Category: Vocation

sanders-roweI mostly blame high school guidance counselors for our current confusion about college.

Don’t get me wrong, most counselors are fine, well-intentioned people. When I was a recruiter for the Marines in the mid-1990s I met dozens of them and appreciated the work they did. But as a group they tend to have a more-or-less unstated mantra: All kids should go to college.

If a high school student expressed a very strong interest in the military or trade school (or was in danger of dropping out of school altogether), they might encourage them to follow those paths. But for the most part, every student—even the ones barely able to pass their high school curriculum—were encouraged to go to college.

Nowadays that mentality seems to be shared by a majority of parents and politicians. It’s taken to such an extreme that Bernie Sanders, a U.S. Senator and presidential candidate, wrote on Twitter:

Providing a path for kids to go to the University of Iowa is a hell of a lot cheaper than providing them a path to go to jail. #iacaucus

Later that same day, Sanders tweeted:
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children1With our newfound economic prosperity and the political liberalization of the West, we have transitioned into an era of hyper consumerism and choice. This involves all sorts of blessings, to be sure, but it brings its own distinct risks.

Whether it be materialism or a more basic idolatry of choice, such distortions will be sure to diminish or disintegrate any number of areas across society. But the deleterious effects on the family and children are particularly pronounced.

Throughout most of human history, children were most often the brightest light in an otherwise bleak existence of poverty, toil, and high mortality. For those with little freedom, few resources, and zero opportunity, children were a blessing and a bounty: a gift (and not just for the labor). Now, however, presented with a range of vocational options and the wealth and leisure to support them, our priorities have significantly shifted. We are prodded toward career or education or adventurism first, teased by a platter of technological tools to further prevent a child’s intrusion into our planned prospects. (more…)

Blog author: jsunde
Wednesday, December 9, 2015
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0611When we think about “stewardship,” our minds tend to revert to the material and the predictable. We think about money or the allocation of resources. We think about growing crops or creating goods or financial investment and generosity.

For the Christian, however, stewardship goes much further, weaving closely together the tangible and transcendent in all areas of life. “Stewardship is far more than the handling of our money,” write Lester DeKoster and Gerard Berghoef. “Stewardship is the handling of life, and time, and destiny.”

In For the Life of the World, God’s oikonomia is compared to a song, with our activity in each sphere of creation harmonizing together even as it plays in its own distinct way and through its own “modes of operation” — whether in family, business, education, or elsewhere. God has given us stewardship as a gift, granting the responsibility to manage his house and the availability to partner with the divine in that remarkable task.

C.S. Lewis points to this reality in The Magician’s Nephew, where he writes at length about the origins of Narnia and the creative call of humankind. (more…)

box2Contrary to popular perceptions, people with disabilities are equipped with unique skills and creative capacity, giving them a powerful role to play in the world economy, whether as restauranteurs, goldsmiths, warehouse workers, marine biologists, car washers, or Costco employees.

Unfortunately, those gifts are not always recognized by the marketplace. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, the unemployment rate for those with disabilities is more than double the average for those without.

Thankfully, that blind spot is slowly being revealed, whether by forward-thinking entrepreneurs and executives or in the case of Vanderbilt’s Kennedy Center, university researchers and church congregations.

Thanks to a significant grant from the Kessler Foundation, researchers at the Kennedy Center are working with local churches to find new ways to provide work for young people with disabilities: (more…)

Marco Rubio has inspired plenty of chin-stroking over his recent remarks about welders earning more than philosophers.

“We need more welders and less philosophers,” he concluded in a recent debate.

The fact-checkers proceeded to fact-check, with many quickly declaring falsehood (e.g. 1, 2). Yet the series of subsequent quibbles over who actually makes how much continue to side-step the bigger issue. Though the liberal arts are indeed important and ought not be viewed simply in terms of “vocational training,” mainstream American culture is certainly fond of pretending as much.

The individualistic  dream-stoking rhetoric, inflated expectations, and subsequent angst have become all too nightmarish a cliche among my generation, joined by ever-increasing attempts to secure more government goodies to keep the machine humming along. Surely there are many who approach the liberal arts with a healthy perspective, but at the same time, the jokes about the barista going for his third Master’s degree aren’t exactly jokes.

Rather than approaching each individual as a creative person with unique gifts and educational aspirations, we continue to pretend that one vocational or educational track ought to apply to all. At the same time, rather than approaching the so-called “job market” as an ecosystem of creativity and collaboration, filled with countless human needs waiting to be met, we revert to thinking only of ourselves, self-constructing our preferred vocational destinies while we move through the college assembly line. (more…)

In Cuba, taxi drivers earn far more than doctors, raking in more money in one day than a doctor will make in an entire month.

The reason? Unlike most of the Cuban economy, taxi licenses are privately held and wages are not set by the state.

Johnny Harris explains:

Although Cuba offers few opportunities for private enterprise — outside of its sprawling black market, that is — the number of self-employed workers has slowly grown in recent years. Seven years after Raul Castro took over, 20% of the economy is now private.  (more…)

What is the pastor’s role in affirming the various callings within his congregation? How might churches empower the people of God in pursuing vocational clarity and economic transformation? How can we better encourage, equip, and empower others in engaging their cultures and communities?

In a talk for the Oikonomia Network, theologian and author Charlie Self explores these questions and more, relaying many of the themes of Flourishing Churches and Communities, his Pentecostal primer on faith, work, and economics.

“Faithful churches create flourishing communities,” says Self, “bringing the joy, peace, and justice of Jesus Christ in everyday life.”

Pastors have a great role to play in commissioning their people to create value through all of their work, and commissioning entrepreneurship and creativity. And they have great value also in letting us know that we’re more than our job…And yet waking up on Monday with purpose is so important for discipleship, for personal thriving, and for community flourishing. Are you commissioning people to do God’s work in the world through their work? …

…The pastor has the job not to be a specialist in every field, but to give the gospel-centric and ethical boundaries and blessings by which they can go and flourish in each of their vocations. …Pastors can help people see that vocation is larger than just the job, that one’s calling to Christ in general, and specific gifts and mission, include their daily work and transcend it, and that daily work…is part of obedience in this age while we wait for the coming Lord.

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