June 13, 2014

The Future of Christianity in America
Joe Carter, Aleteia

The case for what might seem like an unusual spiritual indicator.

Anti-Catholicism: The Defining Religious Principle of Early America?
Thomas Kidd, The Anxious Bench

There’s nothing like war to fuel prejudice of all kinds, and the imperial conflicts of the first six decades of the eighteenth century fostered a particularly intense anti-Catholicism among many Americans.

A Way Out of the For-Profit Conundrum
Mark L. Movsesian, Cornerstone

Hobby Lobby could easily turn out to be the most important religious liberty decision in a quarter-century. The questions presented are technical ones about the construction of the Religious Freedom Restoration Act (RFRA), which has been, until now, an entirely uncontroversial federal statute.

Four Defining Characteristics of Biblical Flourishing
Hugh Whelchel, Institute for Faith, Work, and Economics

How do you live the good life? How do you really, truly flourish? What’s more, how do we as Christians navigate the clash of cultural visions concerning “the good life” and what it means to flourish?

Blog author: jcarter
posted by on Thursday, June 12, 2014

Union Becomes the World’s First Seminary to Divest from Fossil Fuels
Serene Jones, Time

New York’s Union Theological Seminary–home to famed theologians Paul Tillich, Reinhold Niebuhr, and Dietrich Bonhoeffer, as well as a $108.4 million endowment–will be the first seminary in the world to divest from fossil fuels.

Sex, Drugs and GDP: the Challenge of Measuring the Shadow Economy
Josh Zumbrun, Wall Street Journal

New methods of measuring economies sometimes raise eyebrows. Even more so when they involve prostitutes and mounds of cocaine.

Meriam Ibrahim and the Obama Administration
John Burger, Aleteia

Nina Shea wonders why president remains silent, even after trumpeting religious freedom policy.

Colleges and Evangelicals Collide on Bias Policy
Michael Paulson, New York Times

In a collision between religious freedom and antidiscrimination policies, the student group, and its advisers, have refused to agree to the college’s demand that any student, regardless of his or her religious beliefs, should be able to run for election as a leader of any group, including the Christian association.

Blog author: jcarter
posted by on Wednesday, June 11, 2014

A Defeat for Terrible Teachers in California
Katrina Trinko, The Daily Signal

In a Los Angeles Superior Court ruling today, Judge Rolf M. Treu “found five California laws governing teacher tenure, layoffs and dismissals unconstitutional,” reports Politico.

Faith, Economics, and the Working Poor
Blaine Crawford, Kern Pastors Network

If the integration of faith and work – or this whole movement ‒ is to go anywhere, it must be holistic and inclusive enough to avoid marginalizing those who work in the service industry, blue-collar trades, and those without multiple degrees.

Why expanding the child tax credit is pro-growth, supply-side tax reform
James Pethokoukis, AEI Ideas

If people want smaller families, that’s their choice, right? Right, indeed. And natalist policies have a poor record at nudging people into having more kids than they want. Except that American families are having fewer children than they would like.

Don’t Abet Academia’s Crackdown on Religious Liberty
Seth Mandel , Commentary

By far the most strategically canny aspect of liberal institutions’ multifront attack on religious freedom in America has been the (alas, successful) bid to divide and conquer.

Blog author: jcarter
posted by on Tuesday, June 10, 2014

Minimum Wage Hikes Make Labor a Luxury Good
Andrew Woodman, The Federalist

Don’t force companies to choose between hiring more employees at inflated wages and developing new products or instituting new safety measures.

9 Things You Should Know About Surrogacy
Joe Carter, The Gospel Coalition

Last week, the issue of surrogacy returned to the news when Louisiana Governor Bobby Jindal vetoed legislation allowing for legal surrogacy births. Here are nine things you should know about surrogacy.

Contraception, Rights, and Total State Control
James V. Schall, S.J., Catholic World Report

Charles E. Rice’s new book argues that once absolute relativism is established as the state “religion” there is no limit to what the state can and will do.

What’s the Point of the Church Fighting Poverty?
Elise Amyx, Institute for Faith, Work, and Economics

If God became man and came to earth to meet us in our physical nature, if he healed the sick and the blind, then it must mean his redemptive work is for all of creation, not just our individual souls.

Blog author: jcarter
posted by on Monday, June 9, 2014

West moves away from Russia as the country returns to Orthodoxy, Lavrov believes
Interfax

Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov states that Russia returns to traditional spiritual values and it is one of the reasons why the West distances from it.

Pope Francis sacks entire board of Vatican’s financial watchdog
Philip Pullella, The Independent

Pope Francis sacked the five-man board of the Vatican’s financial watchdog on Thursday – all Italians – in the latest move to break with an old guard associated with a murky past under his predecessor.

In Defense of the Phrase “Faith and Work”
Greg Forster, Hang Together

Recently I’ve heard several major leaders in the faith and work movement criticizing the fact that we call it the “faith and work” movement. I rise in defense of the phrase.

A happy epilogue for the Cold War
Phil Lawler, CatholicCulture.org

One of the most enduring visual images of the Cold War—one of the early signs that the Soviet empire was doomed—was the sight of General Wojciech Jaruzelski, the Polish strongman, literally shaking as he addressed the enormous crowd that gathered to greet St. John Paul II on his triumphant return to his homeland.

Blog author: jcarter
posted by on Friday, June 6, 2014

Will Catholics Comply?
Michael Gorman, First Things

The Bishops said they couldn’t go along with the HHS mandate. Will they in the end?

More evidence that giving poor people money is a great cure for poverty
Dylan Matthews, Vox

As solutions to global poverty go, “just give poor people money” is pretty rock solid. A recent randomized trial found that Kenyans who received no-strings attached cash from the charity GiveDirectly built more assets, bought more goods, were less hungry, and were all-around happier than those who didn’t get cash.

How to Form a Real Conscience
Anthony Esolen, Crisis Magazine

It is also impossible to admit your need for a master if you won’t accept a truth unless it can be expressed so as to satisfy your intellect, here, now. What seems to be a paradox is easy to resolve once we consider the difference between nobility and what Max Scheler called ressentiment, in his remarkable book of that name.

Is Capital a Blessing or a Curse?
Shawn Ritenour, Institute for Faith, Work, and Economics

“Capital is opposed to labor, and the rich get richer while the poor get poorer” is a phrase heard all too often. It’s often repeated by those who misunderstand the true economic relationship between capital formation and the productivity and real income of workers.

Blog author: jcarter
posted by on Thursday, June 5, 2014

Scholar Who Taught John Paul II To Appreciate Capitalism Worries About Pope Francis
Jerry Bowyer, Forbes

Michael Novak’s memoirs, Writing From Left to Right, helped me understand how Michael and others helped guide John Paul II to come to an appreciation of capital which he had not learned earlier.

The Science of Designing Food for the World’s Poor
Uri Friedman, The Atlantic

Enlisting cartoon characters and computer software in the fight against malnutrition.

A simple guide to how VA health care works
German Lopez, Vox

Behind the Veterans Affair scandal is a fairly complicated health-care system for veterans.

5 Things You Should Know About the Tiananmen Square Massacre
Noah Rayman, Time

Twenty-five years ago Wednesday, Chinese troops violently retook the square in Beijing where pro-democracy protesters had set up camp for weeks. The Tiananmen Square massacre left an unknown number dead, with some estimates in the thousands, and smothered a democratic movement.

Blog author: jcarter
posted by on Wednesday, June 4, 2014

No, TARP Didn’t Prevent a Second Depression
Stephen Moore, The Foundry

Conservatives must not let the left write the narrative of the financial crisis and the massive and unprecedented government interventions designed to combat it — as they are trying to do.

Distributism’s Real Problem
Greg Forster, First Things

If your answer does involve contracting the free exchange of goods and services, you have ceased to be a distributist.

Baptist Missionary Sentenced to Life in Hard Labor by North Korea
Choe Sang-Hun, New York Times

The missionary, Kim Jong-uk, was also convicted of spying and other various “anti-state” crimes during a trial in Pyongyang on Friday, the North’s official Korean Central News Agency said on Saturday. A large crowd attended Mr. Kim’s trial, the report said.

Will the Poor Really Always Be with Us?
Elise Amyx, Institute for Faith, Work, and Economics

This is one of the most quoted passages in scripture on poverty, but it is also one of the most misused.

Blog author: jcarter
posted by on Tuesday, June 3, 2014

Christian Leaders May Return to Nicaea: What Does It Mean?
Emma Green, The Atlantic

In 2025, Roman Catholics and Eastern Orthodox Christians could go back to the place where early followers of Jesus tried to create a consensus among all of Christendom.

Groups push military for more religious liberty
Meredith Somers, Washington Times

“This is our military telling service members to raise their hands and ask permission before they dare to utter an expression of faith,” Mr. Fleming said during a speech at the Family Research Council.

Neo-Jim Crow in the Middle East
Gary Bauer, Washington Times

Sadly, a version of Jim Crow has been resurrected — but this time, his targets are the ancient Christian populations of the Middle East. Read more: http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2014/may/29/bauer-an-old-evil-in-the-middle-east/#ixzz33D9Ga5pu Follow us: @washtimes on Twitter

25 years after Tiananmen Square, China tightens grip on religious freedom
William McKenzie, CNN

Twenty-five years after Tiananmen Square – where on June 4, 1989, Chinese soldiers turned their guns on protesting students and activists – freedom remains elusive.