Category: PowerLinks

Blog author: jcarter
Wednesday, October 7, 2015

The Crisis In International Religious Freedom
David D. Corey, First Things

The vital question is why the number of countries committing and supporting religious persecution is growing so rapidly. The number of CPSs has nearly doubled in a year. What lies behind this startling trend?

Supreme Court Justices Get More Liberal As They Get Older
Oliver Roeder, FiveThirtyEight

A typical justice nominated by a Republican president starts out at age 50 as an Antonin Scalia and retires at age 80 as an Anthony Kennedy. A justice nominated by a Democrat, however, is a lifelong Stephen Breyer.

African governments show improvements but progress ‘stalls’

Thirty-three out of Africa’s 54 countries have shown improvements in the way they are governed over the last four years, research has found.

Uber, Millennials And The Struggle For The Free Market
Tom Rogan, Opportunity Lives

Unfortunately, from Frankfurt to Paris, Madrid to Rome, Sao Paulo to San Francisco, London to New York and beyond, ride-sharing firms are under attack from increasingly aggressive enemies.

Blog author: jcarter
Tuesday, October 6, 2015

Funding growth, expanding opportunity: Novel funding mechanisms for schools of choice
Michael Q. McShane, AEI Ideas

Private school choice programs and the organizations that support them could do a much better job deferring the capital, infrastructure, and other fixed costs of participating private schools.

This is the simplest solution to help Africans live longer
Samuel Oti, Quartz

For many African countries and especially among poorer communities, when people die there is no trace in any official legal record or statistic.

How Do You Improve Worker Pay? Licensing Reforms, Not Unions.
James Sherk and Astrid Gonzalez, The Daily Signal

What do today’s workers need? The White House appears to believe the answer is “a union.” At a summit Wednesday the administration plans to showcase workers unions have helped. That is fair enough, but most workers don’t find unions relevant to their working lives. A much greater problem is the barriers the government itself erects.

The Military Isn’t A Low-Wage Option For Stupid People
Emily Domenech, The Federalist

Active-duty military troops far out-earn their civilian counterparts when compared to civilians with similar education.

Blog author: jcarter
Monday, October 5, 2015

What this new experiment in Chicago can teach us about combating poverty
Joel Dodge, The Week

In an age of rising inequality and stagnating incomes, we must look for ways to get smarter about fighting economic insecurity. This means adapting successful anti-poverty interventions to meet the needs of low-income Americans.

Why raising taxes on the rich doesn’t reduce inequality
James Pethokoukis, AEI Ideas

The progressive/left-wing response to the new Brookings study on inequality is obvious, right? From “Would a significant increase in the top income tax rate substantially alter income inequality?”

God’s Purpose in Creation: A Study in Genesis 1
Greg Ayers, Institute for Faith, Work, and Economics

The first chapter of Genesis is more than the introduction to the first book of the Bible. It’s the opening chapter in the grand story of God’s redemptive plan for his creation.

Criminal justice reformers just secured a major victory: a bill that could pass the Senate
Dara Lind, Vox

On Thursday, a group of senators introduced a bill they called “the biggest criminal justice reform in a generation” — an effort that, unlike other bills, actually has a shot at moving through the chamber.

Blog author: jcarter
Friday, October 2, 2015

It’s sleazy, it’s totally illegal, and yet it could become the future of retirement
Jeff Guo, Washington Post

Over 100 years ago in America — before Social Security, before IRAs, corporate pensions and 401(k)s — there was a ludicrously popular (and somewhat sleazy) retirement scheme called the tontine.

World Bank rethinks poverty measure
Noel King, Marketplace

The United Nations General Assembly meets in New York City this week, and poverty is high on the agenda. Eradicating extreme poverty by the year 2030 is No. 1 on the U.N. list of sustainable development goals. The World Bank, which sets the benchmark for the global extreme poverty line, is expected to shift the line soon from $1.25 a day to $1.90 a day.

Evangelicals Going to the Dogs — and Cats — With Major Statement on Animal Welfare
David Briggs, Huffington Post

First, Pope Francis issued a major encyclical in June stating any act of cruelty toward any creature “is contrary to human dignity.” Now, evangelicals are turning their attention to all creatures great and small.

How important is inequality to voters?
Karlyn Bowman and Heather Sims, AEI Ideas

What are Americans saying about the issue that Mayor de Blasio and the candidates should know? Do people think the deck is stacked against them? Do they believe inequality is getting worse? How important will the issue be in 2016?

Blog author: jcarter
Thursday, October 1, 2015

The public value of religious faith
Mark DeForrest, The New Reform Club

In the midst of the “new atheist” attack on the value of religion as a public good, British philosopher Roger Scruton took part in a discussion regarding that topic over at the UK Independent online: Scruton defended religion as a force for good in society.

Cards Against Humanitarians
Ilya Lozovsky, Foreign Policy

How a satirical card game is skewering the international development industry — and raising uncomfortable critiques of the global development agenda.

Victims of China’s Religious Liberty ‘Crackdown’ Appeal to Obama. But Will He Help?
Madaline Donnelly, The Daily Signal

Earlier this week, as devout American Catholics took to the streets of Washington to celebrate the arrival of Pope Francis, four Chinese human rights activists sat in a small, plain congressional office room on Capitol Hill.

A Place for the Stateless: Can a Startup City Solve the Refugee Crisis?
Mark Lutter, Foundation for Economic Education

Can refugees (and billionaire investors) build their own state?

Blog author: jcarter
Wednesday, September 30, 2015

The Free Market: It’s Like Uber, But for Everything
Robert Tracinski, The Federalist

If it sometimes seems like it’s impossible to restore the free market, as if every new wave of government regulation is irreversible, then consider that one form of regulation, which is common in the most dogmatically big-government enclaves in the country, is being pretty much completely dismantled before our eyes. And it’s the hippest thing ever.

A Millennial’s Take on Godly Civil Disobedience
Bryan Ballas, Juicy Ecumenism

So was Kim Davis in the right? To answer this question we must approach the issue from two angles: the authority of government and the duty of the Christian in the face of unjust orders.

Right To Work 2.0: A Vision For New Business And Economic Growth
Jay Caruso, Opportunity Lives

Big business loves regulation because it prevents competition. Amazon, Home Depot, Best Buy, and other big online retailers support an Internet sales tax because smaller online retailers will have difficulty complying.

Seven-in-ten people globally live on $10 or less per day
Rakesh Kochhar, Pew Research

Following his election in March 2013, Pope Francis wasted little time in conveying his great unease with the state of global poverty and inequality.

Blog author: jcarter
Tuesday, September 29, 2015

Taxing Churches Would Marry Church And State
Paul R. DeHart and Kevin Stuart, The Federalist

Saying government can tax religious organizations affirms the sovereignty of state over church.

Bulgaria should not let more migrants in, Orthodox Church says
Sofia News Agency

The Bulgarian Orthodox Church has announced it will help migrants who have arrived in Bulgaria, but has urged authorities not to let any more migrants in.

What the four previous popes had to say about socialism
Mark J. Perry, AEI Ideas

Pope Pius XI further emphasized the fundamental opposition between Communism and Christianity, and made it clear that no Catholic could subscribe even to moderate Socialism.

How We Should Help the Poor Escape Poverty
Collette Caprara, The Daily Signal

The Census Bureau’s most recent poverty data was released last week and, predictably, vast expenditures on anti-poverty programs have not budged the numbers: more than 45 million Americans are living in poverty.