Today’s Word from Solzhenitsyn

From the new Solzhenitsyn Reader, which I highly recommend (especially if you are behind on your Christmas shopping): Human society cannot be exempted from the laws and demands which constitute the aim and meaning of individual human lives. Continue Reading...

Hasta La Vista, Siesta

In this week’s Acton Commentary, Anthony Bradley takes a look at the Spanish economy as it faces a “dilemma,” as he puts it, “simultaneously needing immigrants and seeking to curb them.” Bradley also notes that “institutions like marriage and family seem silly to many Spaniards.” As APM’s Marketplace reports, shifting trends in Spain might claim another Spanish institution, the siesta. Continue Reading...

‘Reforming Natural Law’

The January 2007 issue of First Things features a lengthy review of Stephen Grabill’s new book on Protestant natural law thinking (no link to the review, unfortunately). J. Daryl Charles, an assistant professor at Union University, has this to say about Grabill’s Rediscovering the Natural Law in Reformed Theological Ethics (Eerdmans, 2006): Grabill’s examination of theological ethics in the Protestant Reformed mainstream is utterly compelling, and it represents a shot across the bow of theological ethics, as it were. Continue Reading...

Creepy Libertarianism, Creepy Statism

Rick Ritchie responds to this New Atlantis article by Peter Lawler, “Is the Body Property?” in a recent post on Daylight. Lawler discusses the increasingly broad push to commodify the human body, especially in the context of organ sales. Continue Reading...

Christian Ecology vs Dominionism

In December of last year I had a great back and forth on the topic of Christian dominionism with fellow green blogger Elsa at Greener Side. A friend wrote recently asking about those posts and my take on dominionism specifically. Continue Reading...

Christianity is Big Business in America

“Christian consumption has gone far beyond the book as millions use their buying power to reinforce their faith and show commitment to the Christian community,” reads an article in the current edition of USAToday (HT: ZondervanTo the Point) According to the piece, “Nearly 12% of Americans spend more than $50 a month on religious products, and another 11% spend $25 to $29, according to a national survey of 1,721 adults by Baylor University, out in September.” There has been a great deal of media attention paid to the Bible market in particular in the past few weeks. Continue Reading...

Politicians and Pigskin

Geoffrey Norman at NRO offers a delightfully sarcastic discussion of the move by a couple of Michigan state senators to use the BCS title game controversy as an opportunity for political grandstanding. Continue Reading...

‘Give Us Your Hearts’

In a recent open letter to immigrants to the United States, Jennifer Roback Morse expands on the words of Emma Lazarus engraved at the base of the Statue of Liberty. Lazarus wrote: “Give us your tired, your poor, your huddled masses, yearning to breathe free.” Morse goes one step further, asking immigrants to give their hearts as well. Continue Reading...