Category: Video

According to a common political narrative prior to the 2016 elections, progressivism has been ascendent and conservatism has been on an inevitable decline in America in significant part due to demographic changes. Among those changes is the growth of the Latino population, which is assumed to be a natural constituency for progressive politics. In the wake of the election, this may be one among many narratives that need to be re-thought.

Evangelicals are one of the fastest growing segments in Latino communities, and they demonstrates a high affinity to a pro-growth, free oriented agenda. Among Hispanics who affiliate with evangelical denominations, 40 percent identify as conservative against just 25 percent who identify as liberal. Daniel Garza, Executive Director of The LIBRE Initiative, joined us here at the Acton Institute on November 17th to argue that past failures to garner support for market ideas among Latino populations have not been due to a rejection of those ideas by Latinos; rather, the failures have been the result of a lack of effort to promote the virtues of free-market, pro-liberty ideas within that community.

You can view Garza’s full Acton Lecture Series presentation via the video player below.

On November 3rd, Acton welcomed Victoria C. G. Coates, cultural historian and Ph.D, to talk about her argument that democracy has had a unique capacity to inspire some of the greatest artistic achievements of western civilization. She lays out this thesis in her latest book, David’s Sling: A History of Democracy in Ten Works of Art. In her Acton Lecture Series address, Coates takes as her case studies Michelangelo’s “David” and Albert Bierstadt’s “Rocky Mountains: Lander’s Peak“, describing the roles each played in their respective civilizations as well as the underlying political meanings of each piece.

You can watch Victoria Coates’ lecture via the video player below.

On October 27, 2016, Acton Institute President Rev. Robert A. Sirico addressed the audience at the Acton Institute’s 26th Anniversary Dinner in Grand Rapids, Michigan. In his remarks, he reflected on the state of American politics and culture, the societal crisis we find ourselves in, and proposed a way forward based on a vision of a free and virtuous society.

You can view his entire address below.

Blog author: jcarter
Tuesday, November 1, 2016
By

Note: This is the eighth post in a weekly video series on basic microeconomics.

Prices can have an effect on the demand of goods and services. But how much does quantity demanded change when prices changes? By a lot or by a little? Elasticity can help us understand this question. This video covers determinants of elasticity such as availability of substitutes, time horizon, classification of goods, nature of goods (is it a necessity or a luxury?), and the size of the purchase relative to the consumer’s budget.

(If you find the pace of the videos too slow, I’d recommend watching them at 1.5 to 2 times the speed. You can adjust the speed at which the video plays by clicking on “Settings” (the gear symbol) and changing “Speed” from normal to 1.25, 1.5 or 2.)

Previous in series: Does the equilibrium model work in the real world?

On October 27, 2016, Rev. Paul Scalia addressed the audience at the Acton Institute’s 26th Anniversary Dinner in Grand Rapids, Michigan after accepting the 2016 Faith and Freedom Award on behalf of his late father, Supreme Court Associate Justice Antonin Scalia.

More: We’re happy to share these highlights from Justice Scalia’s 1997 keynote address at Acton’s 7th Anniversary Dinner; his wit and good humor are among his many great qualities that are deeply missed:

Many of America’s immigrants fled nations that were ruined by corrupt politicians and failed government policies. So why, asks Gloria Alvarez, “do you support the same policies in the U.S. that caused you to flee your home country?”

Alvarez, Project Director at the National Civic Movement of Guatemala, says that what makes the United States different from her home country of Guatemala is the “unique American belief in limited government” that leads to greater individual freedom and personal responsibility.

This video is also available in Spanish.

(Via: Opportunity Lives)

Note: This is the seventh post in a weekly video series on basic microeconomics.

In previous videos in this series from Marginal Revolution University we learned how prices reach equilibrium and how the market works like an invisible hand coordinating economic activity. In the next couple of videos you’ll see why the equilibrium price (he market price where the quantity of goods supplied is equal to the quantity of goods demanded) is the only stable price and whether this model works in the real world.


(more…)